Category Archives: dropb

Ageism limits opportunity for both the young and old

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first_imgAgeism has become such a problem in the UK that the average worker has awindow of just five years in which they are deemed neither too old nor tooyoung by employers. New research shows that staff are seen as too young at the age 35, but tooold by 40, while a fifth of all employees have been discouraged from apotential role because of age restrictions. Evidence from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD)and the Department for Work and Pensions shows that age prejudice is much worsefor staff over the age of 40 – although one in 12 of under-35s have also beendiscriminated against. Dianah Worman, a diversity expert at the CIPD, warned employers to startchanging their ways or risk legal action when European legislation banningageism comes into force in 2006. Under the new laws employers will be acting illegally if age prejudiceaffects recruitment decisions and Worman warned firms to start preparing forthe changes immediately. “Waiting for legislation will be too late, and may leave companiesexposed to legal risks,” she said. “Employers will need anunderstanding of how to manage, recruit, reward, train and motivate employeesacross all age ranges.” Sam Mercer, director of the Employers Forum on Age (EFA) said the resultshighlighted the extent of the problem and pointed out that people of all agessuffered discrimination. “This highlights the extent of the problem and employers shouldurgently review policies and remove age barriers. It’s not just aboutrecruitment, but everything a company does with its people, so organisationsmust start moving on it now,” she said. In an exclusive interview with Personnel Today last week, pensions ministerMalcolm Wicks said the problem of ageism – which he compared to racial orsexual discrimination – was growing across the workplace. By Ross Wigham Comments are closed. Ageism limits opportunity for both the young and oldOn 13 Jan 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

USA: MSC Ships Deliver Cargo for Operation Deep Freeze Antarctica

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first_img View post tag: ships View post tag: MSC USA: MSC Ships Deliver Cargo for Operation Deep Freeze Antarctica View post tag: deliver View post tag: Freeze View post tag: cargo View post tag: Navy View post tag: Antarctica April 4, 2013 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: operation Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: MSC Ships Deliver Cargo for Operation Deep Freeze Antarctica View post tag: Naval View post tag: deep Military Sealift Command-chartered ships concluded cargo operations April 2 in Port Hueneme, Calif., for Operation Deep Freeze, the annual Joint Task Force Support for Antarctica.MSC-chartered container ship MV Ocean Giant arrived in Port Hueneme March 27 and began offloading more than 500 pieces of cargo.The cargo included containers filled with retrograde materials such as trash and recyclable materials for disposal and rolling stock equipment removed from the remote scientific outpost at McMurdo Station Antarctica. In addition to the retrograde materials, ice-core samples were delivered for future use by scientists who study the global climate.Reserve Sailors from Expeditionary Port Unit 114 served as the pierside liaison between the ship, cargo handlers and the National Science Foundation personnel during the offload. “Operation Deep Freeze is a mission of teamwork; teamwork between the personnel and the climate,” said Larry Larsson, an MSC military transportation specialist. “This season we achieved uncommon results, in a very challenging location. It was a fantastic effort by all who supported ODF and a true example of our motto, MSC delivers,” he said.One of two MSC-chartered ships supporting this year’s ODF operations, Ocean Giant was accompanied in Antarctica by MSC-charted ship MV Maersk Perry. Perry provided 100 percent of the diesel fuel, jet fuel and gasoline needed for the sustainment of the station through the harsh winter period. The Perry also provided fuel for the National Science Foundation’s chartered scientific research ship R/V Nathanial B. Palmer and the ice-breaker I/B Vladimir Ignatyuk.An MSC-chartered cargo ship and tanker have made the challenging voyage to Antarctica every year since the station was established in 1955.MSC operates approximately 110 non-combatant, civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world and move military cargo and supplies used by deployed U.S. forces and coalition partners.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, April 4, 2013; Image: View post tag: usa Share this articlelast_img read more

Denmark promotes industry in US aboard HDMS Peter Willemoes

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first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Denmark promotes defense industry in US aboard HDMS Peter Willemoes Denmark promotes defense industry in US aboard HDMS Peter Willemoes Industry news Danish government and industry representatives are hosting a maritime and naval event aboard a Danish Navy frigate that is visiting Baltimore, USA, on November 17.During its two-day visit to Baltimore, HDMS Peter Willemoes will host an event headed by Troels Lund Poulsen, Danish minister for business and growth, Danish ambassador to the United States, Lars Gert Lose, and Rear Admiral, Frank Trojahn, Chief of Naval Staff.According to Danish defense company Terma, U.S. Admiral John Richardson, Chief of Naval Operations and Mac Thornberry, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee are expected to visit the event.“Terma highly welcomes this excellent opportunity to demonstrate key technologies and products including our competences within command & control, surveillance and sensors, and naval self-protection technologies,” Thomas Leistiko, vice president, sales, command, control & sensor systems, said.“We look forward to demonstrating our solutions in their natural environment on board the ship,” Leistiko added.HDMS Peter Willemoes is the second of three Iver Huitfeldt-class air defense frigates which are considered to be the most powerful ships in the Royal Danish Navy. The 138-meter ships were built at the Odensee Steel Shipyard, part of Maersk Group, at a cost of US$325M per ship.The frigates’ armament consists of several different missiles, anti-submarine torpedoes and machine guns. November 17, 2016 View post tag: US View post tag: HDMS Peter Willemoes View post tag: Danish Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

