People on the move

by ,

first_imgMill HouseInns has announced its senior management team, including the appointment of SueNewton as HR director. Newton will work with managing director Keith Henesy,commercial director Steve Pocock and operations director Andrew Jones. Previous Article Next Article People on the moveOn 5 Dec 2000 in Personnel Today Energycompany BG Group has appointed Peter Duffy group director of HR. Duffy,vice-president of HR with Detroit-based TRW Automotive Electronics, will leadHR operations for the company’s 3,800 employees. Duffy, who has been with TRWsince 1999, has also been HR director of Lucas Varity Electrical andElectronics Systems and with British Aerospace in various senior HR positions. Oldham NHSTrust has made several personnel changes. Tom Brogan has moved from head of personnelservices to director. Julia Wright has moved from personnel manager to deputydirector of personnel services. Jayne Pritchard has moved from personnelofficer to personnel manager and Kirsty Wood has moved from assistant personnelofficer to personnel officer. Alison Brophy has been appointed personnelofficer and Catherine Cook had been appointed assistant personnel officer.There is also a new medical staffing and recruiting officer, Lindsay Welsby,reporting to Sue Tinkler, medical staffing and recruitment manager. JohnSteele, group HR director of British Telecom, has been appointed by Trade andIndustry Secretary Stephen Byers to serve on the Acas Council. He is joined bythree new council members, William Coupar, chairman of the DTI Partnership FundAssessment Panel, James Knapp, general secretary of the National Union of Rail,Maritime and Transport Workers, and Veronica McDonald, deputy general secretaryof the STUC.center_img Dr RosalindBergemann is the new vice-president of HR with Gemini, based in Cambridge. Shejoins the company, which represents Gemini Genomics, from the Thomas CookGroup, where she was head of group reward and benefits. Bergemann was alsoappointed a fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts,Manufactures and Commerce in September by the society’s president the Duke of Edinburgh. Comments are closed. ParityResources, the UK IT resourcing and recruitment division of Parity Group, hasnamed Jeff Brooks resourcing service director. Brooks, who will be responsiblefor bid management and agency management service, joins from Amdahl, where hewas responsible for developing the company’s resource centre from conception toan international turnover of £14m over three years. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

US payroll and coaching experts gain best pay rises

by ,

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. US payroll and coaching experts gain best pay risesOn 3 Jul 2001 in Personnel Today Specialists in payroll, training and diversity in the US received the bestpay rises in HR in 2000, according to research. The joint research by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) andWilliam M Mercer shows that technical trainers’ pay has increased by 15.2 percent last year to around $58,100 (£41,000) while diversity managers’ pay hasgone up 11.5 per cent to around $90,000 (£64,000). The more widespread HR roles saw a wide range of median pay increases,ranging from 8.7 per cent for a payroll manager to 2 per cent for acompensation analyst or HR generalist. Lower-level positions, including administrative, clerical, and generalistroles, received pay increases of 2 per cent or less. Patricia Schaeffer, senior compensation consultant at William M Mercer,said, “The economic uncertainty appears to be holding down pay increasesin certain areas where qualified HR talent is more readily available, includingmany of the entry-level positions. “However, in certain areas – including jobs requiring specialisedskills, such as corporate security and HR information systems – pay rose at afairly brisk pace.” Several new roles were included in the survey, including immigration andexpatriate services manager and HR service centre representative. Debra Cohen, director of research for SHRM, said, “These new jobsreflect the evolving role of HR. The increasing globalisation of the workforcehas caused a number of companies to create new positions specifically to dealwith immigration and expatriate issues. The addition of the service centrepositions reflects the new and different ways that HR delivers services to itscustomers.” The survey gathered data from 1,156 companies and 103 different HR roles,ranging from senior management to clerical positions. www.shrm.orglast_img read more

