Anders Osborne Shares His Love For Crawfish & Jazz Fest In New Interview

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first_imgJazz Fest is always an exciting time for New Orleans. The influx of music-loving tourists combines with the city’s passion for music, and the result is an electrifying display of performances. With literally thousands of concerts to choose from, not only do fans have to make some difficult decisions, but artists do as well. We couldn’t be happier to have Anders Osborne performing at the inaugural NOLA Crawfish Festival, taking place during the “daze between” weekends of the main event from April 25-27.In this new interview, Osborne talks about his love for crawfish and his longstanding friendship with Crawfish King himself, Shaggy. Between that upcoming Crawfish Fest performance, his role as a judge for the fest’s Crawfish boil, a performance at the Fairground and two nights of Dead Feat, we just can’t wait! Read on for B. Getz’s exclusive with Anders Osborne below:L4LM: So to start off, just tell us a little about how you connected with Shaggy. Your friendship, and your involvement in the different crawfish boils he’s put on through the years.Anders Osborne: You know, there’s a real story, or I could make up something pretty! But the real story is, we used to hang out at a place called Checkpoint Charlie’s, me and a few other bands, a couple of guys – Jack Quigley and Irene and the Mikes and Kenny Holiday – we started music at Checkpoint Charlie’s in the very outskirts of the French Quarter in the late 80s. And Shaggy showed up a couple of years into that. Without getting into too many details, we were…exploring our youth and our flexibility. We just became good buddies, and when he got into some legal trouble I helped him out with that. And then we just kind of connected. He asked me to sign something so that he could get out on the weekends, and he was my roadie. It’s basically been a lifelong…adult lifelong relationship between me and Shaggy. Then we cleaned up, and became even closer friends. His business started booming, I’m extremely proud of what he’s doing. He’s taking care of business and raising a family, he’s just incredible. We talk every week.L4LM: It’s a beautiful thing to be able to ride that path together and maintain the friendship even stronger after all these years. I’ve spent a few nights in Checkpoint Charlie’s, I know the room, but I didn’t know the history.AO: It started out as a Mexican restaurant, and then it was empty for a long time. Then Igor opened this place up and I lived a block away and needed something to do in between out of town gigs, so I got a Tuesday night, and this guy Jack Quigley played on Monday nights. That’s how it started. We’d play for 20 percent of the bar, which at the time was two people each night – there was nobody there. So we didn’t make a whole lot of money. But eventually it grew into a major scene, in the early 90s. It was hoppin’.NOLA’s Crawfish King Is Cooking Up A Whole New FestivalL4LM: So that’s how you and Shaggy became friends, and now I understand you play at the events, his different boils through the years. You’re a headliner at this year’s NOLA Crawfish Fest, and you’re also a judge. Why don’t you tell me what you’ve got in store for that.AO: Crawfish is something that everybody who lives in or is from New Orleans or Louisiana in general, you encounter it every season. It starts around February and March and runs up till about June. The thing about crawfish is there’s a lot of different nuances to boiling it, and if you boil it in a certain way it might get darker, spicier, saltier, some people use more vegetables and sausages and stuff like that. There’s little things you can do that become your own recipe. What Shaggy’s done is there’s a lot of citrus, it’s very bright and has a happy feeling. It’s like a grape, you could eat it for a long time, snacky thing. His crawfish makes me happy.L4LM: Do you feel like you’re going to be a good judge of the different entries this year?AO: Nowadays I’m pretty clearheaded so I think I could tell the difference, but I think that’s a personal flavor. I think I’ll have a lot of fun eating all kinds of good crawfish! That’s for sure.Musically I’m gonna be part of the Crawfish Fest All-Stars on Wednesday the 27th with Billy Iuso, Dave Malone, George Porter, Jr, and Terence Higgins. I’m just gonna try and keep up with those guys.L4LM: You’ve played with those guys for decades now. I know you and Billy go way back, he’s been in your band in different incarnations. You think that you guys will just coalesce and do some traditional New Orleans tunes, the songbook?AO: I think so, I think so. I mean, Dave Malone and George Porter – between the two of them they know every song. L4LM: George wrote half of them.AO: Yeah, that’s right. And me and Billy and Terence, we’ll just be the young ones hanging on.L4LM: As usual you’re gigging throughout Jazz Fest. Anything you’re really looking forward to?AO: On Saturday I play the Fairgrounds, and then Saturday night and Sunday night I do Dead Feat at the Howlin Wolf, which is me and some members of Grateful Dead, Little Feat, Jackie Greene’s there, my bass player and drummer are there. We do a combination of a couple of tunes we love, and then a couple of Grateful Dead and Little Feat tunes, and a couple of my tunes. That’s gonna be great.last_img read more

