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EXCLUSIVE: New Folk Duo, Mapache, Talks New Album, Chris Robinson, & More [Album Stream]

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first_imgMapache, the Californian duo of Clay Finch and Sam Blasucci, creates a sound that transcends time. There is a charm to Mapache’s music—it’s simple, but in the best way. Their folk songs paint pictures, deliver listeners back to a simpler time, and create a softness that lingers, offering stripped-down and beautiful cowboy-esque tunes about love left somewhere else.Recently, the group released their self-titled debut album on the Spiritual Pajamas label. While some of the songs on Mapache whisper the delicateness of love and pleasure, others like “Mountain Song” evoke playfulness and a sense of youth. As a whole, the album offers a feeling of effortless “chill” that could have only been born in California. These vibes paired with their nostalgic crooning is a surprising and authentic combination.Listen to Mapache’s self-titled debut album, and read our interview with Clay and Sam below.<a href=”http://mapachesounds.bandcamp.com/album/mapache”>Mapache by Mapache</a>Live For Live Music: Tell me a little bit about Mapache and the band’s history?Sam Blasucci: We met in high school. We had a couple different projects we worked on together, but we eventually parted ways. Clay went to school in Northern California and then I spent two years in Mexico. Clay and I regrouped two years ago when we started Mapache.L4LM: What are some of your musical influences?SB: We listen to a lot of old country and old bluegrass stuff, plus the kind of psychedelic country stuff. Eventually, other influences started to come in, like the California stuff, like The Grateful Dead and The Byrds, Gram Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers, Jefferson Airplane. We also listen to a lot of Latin music too.Clay Finch: There’s a lot of stuff too that doesn’t come through in the music as much. Some of my favorites are Stevie Wonder, Leon Russell, and people like that who are a different genre than our stuff but still big influences.L4LM: Your new album just came out, and your music is refreshingly simple. What gave you the confidence to keep it simple? SB: To me, it just feels really good to play that way. It’s easy and doesn’t take much production. We have our guitars, and we sing.  It’s a really rewarding way to make music, and it feels really good. People dug it so we kept doing it.CF: When we play, it’s just to two of us, so we wanted to make a record that was somewhat similar to our live performances. We didn’t want to trick it out with too many bells and whistles. We didn’t need too.L4LM: Where did you record your new album? How long did it take and what was that process like? SB: It took a lot of time for it to come full circle, and it actually took a lot longer than I thought it would. We did half of the album in three days at Valentine Recording Studio here in Los Angeles. We spent a long time mixing and overdubbing and doing other things at Lone Palm studio in L.A. with Dan Horne, who is the producer. He is a very sweet man. That whole experience was one for the books.L4LM: Is there a song on the album that is very representative of you guys as a band? SB: That’s a hard question. They all kind of represent us in their own way. The song “Chico River” is about the time Clay spent in Chico, the time we both spent there. The song “Saltillo” is very representative of when I lived in Saltillo, Mexico. Yeah, so they all kind of express different parts of our lives in different ways. It’s hard to pick one.L4LM: How do you know Chris Robinson?SB: We played a couple shows with Chris through (((folkYEAH!))) Events. He booked us on a couple things, and we got along with him really well, so he’s been helping out a lot too.L4LM: Why is music important to you guys? CF: Well, I think if I weren’t playing music I would probably be doing something that makes me sadder than I am right now, so it’s important for my own wellbeing. But also, any sort of groundbreaking or spiritual experience, any sort of light that has come into my brain, has been through music or inspired by it, and that’s something I’ve tried to pay attention to.SB: I think it is important too because it’s a sophisticated art form. People use music to express more sophisticated ideas. People can try to do that other art forms, but music is extra accessible. Elements of the fine art world can keep people out, and these other types of art can be exclusive. Music has always been something that is super human and doesn’t leave people out.L4LM: Sam you spent time in Mexico did you learn anything musically there?SB: For the most part, what is well-known down there is totally different than what I grew up listening to here, so there was a wide range of things to learn. Even the things they sing about are so different than what we would hear in a pop song here. A lot of old Boleto music and Mariachi music, the lyrics are so intense and so romantic in a way. For example “I have been crying my entire life, and now that you left me, I will be crying for eternity.”L4LM: That sounds like a Pablo Neruda poem. SB: Totally! It’s totally that vibe, and I really like him. I mean, if you listen to our modern pop music here, the topics are very different.L4LM: Have there been any moments where you’re like, “Wow, this is happening”?CF: I mean being so young and inexperienced, kind of everything that’s happening has been like that. On this last tour with the Allah Las, they played bigger theaters and stuff. When you walk out and people clap and it’s full, it’s pretty mind-blowing.L4LM: What’s next for you guys?SB: We are going to Colorado next week and play a couple cities there. We’re going to Utah and Idaho and Seattle. It is a week-long run with Mandolin Orange.last_img read more