Nurses demand a share of NHS Budget billions

by ,

first_imgNurses are demanding pay rises funded by the billions of pounds the Government has earmarked for NHS modernisation.The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) hinted at strike action if some of the Budget cash was not used to increase pay.Beverly Malone, general secretary of the RCN, said she wanted to see a bumper investment in nursing and that money was needed most.Malone said last year’s pay increase was inadequate, as the 3.9 per cent hike only improved the typical nurse’s salary by around £9 per week. She said retention rather than recruitment was the key to NHS success, but money was essential to achieving improvements in both.Her calls come on top of negotiations for flexible working and contracts. The money from the Budget will raise NHS spending by £40bn in the next six years and it is anticipated that spending for this year will be £5bn up on last year.weblink www.rcn.org.uk Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Nurses demand a share of NHS Budget billionsOn 30 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Poor feedback fails to guage staff opinions

by ,

first_img Previous Article Next Article Poor feedback fails to guage staff opinionsOn 28 May 2002 in Personnel Today Employers at many of the UK’s biggest companies have little idea how theirstaff view their organisation because of poor internal communication. Research by Henley Management College and the Blue Rubicon consultancyreveals that although almost 76 per cent of companies canvass opinion from theworkforce, most fail to get an accurate picture of staff perceptions about theorganisation. The survey of 70 FTSE 250 firms finds 56 per cent do not know whichemployees intend to stay with the company and 54 per cent are unaware howcompany decisions affect staff behaviour. Senior management still has little idea what most employees think, with 68per cent of respondents unsure if staff are co-operative and 62 per centuncertain if employees feel loyal to the firm. Blue Rubicon managing director Fraser Hardie said HR departments are notasking the right questions in employee surveys and the process is one-sided. “The most acute impact is felt during periods of major change or duringrestructuring. “The consequences are that strategy takes a lot longer todeliver,” he said. Despite this uncertain picture, almost half of the HR departments in thestudy said they expect internal communication budgets to be frozen or cut. www.henleymc.ac.uk Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Statement from Kevin Curran, GMB General Secretary Elect

by ,

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Statement from Kevin Curran, GMB General Secretary ElectOn 17 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. My election is a victory for GMBmembers. They have spoken and told us that they want a union that isdemocratic, transparent and open. That is what I have been elected to do, and Ipromise every GMB member that is what I will work every day to achieve.”I would like to give mythanks to every single GMB member who used their vote. I would also like toexpress my gratitude to those activists and officers who supported me andoffered their advice and expertise.”I look forward to workingwith Paul Kenny and all of our other colleagues over the next five years. Paulhas good ideas and energy and I am confident that we can work together todeliver for our members.”There are so many things todo but I am ready for the challenge ahead. The priorities that concern ourmembers and those that I campaigned on – employment rights, pensions, equalityand opposition to privatisation of public services – will be my priorities inoffice.”I also want to begin adebate about taking our union and the political debate away from London andinto all of our regions.”I want to deconstruct therole of a trade union general secretary – and make myself and the unionaccessible to our members at every level. This will include taking tradeunionism into our communities on a level and scale unprecedented in our history.”I will, as promised,institute a membership-led review of our relationship with the Labour Party.This will begin in summer 2003 and all aspects of our relationship will be upfor debate.”Under my leadership, I wantevery member, shop steward, staff member and officer to feel valued and arespected part of our union. I will be putting forward proposals on measuresthat enable us to better consult and listen to all of our people.”The GMB will appoint anindependent commission in the next few weeks. That independent commission willbe tasked with examining the role and structures necessary for modern tradeunions. The commission will take evidence from any member, shop steward, memberof staff or officer that would like to put their ideas forward. It will have awide ranging remit, and I expect it to put forward ideas and proposals to bringabout a new, modern, form of trade unionism. I want a union that retains ourvalues and builds on the things we do well but also begins to address the needsof the modern workplace and those who work in them.”By Ross Wigham Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Managing absence is biggest HR headache

by ,

first_imgManaging absence is biggest HR headacheOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Absence management rather than stress management is the most pressingworkplace headache for UK HR managers. A study by the journal IRS Employment Review has found that almost one infive HR managers believed absence was the most difficult aspect of their worklast year. In the public sector, the proportion of HR managers citing absence as thesingle most challenging area of their work rose to nearly 30 per cent. And mostHR professionals – almost 90 per cent of the 432 managers polled – believedline managers did not like managing absence. Its finding is backed by research in Occupational Health’s sister title PersonnelToday, which found that between 66 and 76 per cent of HR professionals believetheir line managers are ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ when it comes to absence managementand a range of other key skills. www.irsemploymentreview.comlast_img read more

