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Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko Architects

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first_img Area:  180 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects CopyAbout this officeNeil Dusheiko ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsConcreteBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentLondonEnglandUnited KingdomPublished on December 20, 2016Cite: ” Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko Architects” 20 Dec 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalSystems / Prefabricated PanelsKalwall®Translucent WalkwaysPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesIsland Exterior FabricatorsSpecialty Facade SystemsLightsLouis PoulsenLamps – LP Slim BoxWoodBruagAcoustic Panels with LEDTiles / Mosaic / GresiteHisbalitMosaic Tiles – Palm SpringsMineral / Organic PaintsKEIMBlack Concrete – Concretal®-BlackSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Smart CeilingsDoorsGorter HatchesFloor Door – Fire RatedBricksDEPPEWaterstruck Bricks – 1622/1635ekws DFMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?伦敦的小洋楼 Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko建筑事务所是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Photographs:  Tim Crocker , Agnese Sanvito Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko ArchitectsSave this projectSaveBrackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko Architects Houses 2015 Photographs CopyHouses, Refurbishment•London, United Kingdom “COPY” ArchDailycenter_img Save this picture!© Tim Crocker+ 23 Share Brackenbury House / Neil Dusheiko Architects Manufacturers: Lazenby, EKS, ParkwoodCity:LondonCountry:United KingdomMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Tim CrockerRecommended ProductsWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesPorcelain StonewareCeramiche KeopeCeramic Tiles – BackPorcelain StonewareCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Chromica CollectionDoorsLonghiDoor – HeadlineText description provided by the architects. IntroductionThe project is a remodelling and extension to a house in a conservation area for a young family. The Brackenbury House forms part of a terrace of five Lillian Villas built in 1879. The “L” shaped double-fronted villas are brick and stucco faced, two-storey high, with front gardens forming a landscaped frontage, set back from the street. Save this picture!© Tim CrockerClient’s BriefDutch born, Niels Swinkels works for Universal Pictures and is passionate about the aesthetic of sci-fi films. Erica Swinkels [Swedish / British], asked for a palette of natural earthy materials and was keen for us to retain as much of the existing fabric of the building and re-cycle it as we reconfigured the house to make it work better for them as a family.Save this picture!© Tim CrockerThe ambitions for the project were high in terms of achieving open plan, visually connected spaces to allow for a greater sense of communication between the different rooms. The client wanted to make the house feel connected to the outside through framed views to the garden and to allow as much natural light in as possible.Save this picture!© Tim CrockerMaterials and Spatial StrategyOur design adds a new basement and rear extension, providing an expanded living and kitchen space, sky lit sun-filled bathrooms, a home cinema, playroom and guest bedroom. We sought to create an innovative design solution – rethinking the basement typology in a contemporary way to ensure it was both a light-filled but could also be used in a multi-functional way – as a playroom for their young son or a sophisticated cinema viewing room. Save this picture!© Agnese SanvitoThe conceptual approach was to create a calm atmospheric interior using carefully selected unified palette of materials stitching the modern design into its historic context within the conservation area. Materials work well together due to the inherent relationships between re-used historic materials juxtaposed with modern industrial elements.Save this picture!SectionThe new basement area is lit by large skylights cut into the floors above. All levels are opened out to allow the existing rooms of the Victorian house to give way to an open plan interior on the ground floor and tall loft like spaces upstairs. The kitchen and living rooms open out to a south-west facing patio, creating a strong connection between house and garden. Save this picture!© Tim CrockerAll the ceilings in the upper floors were removed, allowing the tall loft-like ceiling spaces to be exposed with large skylights flooding the home with natural light. The bathrooms are top lit by generous skylights linking bathing spaces to the sky above.Save this picture!© Tim CrockerProduct Description. Although one does not often associate home refurbishments with sustainable design; our practice worked hard to embed sustainable principles and products into the design at the early stages in the project. We re-used as much of the existing fabric of the house as possible – the existing bricks of the house were carefully stored during the demolition stage for re-use to construct the new extension. The recycled Hammersmith stock bricks from the existing house are used to create the new extension linking the memory of the old house to the new design. A feature brick wall in the living area extends down to the basement through the skylight visually connecting the two levels. The new rear façade is constructed out of recycled brick and is tied to the existing flank wall with a sensuous curved brick detail. The use of lime mortar ensures future re-use of the brick is still possible.Save this picture!© Tim CrockerThe upgraded insulation and heating systems to the property allowed us to include larger areas of glass to the rear facade. We placed the glazing elements, glass doors and skylights on the south / east to maximise the potential solar gain and reduce the amount of mechanical heating needed during the day as well as cutting down on the need for artificial lighting.Save this picture!© Agnese SanvitoAll the external walls are heavily insulated with robust airtightness details to minimise heat loss throughout the fabric of the building. All glazing was upgraded to high quality thermally broken double glazed argon gas filled units.Save this picture!© Tim CrockerA walk-on glass floor allows one to see from the ground floor to the basement playroom as well as allowing light to enter the basement through the tall foldaway glass doors. The glass doors fold away completely linking the kitchen, courtyard and living room. Views to the sky are created at the landings to all the staircases. The bathrooms are top lit by generous skylights allowing one to bath under the stars. The large glazed units meant that a house that was previously dark and pokey was now a light filled space.Save this picture!© Tim CrockerWe embedded underfloor heating pipes within the polished concrete floor due to its good thermal mass and heat retention qualities. We also used an air exchange system in the basement that allows for a constant feed of fresh air from the outside and recycled all the heated air back into the house before it is exhausted outside.Project gallerySee allShow lessInside the Murphy House, RIBA’s 2016 House of the YearArchitecture NewsGrant Opportunity for Mid-Level Career ArchitectsOpportunities Share Year:  United Kingdom ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/801350/brackenbury-house-neil-dusheiko-architects Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/801350/brackenbury-house-neil-dusheiko-architects Clipboard “COPY” Architects: Neil Dusheiko Architects Area Area of this architecture projectlast_img read more