Harvard Global Institute grants expand scope

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first_imgIn its third year of awarding grants, the Harvard Global Institute (HGI) will fund eight projects that engage faculty across six Harvard Schools and extend its geographic scope and research capacity.The Harvard Global Institute was established by President Drew Faust in 2015 to promote University-wide, interdisciplinary scholarship on pressing global challenges. With support from the Dalian Wanda Group and its chairman, Wang Jianlin, HGI is funding ambitious projects that bring together Harvard faculty and Chinese collaborators to research matters related to air quality, climate change, biodiversity, health, and urbanization.While three projects will focus on topics that are particularly relevant to China, five will address issues that are salient to India. Funding for the India research grants is provided by the President’s Global Initiatives Support Fund, established by alumni and friends on the Global Advisory Council.Both small and large categories of grants are awarded, at a maximum of $100,000 and $1 million per year, respectively.This year’s grant recipients:Eugene Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, proposes an investigation of the sources of human consciousness, meditation and mindfulness, and the relationship between art and technology by focusing on the experience of viewing the Buddhist caves of Dunhuang, China. Wang intends to “elucidate the mural and sculptural program of embellished Buddhist caves” by creating an educational film that demonstrates how the Buddhist mind works in caves.Peter Bol, Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and James Hankins, professor of history, propose a comparative study of the means used by various historical societies to improve the moral and intellectual quality of political elites via education, customs, culture, and institutions. They hope to use the insights of modern Confucian political philosophy to illuminate the issues involved, while also supplying theorists with the fruits of historical research, particularly which means for improving moral and intellectual leadership have proven most successful in past societies.In a project titled “A New Strategy for the U.S. and China: Joint Research on Air Pollution and Climate Using Innovative Airborne Instrumentation,” Professors James Anderson and Frank Keutsch propose developing a joint strategy for obtaining reliable observations of the key processes controlling concentrations of pollutants relevant to human health and climate. The work will lay the foundation for longer-term collaboration and launching future joint (airborne) field campaigns. Future advances in instrumentation will then contain contributions from both sides, as will defining and solving the key scientific questions within the context of air pollution and climate. Anderson is Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Keutsch is Stonington Professor of Engineering and Atmospheric Science and professor of chemistry and chemical biology.Co-investigators Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, and David Jones, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine, will conduct historical research to understand the distinct but linked histories of air pollution and heart disease over the past decade in India. Their analyses of the shifting causes of air pollution, the ways in which it became a cause of public concern, governments’ responses to that problem, and the prospects for successful reform should provide valuable guidance for policy makers today — in India and other developing countries. The investigators will collaborate with the Public Health Foundation of India to make this connection between history and policy.Jacqueline Bhabha, professor of the practice of health and human rights, and Aisha Yousafzai, associate professor of global health, will research interventions that pre-empt and eliminate harm to vulnerable children by evaluating prevention strategies used by three innovative nonprofits in India. There is a clear and pressing need for evidence that supports such interventions to protect children. The project aims to further our practical understanding of what “prevention” entails and how it can be operationalized at the local level, providing an evidence-based case for increased investment in such programs. It aims to develop a methodological approach to “prevention science” that will spark further global research in this field.Daniel Nocera, Patterson Rockwood Professor of Energy, and Rohini Pande, Mohammed Kamal Professor of Public Policy, will bring Nocera’s clean-energy innovation — the “bionic leaf” — together with Pande’s policy research to inform the adoption of the clean energy generated by the bionic leaf in India. The collaboration will not only set the stage for the successful introduction and scaling of bionic leaf technology in India, but also create the framework to accelerate the adoption of greenhouse-gas-reducing innovations in the future.In her project “Coal-based Energy Generation in India: Managing Local and Global Environmental and Human Health Impacts,” Elsie Sunderland and her collaborators in India will test the hypothesis that health impacts attributed to coal-fired power plants have been substantially underestimated because they do not include damages associated with toxic heavy metal exposures. Coal-fired power generation accounts for approximately 70 percent of India’s energy demands, and is presently increasing at a rate of 3.5 percent per year to meet the needs of a growing population. However, most Indian plants still lack even basic pollution control technology. The proposed research will combine field measurements, modeling, and exposure analysis in two Indian cities that have large residential communities next to coal-fired power plants. Sunderland is Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering.Faust also awarded a grant to Emmerich Davies, assistant professor of education. His project, “Power to the Parents: Local Community Participation in Delhi Schools,” aims to test the impact of two separate interventions to encourage greater parental participation in school management committees. These interventions look to increase the diversity of parents who run for elected positions on school management committees, as well as encourage broad-based participation in these bodies, with the ultimate goal of improved educational outcomes.HGI will accept expressions of interest for the next grant cycle in December. Once again, there will be a small amount of funding available for projects in India. HGI will also welcome projects with a China-India comparative component. More information on grants and the upcoming grant cycle can be found on the HGI website.To read about 2015 and 2016 grant recipients’ projects, visit the HGI website.last_img read more