See Anderson .Paak Electrify The Masses At Suwannee Hulaween [Videos]

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first_imgAnderson .Paak‘s rise to the national spotlight has been incredibly fast, but the road he walked to prepare himself for this moment was long and dark indeed. From heartbreaking family struggles to sold out performances at festivals like Suwannee Hulaween, appearances on tracks with Jay-Z and chart hits Paak has survived it all. Amazingly, Paak and his band The Free Nationals have used the strength built from that adversity to share a message of hope, inclusiveness and joy, packaged with a sexy swagger and a funky beat.Paak has spent time behind the drum kit, as he often does at live shows including the high energy set during the recent Halloween themed event at The Spirit Of the Suwannee Music Park. After setting the tone by coming out to a piped in tape of Guns n’ Roses “Welcome To The Jungle” the band launched straight into his most recent hit, “Come Down.” The crowd went into a frenzy, waving arms and getting down as one to the rock steady beats and sparking flow of Paak. Leaving the crowd no chance to catch their breath he then reeled off wild renditions of “Milk n’ Honey” and “Drugs,” each driving the audience further and further into the red zone of party madness.Easily one of the best received performances of the entire weekend, by the end of their allotted time they left to a chorus of pleas for more from a thoroughly excited crowd. Our own videographer Rex Thomson was on hand, capturing the experience as the park’s beloved Amphitheater went into a literal frenzy surrounding him.Check out the footage of the mayhem, below.“Come Down”“Milk n’ Honey”“Drugs”last_img read more

Marcus King Band Shreds “Hot ‘Lanta” At Sold Out Terminal West Performance [Audio/Gallery]

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first_imgLast weekend, rising guitar phenom Marcus King brought his soulful band to Atlanta’s Terminal West last Saturday, January 7th, for an all out celebration! King and his band worked a mixture of their rocking originals with classic covers, treating the Atlanta audience to a top notch show from cover to cover. The band even worked in a rendition of “Hot ‘Lanta” by the Allman Brothers Band for the Atlanta crowd, as well as tunes by Allen Toussaint and Blind Faith during the sold out show.Check out a full audio recording from the night, as provided by Jam Buzz.You can see the setlist, as well as a full gallery of images from EMily Butler Photography, below. Load remaining imageslast_img

The Meters’ Zigaboo Modeliste Joins Vulfpeck In San Francisco [Videos]