Finsbury appoints new finance director

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first_imgFinsbury Foods has appointed Stephen Boyd as its new group finance director, with immediate effect. Boyd has previously held key positions at WT Foods, Noon Products and Golden Wonder, where he worked alongside current Finsbury chief executive John Duffy.He replaces Lisa Morgan, who will step down from the board with immediate effect and will leave the company following a hand-over period, which is expected to be completed by the end of March 2010. Boyd most recently worked at Food Investors LLP, which invests in private equity-backed businesses, where he also acted as a consultant to assist in enhancing company performance.“We are very pleased that Stephen will be joining the Finsbury family and I look forward to working with him once again. He will be a great asset to the group and we will reap the benefits of his extensive industry experience,” commented Duffy.The cake, bread and morning goods manufacturer also announced it is continuing to trade in line with market expectations.last_img read more

Crosstown Doughnuts trials ‘dark retail’ delivery hubs

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first_imgSource: Crosstown DoughnutsCrosstown Doughnuts is trialling a ‘dark retail’ delivery model in Cambridge and Walthamstow.The ‘dark retail’ sites – locations without a shopfront where goods are packed for delivery – will act as decentralised hubs for on-demand deliveries and collections, with customers in those locations able to get doughnuts delivered to their doorsteps in under an hour.Cambridge represents Crosstown’s first venture outside of London since it launched in 2014.If successful, the business plans to expand the delivery hub model to other areas within reach of central London, such as Oxford, Brighton, Richmond, Croydon, Chalk Farm and Chiswick.All sites will be served by its London-based bakery which will deliver doughnuts fresh each morning.The business has seen direct-to-consumer (d2c) online ordering revenues increase by 600% compared to 2019, it added. This has largely been supported by the introduction of nationwide delivery in August 2020, an expanded gifting offer, and a delivery hub pilot in Battersea.“Since launching delivery in August 2020, we have been able to identify a number of hotspots with a high demand of Crosstown products. Assuming the new locations go as anticipated, we hope to continue to reach our customers in this new manner, with locations such as Brighton and Oxford high on our list,” said JP Then, co-founder of Crosstown.“As we have seen in our Battersea location, low cap-expenditure opportunities paired with the right enabling technology can offer exceptional opportunities for growth.”The popularity of the ‘dark’ or ‘cloud kitchen’ model is expected to continue to boom, it added.Band togetherCrosstown has partnered with other independent operators in Cambridge and Walthamstow.“There has never been a more important time for independent operators to band together – all three of these new delivery hubs are utilising unused space from friendly operators who are looking to put a basement, a mezzanine or a spare first floor area to work. We are open to discussions with anyone who may find this arrangement mutually beneficial to drive growth whilst keeping costs down for both parties,” added Adam Wills, co-founder of Crosstown.The first site is based in the Crate building on St James Street, Walthamstow. Consumers can place online orders via eCommerce solution Slerp from 9am-8pm seven days a week. Cambridge will initially be a four-week residency on All Saints Passage in the city centre, launching in March.last_img read more