Buffalo Bills Win First Playoff Game In 25 Years After Topping Colts 27-24

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first_imgBuffalo BIlls Quarterback Josh Allen. Buffalo Bills vs Indianapolis Colts, Super Wild Card Game, January 9, 2021 at Bills Stadium. Photo by Bill Wippert / BuffaloBills.com.ORCHARD PARK – The Buffalo Bills won their first playoff game in 25 years after defeating the Indianapolis Colts 27-24 on Saturday afternoon.Dawson Knox (88) touchdown celebration. Buffalo Bills vs Indianapolis Colts, Super Wild Card Game, January 9, 2021 at Bills Stadium. Photo by Bill Wippert / BuffaloBills.com.The matchup kicked off the NFL’s expanded wild card weekend. This is the first time since 1996 that the Buffalo Bills hosted a playoff game.The Indianapolis Colts visited Buffalo in the first of three games Saturday. The Bills earned the No. 2 seed in the AFC’s seven-team playoff field behind Kansas City.That game will be followed by two NFC games: the Rams visit Seattle and Tom Brady leads the Tampa Bay Buccaneers against Washington. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Squigs Hikes the Hills of Ireland for a Portrait of Outside Mullingar

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first_img About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Outside Mullingar Show Closed This production ended its run on March 16, 2014 Star Files Related Showscenter_img View Comments It’s one of the hottest Broadway tickets this winter, but lucky Broadway.com artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson snagged a seat to see Emmy winner Debra Messing, Tony winner Brían F. O’Byrne, Peter Maloney and Tony nominee Dearbhla Molloy in the world premiere of Outside Mullingar. Manhattan Theatre Club is presenting Tony, Oscar and Pulitzer Prize winner John Patrick Shanley’s new romantic comedy, which tells the tale of two withdrawn eccentrics who have spent their lives on neighboring farms in rural Ireland. Although the pair attempts to connect, a simmering feud between their two families threatens to keep the frightened souls apart. Check out Squigs’ heartrending sketch of O’Byrne and Messing (in her Broadway debut) as the two you’ll be rooting for, with Maloney and Molloy looking on. Well, what are you waiting for? Go see Outside Mullingar at the Friedman Theatre, opening January 23! Debra Messinglast_img read more

BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF VERMONT ANNOUNCES DISTINGUISHED EMPLOYEE FOR MAY AND JUNE 2006

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first_imgBLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF VERMONT ANNOUNCES DISTINGUISHED EMPLOYEE FOR MAY AND JUNE 2006Berlin, VT Becky Law, a resident of Northfield, VT, and Rus Franswick, a resident of Johnson, VT have been chosen as distinguished employees for the months of May and June 2006 respectively.Ms. Law is a mail/micrographics processor II in the mail and micrographics unit and has been with Blue Cross and Blue Shield since 2002. She is cited for her leadership qualities, her dedication, and her willingness to help her co-workers. A co-worker states, She takes the time to make sure everybody knows what they are doing and that everything is running smoothly.Mr. Franswick is a communications specialist in corporate communications. He has been employed at Blue Cross and Blue Shield since 1988. He is cited for his extensive knowledge, his dependability, and his outgoing personality. A co-worker states, Rus is dependable, reliable and constant.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont employs about 350 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and its branch office in Williston. A committee of employees recognizes an employee each month in honor of Carol L. Goodrich, the winner of the first-ever Employee of the Year award in 1992. This program awards individuals who demonstrate extraordinary effort above and beyond the scope of their current responsibilities. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external). Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.(End)last_img read more