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first_img1612 Use Me Without a doubt, the funk outfit Vulfpeck has been on fire in recent days as they continue their tour following their second Red Rocks performance supporting Trey Anastasio Band last Wednesday. The group has been seeing sit-ins galore at a great number of their stops, inviting legendary musicians such as Lettuce’s Adam Deitch and Phish’s Trey Anastasio to join them during their two-night Colorado run. Once the Brooklyn-based funk ensemble hit California, the fresh faces kept coming, with Louis Cole joining the group in Los Angeles. During their Tuesday night show in San Francisco at The Fillmore, Vulfpeck and friends — specifically, frequent collaborators Antwaun Stanley, Cory Wong, and Joey Dosik, who have joined the core group on this tour — had another surprise guest in store for fans: The Meters’ legendary drummer Zigaboo Modeliste.Watch Trey Anastasio Jam “Rango” And Michael Jackson Cover With VulfpeckModeliste joined Vulfpeck for a number of songs in the middle of the group’s performance. After being introduced, The Meters’ drummer who has called the Bay Area home now for many years came out for The Meters’ own hit, “Cissy Strut.” From there, Antwaun Stanley led vocals on Vulfpeck’s “1612” and Bill Withers’ “Use Me” while Modeliste remained behind the kit and was regularly featured on both songs. You can check out fan-shot videos of Vulfpeck’s collaboration with Zigaboo Modeliste below, courtesy of Ted Silverman. You can also check out a video that the band posted to their official Facebook page, which shows what the collaboration looked like from the stage. Check these videos out below.Vulfpeck Welcomes Adam Deitch, Treats Denver To “Dubstep” Double Encore [Videos]Setlist: Vulfpeck | The Fillmore | San Francisco, CA | 6/6/2017Set: Intro, Fugue State, Cory Wong, Chepe, My First Car, Cissy Strut*, 1612*, Use Me Up (Bill Withers)*, Funky Duck, Aunt Leslie, Wait For The Moment, Bitter Sport, Back Pocket, Beastly, Christmas In L.A., Deantown* with Zigaboo Modeliste on drumsCissy Strutlast_img read more

The First Of Owsley Stanley’s Sonic Journals To Be Released In June

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first_imgThe infamous sound engineer for the Grateful Dead, Owsley Stanley, in addition to creating the Grateful Dead’s speaker system, The Wall of Sound, and his legendary lysergic creations, was also well-known for his many “Sonic Journals” — a collection of around 1,300 tapes capturing over eighty different artists recorded by Stanley in San Francisco during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Owsley’s son, Starfinder Stanley, has been tasked with the job of cataloging and transferring his father’s reel-to-reel concert recordings to a digital format. The first fruits of the younger Stanley’s labor will arrive with the release of the seven-disc box set, Doc & Merle Watson: Never The Same Way Once, which is due out on June 23rd.Oteil Burbridge Talks About Taking Owsley LSD At The Gorge With Dead & CompanyOwsley Stanley was known as a brilliant sound engineer, whose focus on microphone placement over the use of a soundboard to equalize the sound characterized his work. For his Sonic Journals, Stanley would capture a set as a whole rather than cutting out and remastering the individual tracks, as noted by his son Starfinder in a recent article in SF Gate, saying, “He really viewed them as capturing a musical event and not as a recording that could be cut up and overdubbed and reconfigured. . . . What he wanted was to present the show as it was experienced. Its warts and all. He wouldn’t fix mistakes.”After Owsley died in 2011, the responsibility of dealing with the immense Sonic Journal archive fell to Starfinder. With these reels having lived in storage for over fifty years, time has increasingly become an issue if these musical records are to be preserved. In the same SF Gate article, Starfinder elaborated, “[Owsley] had told me that if he didn’t manage to deal with the tapes before he died, he expected I would deal with them to his exacting standards. . . . We have to transfer the music off the tapes before the tapes deteriorate and the music is literally lost. . . . They’ve got a finite life span, and it’s just about up.”A New Biography Of Owsley Stanley Ft. Grateful Dead Members Will Soon Be ReleasedNever The Same Way Once is the first Sonic Journal release and foreshadows the release of increasingly more concert recordings from Owsley’s archive. In addition to the Grateful Dead (including the group’s double bill with Miles Davis), other recordings include Johnny Cash, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and more.last_img read more

EXCLUSIVE: Sister Sparrow Bassist, Josh Myers, Talks New Side Project And Gives Dirty Birds Update