John Mayer Sings Oteil Burbridge’s Praises In Sirius XM Radio Interview

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first_imgLast weekend, John Mayer called into SiriusXM’s Tales From The Golden Road to chat about Dead & Company’s summer tour, which came to a close ahead of 4th of July at Wrigley Field in Chicago. During his interview with hosts David Gans and Gary Lambert, in addition to talking about his own upcoming solo plans, Mayer spent much of the time heaping praises both onto Dead & Company as a project and onto his individual band members and specifically, bassist Oteil Burbridge.Dead & Company Recaps Tour Success, Sets Attendance Record for Wrigley FieldEchoing the thoughts of many fans who caught the Grateful Dead-inspired ensemble on the road this summer, Mayer emphasized a newfound cohesion amongst the members of the band, stating, “So many discoveries took place this tour. This is the tour we became a unit, a band, instead of a project.” Mayer then noted, “Oteil and I clicked in a way we never had before. . . . It’s like our own little cell that we have on that side of the stage now.”Here’s Everything We Learned From Dead & Company Bassist Oteil Burbridge’s Reddit AMAFrom there, the interview shifts to Oteil Burbridge as a singer, with Mayer reiterating the power of Oteil’s voice and praising the bassist for his vocal leads during this past tour. “To sing with such purity, I don’t really know who to compare it to. Perfect pitch, by the way. . . . [Oteil] just goes up and he’s such an open channel. . . . He almost sings like a horn player, he’s beautiful, languid. We’re all listening to each other play now and enjoying it like it’s the best seat in the house. His ability to deliver a song and a lyric, it’s just beautiful,” noted Mayer. In context of the vocal abilities of the group as a whole, Mayer stated, “That’s exactly what you want in a band, a wrecking crew who can each take on a song or a certain group of songs with their strengths.”From there, John Mayer and the hosts began speaking about the Oteil-led “Fire On The Mountain” from the final night at Wrigley Field, with Mayer identifying it as “a pivotal moment” for Dead & Company. Mayer continues, “There was a moment where Oteil took ‘Fire On The Mountain,’ and it became Oteil’s ‘Fire On The Mountain.’ It was almost like a glimpse at what will be the full second-generation version of the Dead with Oteil’s infusion of his DNA into ‘Fire On The Mountain. . . . He took it and made it into something that was so perfect and unlike anything we’d ever played before. It was really a revelation the way that that went down.”Dead & Co Closes Summer Tour With Sunshine Daydream Fireworks Spectacle At Wrigley [Videos]You can listen to the excerpt from John Mayer’s interview on Sirius XM’s Tales From the Golden Road below, courtesy of Oteil Burbridge.[Photo: Phierce Photo]last_img read more

The Observer announces new department heads

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first_imgSeven new and two returning department heads will complete The Observer’s 2016-2017 Editorial Board, incoming Editor-in-Chief Margaret Hynds announced Wednesday night. The new department editors will join Hynds as well as incoming Managing Editor Kayla Mullen and Assistant Managing Editors Clare Kossler, Zach Klonsinski and Alex Carson in running editorial operations for the paper.Juniors Erin McAuliffe, Jimmy Kemper, Wei Cao and Caitlyn Jordan, sophomores Katie Galioto, Nicole Caratas, Marek Mazurek, Susan Zhu and freshman Claire Radler will take over their respective departments March 13.McAuliffe, a junior in Pasquerilla East Hall, will continue to serve as Scene Editor. A marketing major with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy, she began writing for Scene her freshman year. Originally from Cincinnati, McAuliffe is also a WVFI DJ.Kemper, a native of Alpharetta, Georgia, will begin working as Web Editor. He began writing for Scene his freshman year and has covered a variety of arts and entertainment topics, including Taylor Swift’s business relationship with Spotify and Kanye West’s shoes. Kemper, a resident of Zahm House, is an economics and English double major. Cao will continue to work as Multimedia Editor. An aerospace engineering major and Walnut, California, native living in Dillon Hall, Cao has been with The Observer since his freshman year. He has his own art blog and plays the tuba in the marching band. Jordan will join the Editorial Board as Photo Editor. The Saint Mary’s junior hails from Ashburn, Virginia, and lives in Le Mans Hall. Jordan is a communication studies major with a minor in film studies. She works with photography and video media and hopes to pursue a job in filmmaking. Galioto, a resident of Walsh Hall, will head the News department. She began her work with The Observer in fall of 2014 and has since covered a variety of campus issues, including the ESPN lawsuit and Mental Health Awareness Week. Galioto hails from Chanhassen, Minnesota, and is pursuing a degree in finance with minors in Italian and journalism, ethics and democracy.Caratas, a native of Lake Villa, Illinois, currently living in Holy Cross Hall, will take over as Saint Mary’s Editor. Caratas is a sophomore English writing and humanistic studies double major. She has been writing for The Observer since her freshman year, covering issues such as Title IX and “The Hunting Ground” documentary. Mazurek will take on the position of Sports Editor. A Mishawaka resident, he currently resides in Carroll Hall on campus. He is pursuing a degree in history with a minor in journalism, ethics and democracy and has been writing for The Observer since his freshman year. He currently covers men’s basketball and has previously covered women’s soccer and cross country. Radler, the incoming Viewpoint Editor, began working for The Observer this fall as a copyeditor for the department. Currently living in Pangborn Hall, she was born and raised in Winnetka, Illinois.  She is a freshman English and political science double major and also works for the First Year of Studies. Zhu, originally from Granger, will assume the role of Graphics Editor. A resident of Ryan Hall, she has been a graphic designer for The Observer for two years. She is a chemistry and political science double major and also works for the Snite Museum of Art. Tags: department editors, Editorial Board, Observer editorial boardlast_img read more