Operation Martillo makes huge cocaine seizure

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first_img SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic – A joint, international counter-narcotics operation seized more than 1,134 kilograms of cocaine, worth an estimated US$37 million, from a speedboat south of the Dominican Republic, the U.S. Coast Guard said Jan. 28. The shipment, which was confiscated on Jan. 22 but not announced until this week when the drugs were offloaded in Miami Beach in the U.S. state of Florida, marked the largest takedown in months as part of Operation Martillo, an international mission to prevent trafficking via maritime channels. “This historic operation is a result of a dedication to improved interoperability and highlights the great success and commitment of our interagency partnerships to stop the illegal flow of narcotics into the United States,” Rear Adm. Jake Korn, commander of the Coast Guard Seventh District, said in a prepared statement. The seizure started when a Coast Guard aircraft spotted the go-fast boat in waters south of the Dominican Republic early on Jan. 22. Four people were aboard a boat carrying suspicious packages, according to the Coast Guard. The British Royal Navy ship RFA Wave Knight – operating in the Caribbean as part of the Operation Martillo – was called to assist. A Coast Guard helicopter was launched from the Wave Knight and began firing warning shots at the speedboat. Instead of stopping, the crew continued, throwing bales of suspected narcotics overboard. The helicopter fired at the boat, disabling it. A Coast Guard crew traveling aboard the Wave Knight boarded the vessel and detained the four men, whose names were not released. Meanwhile, a second boat was launched to recover about 45 bales of cocaine weighing at least 1,134 kilograms. The Coast Guard put the shipment’s wholesale value at about US$37 million, but the Royal Navy said the cocaine could have been worth nearly three times that amount if it had reached the streets of Great Britain. “RFA Wave Knight, working seamlessly with the U.S. Coast Guard, has demonstrated her capability and resolve to disrupt the illicit drug trade. On this occasion, a significant amount of Class A drugs has been stopped from reaching the streets of the UK and USA,” Capt. Duncan Lamb RFA, Wave Knight’s commanding officer, said in a prepared statement. The Royal Navy said its ships have taken part in seizures of illicit drugs worth an estimated US$380 million this winter alone. “Once again, the Royal Navy has played a key role in the international mission to tackle the drugs trade from the Caribbean,” British Defense Secretary Philip Hammond said of the latest bust in a prepared statement. The United Kingdom and U.S. Coast Guard teamed in late December to confiscate 250 kilograms of marijuana from a dilapidated fishing vessel in the Caribbean. The crew of five was detained and the drugs, worth an estimated US$1.5 million, were turned over to authorities. Operation Martillo, which is led by the U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force South and includes Canada, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain and the United Kingdom, strives to disrupt transnational criminal organizations by limiting their ability to use Central America as a transit zone. Since it was launched in January 2012, teams confiscated 278,611 kilograms of cocaine and 27,556 kilograms of marijuana, arrests 620 suspects and seizing 205 vessels in the process, the U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force South calculated earlier this month, before the latest bust. More than two-thirds of the 444 events carried out under Operation Martillo involved multi-nation assistance or support, which officials said is key to its success. “Overall, this mission has a high operational tempo. It’s up to us to keep the pressure on,” Cmdr. Lance Lantier, the USS Rentz’s commanding officer, said in a prepared statement earlier this month. The USS Rentz has confiscated 3,000 kilograms of cocaine during the past four months, he said. “The success of [our most recent] operation reflects our continued commitment to countering the flow of illegal narcotics while maintaining a forceful presence,” Lantier added. By Dialogo January 30, 2014last_img read more