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first_imgBassist, Josh Myers, best known for being in Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, is currently working on his revived side project, Big Words. With two upcoming dates in July and potential for more in the fall, Live For Live Music chatted with Myers to find out more about what’s going on with Sister Sparrow and to learn more about what he’s been up to recently.L4LM: Take us through your younger years. What were some of your influences? Who inspired you and how did you find your way into the music industry?Josh Myers: I started playing music when I was about 6. I grew up outside of Boston and got into classical piano for a number of years. I never really got good at that. Right around the beginning of high school, I switched piano teachers. My new teacher was a jazz pianist. Instead of just teaching the mechanics of the piano, he was teaching the mechanics of music. That’s where I started to get really into music.Around 16 or so, I really got into the guitar and it came very naturally to me. Then, I switched to bass about a year later, just as a hobby. This is the same story that every bass player has. There were way too many guitarists in my group of friends. I picked it up for the first time at a friend’s house, who happened to have one, and we played Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love” for like six hours with one groove. When I got really into the electric bass, I went through all of my favorite music just playing along to it. It gave me a chance to learn different styles by different people.By the time I got to college age, I was thinking I was going to be a jazz musician. I still play a little bit of jazz, but it’s been taken over more by the stuff I loved in high school, which was The Meters, Soundgarden, Tool. It swings back and forth, whether it’s the ’70’s funk, soul, and groove stuff that really moves me or that really heavy grunge that I just loved and would listen to in high school in my room on loop.L4LM: What is currently happening with Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds? Can you bring fans up to speed on what they can expect next? JM: The guitarist, Sasha Brown, left and began doing his own thing. Unrelated to that, Arleigh Kincheloe became pregnant. There was a long period of time when people were asking us what was going on with the band. We weren’t touring. The main thing that we did was tour. We would occasionally take a break to record. We were never the kind of band that put anything in front of touring, so it was a huge change for us. Post baby, we still have plans to be a band. We are all still in the fold. That’s what we’re all thinking.After Sasha’s departure show in New York, we had about ten shows after that. It was mainly Northeast stuff, and we played some New Year’s shows. We played Bearsville Theater in Woodstock, which was amazing. We opened for Galactic at Playstation Theater in Times Square. Then we went on Blues Cruise in January and had four sets on that boat. After the fourth one, we were all looking around like, “Okay, that was it. We’re on break now.” It was a really strange feeling.Break has been really good, actually. I’ve reconnected with the writing side of myself, and the freelancer side. I’ve had a ton of different gigs, going to different places, doing stuff I haven’t done in the last four years because I’ve been full time on the road. It’s been great.L4LM: This brings us up to your revived project, Big Words. Tell us more about that.JM: After the band realized that we were going to have some time off, I started doing a lot of soul-searching. I did some iTunes library searching and found this music that I had written and recorded back in 2009. The band, Big Words, was completely different. We actually had the drummer from the original line-up of Sister Sparrow, Bram Kincheloe. Basically, I just forgot about it. I remember when I stopped doing it, I made a conscious effort to tell myself that I had been leading and starting bands for my entire career. If I didn’t stop that, I would become one of those people that are control freaks.I wanted to branch out and see what other bandleaders’ styles were. I also wanted to check out my own bass playing and give it a real chance when I wasn’t the one calling all the shots. Fast forward eight years, I’m listening to this music and thinking, “Oh man! I like this stuff. It’s so good.” I totally forgot about all of it.  While listening to a few of the songs I was thinking, “I wrote that?”I reached out to a few people that I’ve been wanting to play with, and they all said, “yes.” They are all great guys and amazing players. The goal now is to put this music in their hands and let it breathe. There’s a lot of room for stretching out, and we plan to do a lot of the ‘anything can happen’ attitude with the music. Hopefully, everything will happen.L4LM: You have a few shows slated for July with possibly more in the fall. Is that the plan?JM: That is the plan. We’re working on some more dates in September right now. We’re going to look at more in October. I’m hoping to do a couple weekends every month once we get going, and hopefully, record in the winter.I have a lot going on. Basically, I’m home a lot of the time. I’m still on the road quite a bit, but it’s more of little quick runs on weekends. Being home, I’ve had a chance to really spend a lot of time working on music production, mixing, writing stuff of my own, and working with other writers. You have a lot less time to think when you’re sitting in a van.L4LM: Do you have anything going on during festival season? Are there any projects or collaborations you are working on throughout the summer?JM: As of now, I have one thing booked with a band called The Mammals. They’re up in Woodstock, New York. They put on a festival called The Hoot, which is at the end of August. That’s what I’ve got for festival stuff right now. Next summer, I would love to hit festivals with Big Words in between Dirty Birds dates.The line-up for Big Words for their upcoming shows on July 14th and 15th will consist of Myers on bass, Danny Mayer of The Eric Krasno Band on guitar, Chris Bullock of Snarky Puppy on sax, and Bill Carbone of Max Creek on drums. For more information on Big Words, and how to get tickets for their upcoming shows, please visit their Facebook page.  To check out their music, head over to their BandCamp page to take a listen.Words by Sarah Bourquelast_img read more