Deodar Cedar

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first_imgJust over four years ago, I wrote an article titled “Deodar Cedar, simply unbeatable in the winter landscape.” That still holds true, but I would like to suggest a new title: “‘Patti Faye’ deodar cedar, simply unbeatable in the landscape.”Every day, as I come into the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia, and as I leave, I watch ‘Patti Faye,’ which is the most unbelievable Christmas-tree-shaped conifer for the Southern garden. I’ll admit I have been partial to the Japanese fir, Abies firma, as the most exquisite Christmas tree for the South, but not anymore.The heritage of ‘Patti Faye’ is connected to Afghanistan, but ‘Patti Faye’ is really a Southern girl from Mobile, Alabama. In 2000, Ralph Rushing discovered a group of seedlings and he named it after his wife, Patti. When you have a classic conifer with outstanding performances in places like Mobile and Savannah, you know it’s a keeper.‘Patti Faye’ is cold hardy through zone 7, which represents a wide swath of the country. If you live in a colder zone, you may want to try the ‘Shalimar’ deodar cedar, which is known for its extra cold-hardiness. ‘Patti Faye,’ however, has stolen my heart with its blue needles and horizontal branching habit.Most deodar cedars have pendulous branching that is ever so graceful, but this is what makes ‘Patti Faye’ so incredible. Also called the “Himalayan cedar,” the deodar cedar does have the ability to reach 40 to 50 feet with a 30-foot spread.Conifers, or cone-bearing trees or shrubs, are the ones that stand out when everything else goes brown or dormant. They are so important to the winter landscape and give us that needed evergreen structure. Of course, with ‘Patti Faye,’ this foliage or needles are steel blue.Deodars are still mostly sold generically, which is OK, but keep your eyes open for the named selections like ‘Patti Faye;’ ‘Aurea,’ which is smaller, reaching to 30 feet and has golden yellow new foliage; and ‘Pendula,’ which has long, weeping branches and grows no taller than 10 feet. Don’t forget ‘Shalimar,’ which was released by the Arnold Arboretum and is known for superior cold hardiness for landscapes in zone 6.Another variety we have in the garden that is a most pleasant surprise is ‘Snow Sprite.’ This variety is a dwarf, weeping type that seems like it would be happier farther north. Its origination is Vancouver, Canada, but it has done wonderfully in Savannah. This white-tipped deodar cedar reaches 4 to 6 feet in colder climates after 10 years, but we have reached that in less than four years in Savannah. I expect the weeping characteristics will now become more pronounced.Deodar cedars are fairly fast growing for the first decade or two, reaching as high as 30 feet in the first 10 years. I think it is most beautiful at this stage. Between years 10 and 20, it will slowly broaden at the top. Older specimens generally show some top dieback, but don’t let this keep you from experiencing 10 to 20 years of deodar cedar heaven in your landscape.Deodar cedars perform best in full sun and are drought tolerant once established. This tree likes well-drained locations. Most deodar cedar cultivars will grow into large, handsome specimens that need plenty of room. You’ll want these in the back of a large landscape so they can be seen in their entirety. Otherwise, choose a variety for that perfect spot in your landscape. Follow me on Twitter: @CGBGgardenguru.last_img read more

Video Clips of the Week: Mountain Biking, Kayaking, and Fishing Stereotypes

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first_imgThis week’s Clips of the Week starts with a throwback. If you haven’t seen this mountain biking video before, you’re in for a treat. Check it out:This is probably illegal, and most likely going to ruin the bottom of your kayak, but it’s undeniably awesome. Something tells us these guys know how to party:Everyone knows someone that fits these stereotypes, even if it’s yourself:last_img

Boost your brand with event ATMs

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first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Branding is about much more than just a company logo; it is about communication with consumers and the surrounding community. Brand reflects how we differentiate from competitors and startups. Consequently, brand awareness is one of the most vital points of marketing strategy. According to research, consumers that recognize a brand are more likely to see it as a familiar, dependable and safe option.Every brand strategy should have consumer awareness at its center. Branding event ATMs is affordable, can create a positive experience for fair and festival goers, and can expose the brand to a large number of consumers at one time in one place. Bank customers and credit union members will appreciate being able to perform surcharge-free transactions, and this type of branding can lead to loyal and dedicated accountholders that will turn to the sponsoring credit union for their banking needs.Here are three ways to use event ATMs to help boost your brand exposure:1.    Provide accountholder perks. Consumers, especially millennials, approach banking with a “what’s in it for me” mentality. If a credit union offers surcharge-free ATM transactions a community event, members have convenient access to cash and may recognize the credit union’s good will. In addition to strengthening the loyalty of existing accountholders, it also advertises membership perks to non-members. continue reading »last_img read more