Nix ticks

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first_imgIt’s summer, and outdoor activities are on the menu. Make sure you don’t end up on the menu of a blood-sucking travel partner when you are out and about, say University of Georgia experts. “Think of them as little vampires,” said Elmer Gray, a UGA Cooperative Extension entomologist. “All ticks require blood meals to survive and reproduce. And the United States has about 80 species of ticks that can feed on humans and other mammals, reptiles, birds and even frogs.”Ticks common in Georgia are the lone star tick, American dog tick, blacklegged or deer tick and brown dog tick. Transmit diseases”Most people are naturally repulsed by the idea of something sucking their blood,” said Nancy Hinkle, an entomologist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “But ticks do transmit diseases, too.” While tick-borne diseases are relatively uncommon in Georgia, the Georgia Division of Public Health reports 50-80 suspected cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever each year in addition to a few cases of Lyme Disease. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in Georgia. Lone star ticks and blacklegged ticks both can carry human ehrlichiosis, a family of sometimes-deadly diseases with a range of flu-like symptoms.In general, a tick has to be attached to its host for at least 24 hours to transmit disease. “The diseases most often associated with ticks in Georgia are often typified by the onset of flu-like symptoms, including severe headaches, fever, rash and a general flu-like condition,” Gray said. “If you have any of these symptoms following a tick bite or after having been where ticks hang out, see a doctor promptly.”Prevention”Ticks don’t fly, jump, leap or climb very high, so they are seldom found high above ground,” Hinkle said. “They hang on low-growing vegetation, stick out their hook-like claws and when we walk by, they latch on and climb upward.” The best way to avoid tick bites is to stay in areas where the vegetation is open or maintained below ankle height. Walking trails should be kept mowed, and hikers should avoid any vegetation brushing against their legs during the summer. Hinkle recommends treating socks and pant legs up to the knee with products that contain permethrin. For added protection, tuck pant cuffs into your socks. “That keeps ticks on the treated surface and off our skin,” she said.Repellents help reduce the chance of getting a tick bite, too. It’s important to target the feet, legs and waistline when applying repellents.Reduce ticks around the house by keeping grass and brush cut short. Gray said this not only reduces places for ticks to live, but exposes them to sunlight, which can kill them. Use tweezers to remove ticks that are attached to skin. Pinch the tick close to the mouthparts to remove as much as possible. Apply an antiseptic to the site immediately after removing a tick.Check your pooch, tooWhile dogs don’t seem to be affected by Rocky Mountain spotted fever, they can suffer joint pain from Lyme disease, Gray said. And dogs and cats can catch other deadly diseases from ticks. Ask a veterinarian for an appropriate treatment to repel ticks.”Check your pets daily for ticks,” Hinkle said. “Run your fingers through their coat and remove any ticks before they start feeding.”last_img read more