John Mayer Sings Oteil Burbridge’s Praises In Sirius XM Radio Interview

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first_imgLast weekend, John Mayer called into SiriusXM’s Tales From The Golden Road to chat about Dead & Company’s summer tour, which came to a close ahead of 4th of July at Wrigley Field in Chicago. During his interview with hosts David Gans and Gary Lambert, in addition to talking about his own upcoming solo plans, Mayer spent much of the time heaping praises both onto Dead & Company as a project and onto his individual band members and specifically, bassist Oteil Burbridge.Dead & Company Recaps Tour Success, Sets Attendance Record for Wrigley FieldEchoing the thoughts of many fans who caught the Grateful Dead-inspired ensemble on the road this summer, Mayer emphasized a newfound cohesion amongst the members of the band, stating, “So many discoveries took place this tour. This is the tour we became a unit, a band, instead of a project.” Mayer then noted, “Oteil and I clicked in a way we never had before. . . . It’s like our own little cell that we have on that side of the stage now.”Here’s Everything We Learned From Dead & Company Bassist Oteil Burbridge’s Reddit AMAFrom there, the interview shifts to Oteil Burbridge as a singer, with Mayer reiterating the power of Oteil’s voice and praising the bassist for his vocal leads during this past tour. “To sing with such purity, I don’t really know who to compare it to. Perfect pitch, by the way. . . . [Oteil] just goes up and he’s such an open channel. . . . He almost sings like a horn player, he’s beautiful, languid. We’re all listening to each other play now and enjoying it like it’s the best seat in the house. His ability to deliver a song and a lyric, it’s just beautiful,” noted Mayer. In context of the vocal abilities of the group as a whole, Mayer stated, “That’s exactly what you want in a band, a wrecking crew who can each take on a song or a certain group of songs with their strengths.”From there, John Mayer and the hosts began speaking about the Oteil-led “Fire On The Mountain” from the final night at Wrigley Field, with Mayer identifying it as “a pivotal moment” for Dead & Company. Mayer continues, “There was a moment where Oteil took ‘Fire On The Mountain,’ and it became Oteil’s ‘Fire On The Mountain.’ It was almost like a glimpse at what will be the full second-generation version of the Dead with Oteil’s infusion of his DNA into ‘Fire On The Mountain. . . . He took it and made it into something that was so perfect and unlike anything we’d ever played before. It was really a revelation the way that that went down.”Dead & Co Closes Summer Tour With Sunshine Daydream Fireworks Spectacle At Wrigley [Videos]You can listen to the excerpt from John Mayer’s interview on Sirius XM’s Tales From the Golden Road below, courtesy of Oteil Burbridge.[Photo: Phierce Photo]last_img read more

EXCLUSIVE: New Folk Duo, Mapache, Talks New Album, Chris Robinson, & More [Album Stream]