Narcotrafficking Is Venezuela’s War Weapon in the Region, Experts Say

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first_imgBy Gonzalo Abarca and Nathaly Salas Guaithero / Voice of America December 16, 2019 The tentacles of narcotrafficking in South America have reached into all sectors of society and in some cases, have defeated entire governments that now sponsor the activity and attempt to destabilize the region, analysts interviewed by Voice of America say.Martín Rodíl, a specialist in organized crime and narcotrafficking, says that Venezuela went from being a country with the presence of narcotrafficking groups to a “narcostate” under former President Hugo Chávez (1999-2013).“What’s new is the role of Venezuela as a state and not as a country with criminal organizations, but as a state sponsoring them,” said Rodíl in VOA’s program Inter-American Forum.Analysts agreed that the Venezuelan and Cuban governments sponsor cocaine trafficking to finance destabilizing operations in countries of the region and undermine the continent’s democratic institutions.Hugo Chávez, the ghostFor Leandro Coutinho, writer and investigative journalist who specializes in transnational crime and hemispheric security, Venezuela is more than a narcostate.“In Venezuela, the destructions come from narcotraffickers. The Venezuelan state carries out narcotrafficking,” Coutinho added.Coutinho insists that Chávez was the main architect behind the new narcotrafficking routes, while the current regime of Nicolás Maduro continues to operate them.“Chávez has created a very important cocaine route toward the Northern Triangle, toward Central America and Mexico. He did so jointly with Cuba, as a way to destabilize the region and affect the United States,” the expert said.Coutinho warned that narcotrafficking causes instability and chaos, undermining the institutional foundations of democracies. “Narcotrafficking is a war weapon. That’s how Fidel [Castro] won Hugo Chávez over.”New mix: State, narcotrafficking, invasionsVíctor Amram, retired commissioner of Venezuela’s Scientific, Criminal and Forensic Investigations Corps, said Chávez created what is known today as a “modern narcostate.”“What Chávez did was to take advantage of Venezuela’s corruption, the deterioration that already existed, and then polished and improved it. Chávez was the instigator of this mix of networks: drugs, narcotrafficking, corruption, and political and military invasions,” said Amram.Everybody’s fightThe experts agreed that the fight against drugs led by the United States, is the responsibility of the entire continent.The moral imperative, they said, is a unified fight with all countries working side by side against a common enemy: narcotrafficking.“We need to stop saying that the United States is losing the war against narcotrafficking,” Rodíl said. “We are all losing it.”Rodíl added that the narcotrafficking issue cannot be left to the United States alone.“Venezuela lost the day it let someone like Hugo Chávez take office and turn the Venezuelan state into a sponsor for criminal activity, such as narcotrafficking,” he concluded.last_img read more

It’s all about attitude

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first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr New research from Stanford University shows that attitude is a better predictor of success than intelligence.The study found that peoples’ attitudes fall into one of two categories: a fixed mindset or a growth mindset.Forbes contributor Travis Bradberry explains in a recent article, “People with a growth mindset believe that they can improve with effort. They outperform those with a fixed mindset, even when they have a lower IQ, because they embrace challenges, treating them as opportunities to learn something new.”Luckily, a growth-oriented mindset can be developed. Bradberry suggests:– Don’t remain helpless. “[I]n order to be successful, you need to be willing to fail hard and then bounce right back,” he writes. continue reading »last_img read more