Ageism limits opportunity for both the young and old

by ,

first_imgAgeism has become such a problem in the UK that the average worker has awindow of just five years in which they are deemed neither too old nor tooyoung by employers. New research shows that staff are seen as too young at the age 35, but tooold by 40, while a fifth of all employees have been discouraged from apotential role because of age restrictions. Evidence from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD)and the Department for Work and Pensions shows that age prejudice is much worsefor staff over the age of 40 – although one in 12 of under-35s have also beendiscriminated against. Dianah Worman, a diversity expert at the CIPD, warned employers to startchanging their ways or risk legal action when European legislation banningageism comes into force in 2006. Under the new laws employers will be acting illegally if age prejudiceaffects recruitment decisions and Worman warned firms to start preparing forthe changes immediately. “Waiting for legislation will be too late, and may leave companiesexposed to legal risks,” she said. “Employers will need anunderstanding of how to manage, recruit, reward, train and motivate employeesacross all age ranges.” Sam Mercer, director of the Employers Forum on Age (EFA) said the resultshighlighted the extent of the problem and pointed out that people of all agessuffered discrimination. “This highlights the extent of the problem and employers shouldurgently review policies and remove age barriers. It’s not just aboutrecruitment, but everything a company does with its people, so organisationsmust start moving on it now,” she said. In an exclusive interview with Personnel Today last week, pensions ministerMalcolm Wicks said the problem of ageism – which he compared to racial orsexual discrimination – was growing across the workplace. By Ross Wigham Comments are closed. Ageism limits opportunity for both the young and oldOn 13 Jan 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Education entrepreneur relists East Hampton estate for $95M

by ,

first_img Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink hamptons-weeklylong islandThe Hamptonstristate-weekly Chris Whittle and his East Hampton estate (Photos via Trulia and Meridian)The founder of Avenues: The World School has relisted his 11.2-acre East Hampton estate with a major price cut as he faces a potential forced auction to repay debts to his former company, according to the Wall Street Journal.Chris Whittle, who left the posh private school company in 2018, is now asking $95 million for the property. It hit the market in 2014 for $140 million, but has been off the market for a few years.Avenues Global Holdings, the company that owns the private schools Whittle founded, said last year that he hasn’t repaid millions of dollars it lent him in 2013.A spokesperson said that Whittle owes the company $6.7 million and hasn’t made a payment since 2019. The spokesperson also said the Suffolk County Sheriff’s office would publish an auction notice soon. Such a sale could take place as soon as April unless Whittle repays his debts. [WSJ] — Dennis Lynch Tagslast_img read more

Thyroid hormone responses to prolonged cold exposure in man

by ,

first_img1. Four men, of ages varying from 23 to 28 years, living at Halley Bay, Antarctica (75° 31′ S, 26° 39′ W), were exposed to a mean air temperature of 6·6° C. 2. The concentration of serum triiodothyronine (T3) rose significantly by the second day, remained raised, and returned to pre‐exposure levels within 2 days of return to a normal environment. 3. The concentration of serum thyroxine (T4) rose more slowly than did the T3, reaching a maximum in 3‐4 days and also returning to normal within 2 days of return to a normal environment. 4. There was a wide individual variation in the change of concentration of serum cortisol.last_img

On the mechanism of crustal block rotations in the Central Andes — Comment

by ,

first_imgIn this paper Beck (1998)reviews the database of palaeomagnetically observed rotations in the Andean margin of South America, in particular with respect to the well known change in sense of rotation linked to the Arica deflection (Bolivian Orocline) in the orogen. The paper argues firstly for the latitudinal distribution of rotations supporting an interpretation that distributed shear combined with oroclinal bending is the best hypothesis to explain the observed pattern of rotations and secondly that this rotation/deformation is time-dependent. While we essentially agree with the former conclusion we would define it more tightly in that the over-arching control on the pattern of rotations is a combination of differential shortening, as opposed to oroclinal bending, along the orogen coupled with distributed shear across the orogen. Our main concern with this paper is that it fails to provide a convincing demonstration that there is a time-dependent element to the magnitude of rotations. Primarily we will argue that it is far from clear from the palaeomagnetic data presented that there is a case for a continuous rate of rotation applicable to the southern limb of the orocline, at least. Not withstanding this we would also argue that geologically the deformation cannot and should not be described by a continuous deformation rate over time, as postulated. We also make specific points about aspects of the paper dealing with the Atacama Fault Zone and its relation to the observed rotations.last_img read more