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first_imgMapache, the Californian duo of Clay Finch and Sam Blasucci, creates a sound that transcends time. There is a charm to Mapache’s music—it’s simple, but in the best way. Their folk songs paint pictures, deliver listeners back to a simpler time, and create a softness that lingers, offering stripped-down and beautiful cowboy-esque tunes about love left somewhere else.Recently, the group released their self-titled debut album on the Spiritual Pajamas label. While some of the songs on Mapache whisper the delicateness of love and pleasure, others like “Mountain Song” evoke playfulness and a sense of youth. As a whole, the album offers a feeling of effortless “chill” that could have only been born in California. These vibes paired with their nostalgic crooning is a surprising and authentic combination.Listen to Mapache’s self-titled debut album, and read our interview with Clay and Sam below.<a href=”http://mapachesounds.bandcamp.com/album/mapache”>Mapache by Mapache</a>Live For Live Music: Tell me a little bit about Mapache and the band’s history?Sam Blasucci: We met in high school. We had a couple different projects we worked on together, but we eventually parted ways. Clay went to school in Northern California and then I spent two years in Mexico. Clay and I regrouped two years ago when we started Mapache.L4LM: What are some of your musical influences?SB: We listen to a lot of old country and old bluegrass stuff, plus the kind of psychedelic country stuff. Eventually, other influences started to come in, like the California stuff, like The Grateful Dead and The Byrds, Gram Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers, Jefferson Airplane. We also listen to a lot of Latin music too.Clay Finch: There’s a lot of stuff too that doesn’t come through in the music as much. Some of my favorites are Stevie Wonder, Leon Russell, and people like that who are a different genre than our stuff but still big influences.L4LM: Your new album just came out, and your music is refreshingly simple. What gave you the confidence to keep it simple? SB: To me, it just feels really good to play that way. It’s easy and doesn’t take much production. We have our guitars, and we sing.  It’s a really rewarding way to make music, and it feels really good. People dug it so we kept doing it.CF: When we play, it’s just to two of us, so we wanted to make a record that was somewhat similar to our live performances. We didn’t want to trick it out with too many bells and whistles. We didn’t need too.L4LM: Where did you record your new album? How long did it take and what was that process like? SB: It took a lot of time for it to come full circle, and it actually took a lot longer than I thought it would. We did half of the album in three days at Valentine Recording Studio here in Los Angeles. We spent a long time mixing and overdubbing and doing other things at Lone Palm studio in L.A. with Dan Horne, who is the producer. He is a very sweet man. That whole experience was one for the books.L4LM: Is there a song on the album that is very representative of you guys as a band? SB: That’s a hard question. They all kind of represent us in their own way. The song “Chico River” is about the time Clay spent in Chico, the time we both spent there. The song “Saltillo” is very representative of when I lived in Saltillo, Mexico. Yeah, so they all kind of express different parts of our lives in different ways. It’s hard to pick one.L4LM: How do you know Chris Robinson?SB: We played a couple shows with Chris through (((folkYEAH!))) Events. He booked us on a couple things, and we got along with him really well, so he’s been helping out a lot too.L4LM: Why is music important to you guys? CF: Well, I think if I weren’t playing music I would probably be doing something that makes me sadder than I am right now, so it’s important for my own wellbeing. But also, any sort of groundbreaking or spiritual experience, any sort of light that has come into my brain, has been through music or inspired by it, and that’s something I’ve tried to pay attention to.SB: I think it is important too because it’s a sophisticated art form. People use music to express more sophisticated ideas. People can try to do that other art forms, but music is extra accessible. Elements of the fine art world can keep people out, and these other types of art can be exclusive. Music has always been something that is super human and doesn’t leave people out.L4LM: Sam you spent time in Mexico did you learn anything musically there?SB: For the most part, what is well-known down there is totally different than what I grew up listening to here, so there was a wide range of things to learn. Even the things they sing about are so different than what we would hear in a pop song here. A lot of old Boleto music and Mariachi music, the lyrics are so intense and so romantic in a way. For example “I have been crying my entire life, and now that you left me, I will be crying for eternity.”L4LM: That sounds like a Pablo Neruda poem. SB: Totally! It’s totally that vibe, and I really like him. I mean, if you listen to our modern pop music here, the topics are very different.L4LM: Have there been any moments where you’re like, “Wow, this is happening”?CF: I mean being so young and inexperienced, kind of everything that’s happening has been like that. On this last tour with the Allah Las, they played bigger theaters and stuff. When you walk out and people clap and it’s full, it’s pretty mind-blowing.L4LM: What’s next for you guys?SB: We are going to Colorado next week and play a couple cities there. We’re going to Utah and Idaho and Seattle. It is a week-long run with Mandolin Orange.last_img read more