Iberia roundup: Spanish funds make ‘significant’ recovery after March rout

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first_imgJose Marques, Willis Towers WatsonAt end-March 2020, debt formed 64% of Portuguese pension fund portfolios, including 34% held directly in government bonds, according to data from regulator ASF and from the Association of Investment Funds, Pension Funds and Asset Management.Equities made up 18% and real estate 12% of portfolios at that date.Marques told IPE: “I believe most pension funds in Portugal are recognising the difficulty of making predictions about the future, and therefore avoiding big tactical positions based on uncertain forecasts.”He added: “We have noticed a significant increase of interest from pension funds in ensuring that they have diversified portfolios that are more resilient to market falls, and not so reliant on equity returns and interest rate levels.”To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here. The Q1 losses brought the average annualised returns for Spanish occupational funds to -0.58% for the three years to end-March 2020, and 0.03% for the five-year period to that date, said Inverco.The PIPS survey showed that median returns for Q1 2020 were -8.6%. The survey covered a large sample of pension funds, most of them occupational schemes.Bellavista told IPE: “Non-euro equity exposure, which has been growing in the past five years to represent around 50% of the equity exposure, has been the main driver of return during this V-shaped recovery, performing better than euro equity.”However, he said non-euro fixed income was the main asset contributing a positive return for the year to date, although other fixed income growth assets such as credit and high yield had also made positive returns in the past two months.And he added that within alternatives – still with low allocations in most corporate pension funds, but being built up – assets such as private equity or certain hedge fund strategies are also contributing positive returns for the year to date.In terms of asset allocation, he told IPE: “Some funds have taken quick decisions to seize the opportunity offered by widening credit spreads, and have increased allocation to credit and high yield, reducing their cash exposure.”Meanwhile, according to Inverco, non-domestic equities continued to be the largest asset class for pension funds as a whole, although the allocation fell to 20% of assets over the first quarter. The equity allocation also fell, to 32.2% of assets.Fixed income rose over the first quarter, to 46.4% of portfolios, with Spanish government bonds still the biggest segment, at 19.4% of assets.Inverco said that at the end of March, total assets under management for the Spanish occupational pensions sector stood at €33.1bn, a 4.7% decrease over the past year.Portuguese funds pull back -8.1% Q1 lossPortuguese occupational pension funds recovered most of their first-quarter losses during April and May, as both equities and credit quickly rebounded after COVID-19 shocks, according to José Marques, director of retirement at Willis Towers Watson (WTW).The market slump had led to an average return of -8.1% for Portugal’s occupational pension funds over the first quarter of 2020, according to the consultants. This compared with an average return of 1.2% for Q4 2019.The 12-month return to 31 March 2020 was similarly affected by market volatility, with a -4.4% result, compared with 8.2% for calendar 2019, when markets had performed spectacularly well.Even longer-term results were negative: -0.6% annualised for the three years to end-March 2020, and -0.4% for the five years to that date.Performance figures were submitted to WTW by around 75% of the pension funds in Portugal, the overwhelming majority of them occupational funds.Marques said that during the first quarter, government bonds from core countries such as the US, UK and Germany performed very well, as investors sought safer assets.He added: “Public debt from non-core European countries such as Portugal, Spain and Italy had poorer performances, and this affected some pension schemes in Portugal who tend to have an overweight to domestic public debt.”However, government bonds from countries not perceived as safe havens contributed to the recovery in the following two months, Marques said. Spain’s occupational pension funds have made a “significant” recovery since March, with an estimated return of 3.4%, according to Mercer’s Pension Investment Performance Service (PIPS).This brings the year-to-date performance at end-May 2020 to -5.5%, said Xavier Bellavista, principal at the consultancy.Market volatility had led to negative results for Spanish occupational pension funds in the first quarter of 2020, giving an average -4.26% return over the 12 months to 31 March 2020, according to the country’s Investment and Pension Fund Association (Inverco).This compared with a gain of 8.7% for calendar 2019.last_img read more

Head Energy to hook up two wells on Wintershall Dea’s Brage platform

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first_imgGerman oil and gas company Wintershall Dea has awarded a contract for two well hook-ups at the Brage platform offshore Norway to engineering and consulting company Head Energy.Brage platform; Image: Wintershall DeaHead Energy said in a statement on Tuesday that the engineering phase would start immediately.Head Energy’s engineering director Øyvind Reksten said: “This is a strategically important contract for us and a recognition of our skilled engineering team working with EPCIC offshore modification projects.“We look forward to continuing our good cooperation with Wintershall Dea and contribute to increased production at the Brage Platform.”Brage is Wintershall Dea’s first manned platform in Norway. Located in the northern North Sea, 125 kilometers west of Bergen, it is one of the oldest producing platforms in Norway. First discovered in 1980, the field came into production in 1993 and has been in operation for more than 25 years.The German company took over operatorship of Brage in 2013 as part of an asset swap with Equinor, then Statoil.Brage is a fully integrated platform with living quarters, auxiliary equipment module, process modules, drilling modules, well and manifold areas. The cabin capacity is 130 people.Brage has been developed as a fixed integrated production, drilling, and accommodation facility with a steel jacket. The main drainage strategy is water injection, with gas lift utilized in most wells. Oil is exported via the Oseberg transport system to the Sture terminal and the gas is exported via a pipeline to Kårstø.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more