NYC’s Bowery Ballroom & Mercury Lounge Team Up With Live Nation

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first_imgAs reported by The New York Times, today the news broke that the massive entertainment giant Live Nation has teamed up two renowned independent New York clubs: the Bowery Ballroom and the Mercury Lounge. Michael Swier, founder of both the Bowery Ballroom and the Mercury Lounge, and Live Nation offered a joint announcement today, noting that they’d be creating a new promotion and booking company called Mercury East Presents. Mercury East Presents will see the Bowery and the Mercury aligning with Live Nation’s own Irving Plaza, Gramercy Theater, Warsaw, and Ford Amphitheater at Coney Island Boardwalk, with the multiple venues sharing “expertise and marketing.”Recently, large-scale entertainment companies such as Live Nation and AEG have been scrambling to consolidate independent venues in local markets. For example, AEG recently bought the Bowery Presents—a partnership that included Terminal 5, the Music Hall of Williamsburg, and a number of other East Coast clubs—as well as joined with the owners of Barclays Center to purchase and renovate Webster Hall. Live Nation, in addition to this recent deal involving Mercury East Presents, has similarly been moving to acquire independents, with 2016 seeing the company purchase the Governors Ball.AEG’s purchase of Bowery Presents had previously left many wondering the fate of the Bowery Ballroom, considering it was not a part of AEG’s deal. The Bowery Ballroom and the Mercury Lounge’s booking and marketing agreement with Bowery Presents ended on Sunday, which opened the door for Live Nation’s purchase and the announcement today. The Mercury East deal, as told by the New York Times, “also includes support in putting on concerts at major venues like Madison Square Garden and Radio City Music Hall, and in working with the promoters behind the Governors Ball.”As Mr. Swier, who will retain ownership of the clubs he founded, shared his thoughts on the deal with the New York Times, “The way the landscape has changed these days, with consolidation, this is the counterbalance one would need to exist and compete with the formidable Bowery Presents-AEG alliance. … Going it alone was not an option.” He continued, “They haven’t totally taken away the indie mind-set. … That is my core.”[H/T NYT]last_img read more

Good News! Preservation Hall Jazz Band Just Got Its Iconic Tuba Back

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first_imgBen Jaffe’s tuba has been a fixture in the Preservation Hall Jazz Band for some time, so New Orleans music fans around the world were shocked and saddened to hear that it was stolen following a concert at the New Orleans’ Music Box Village last month. Well get ready for some good news, folks, because we are excited to report that the iconic instrument is now back at Preservation Hall.Jaffe, who acts as the band’s creative director as well as its tuba/double bass player, revealed the news on Facebook earlier today. While the tuba apparently suffered some damage during its time away from home, Jaffe made it clear that its nothing they can’t fix with a little bit of a love.The instrument couldn’t have turned up at a better time, as the band is gearing up for three shows in Austin, TX as part of this week’s SXSW festivities. One of those gigs will take place this Thursday (March 15th) at Willie Nelson’s Luck Ranch, where Preservation Hall Jazz Band will join a bill that includes Nelson, Kurt Vile, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Hiss Golden Messenger, Josh Ritter, and many more.Of course, it should be noted that the instrument didn’t exactly turn up. No, it was reunited with its rightful owners thanks to an anonymous tip from someone who gave a damn. So kudos to you, anonymous tipster! We may never know your name, but your kind deed will not be forgotten.last_img read more