New Date for Edom Fits Biblical Record

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first_imgThe critics were wrong, and the Bible was right, according to new dates established for the kingdom of Edom southeast of the Dead Sea.  This is the gist of a report from UC San Diego that found evidence of extensive copper mining in the area much earlier than previously thought.  The area studied had “been ignored by archaeologists because of the logistical difficulties of working in this hyper-arid region,” but the UCSD team, cooperating with the kingdom of Jordan, succeeded in getting more accurate radiocarbon dates and archaeological evidence from this challenging area.    The team found evidence of two extensive periods of copper production centuries earlier than the previous dates for the Edomite kingdom (8th to 6th century B.C.).  Now, as far back as the 9th to 12th centuries B.C., a new picture emerges:In this period evidence was found of construction of massive fortifications and industrial scale metal production activities, as well as over 100 building complexes.….    These results push back the beginnings of Edom 300 years earlier than the current scholarly consensus and show the presence of complex societies, perhaps a kingdom, much earlier than previously assumed.  Previous investigations in Edom had been carried out in the Jordanian highland zone and had put the rise of the Edomite kingdom during the 8th to 6th centuries B.C.  But the new work presents strong evidence for the involvement of Edom with neighboring ancient Israel as described in the Bible. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The results are published in the current issue of the British journal Antiquity.  Another article about this discovery can be found on South Bend Tribune.Prominent archaeologists like William Dever and Israel Finkelstein had claimed that the Biblical record was inaccurate because no such Edomite kingdom existed back in the times of David and Solomon.  The Tribune article reminds us that “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”  But why should not the Bible be considered evidence?  It has proven correct so many times and places, and proven critics wrong so often, the burden of proof should be on the critics who would deny its accuracy.  Dever himself (a friendly but vociferous rival with Finkelstein over Palestinian chronology) finds this revelation revolutionary, and says it supports the Bible’s credibility about the kingdoms of David and Solomon.  According to the Tribune, he still doubts the historicity of the Exodus, however.  He needs to doubt his doubt.    This announcement is another blow to the “minimalist” school of archaeology (championed by Finkelstein) that considers the Bible just a religious text written much later, and not a reliable guide to the history of the Middle East.  If archaeologists would use the Scriptures as a guide, they might find a lot more out there.  Read the Old Testament for yourself and see: no other ancient book has such detail about events, names, and places.  Unlike the Koran and other religious texts, the Bible is loaded with them – names and events we know thoroughly from independent sources and observation, and some that haven’t been discovered yet.  These references can be considered on their own merits and put to the test of the spade, without making judgments about the spiritual lessons of the Bible.  Over and over again, as here, the Bible passes the test.  Its reliable historical record provides a foundation for the credibility of its other truth claims, because it was clearly written down by men with a high regard for accuracy. (Visited 26 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

What Is the Temperature of the Earth?

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first_img(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The news are all reporting 2014 as the hottest year on record, but no one is asking how such a measurement can be made without bias.“The heat is on: NOAA, NASA say 2014 warmest year on record,” Seth Borenstein states on PhysOrg.  The data videos in the article look pretty conclusive.  But for anyone who thinks scientific conclusions should rest on evidence, not on authority (even prestigious specialty organizations like NOAA and NASA), it might bear examining the question of earth’s temperature from a philosophical viewpoint: How does one measure it?  We can’t put a thermometer under Mother Earth’s tongue.Even when we use a thermometer for a human, we are arbitrarily taking a measurement from one part of the body to the exclusion of others, because we consider it “useful” as a proxy for a person’s health. The reading might be different in the rectum, or the ears, or at the abdomen compared to the extremities. If mouth temperature under the tongue is useful, there is a bit of natural fluctuation around the mean; your temperature is rarely exactly 98.6° F. Scientists know that all measurements involve some degree of error. They use different methods of averaging, such as mean, mode, and median, to select a measurement that is useful for their purposes.The error bars and biases are greatly exacerbated when trying to come up with “a number” that represents a global measurement. For earth’s temperature, consider just a few of the sources of error and bias:Every square mile of the earth’s surface has its own temperature at a given time.  The poles are colder than the equatorial regions.Each point’s temperature is constantly changing.  It’s colder at night than during the day.The temperature varies with height above the surface.  The atmosphere has a temperature profile from ground to stratosphere that, too, is constantly changing.The temperature varies with depth beneath the surface; it’s hotter underground, and colder with depth in the oceans.The weather is constantly changing; air speed and humidity can influence measurements.Surfaces near a thermometer, such as black asphalt or grass, can influence measurements.Each environment has its own thermal inertia.  Some rocks cool down more slowly than other surfaces. The measurement might include some residual heat from the past instead of the current temperature.Humans or machines that read the instruments can make mistakes.There are multiple methods of taking temperature: thermoelectric, mercury and other liquids, or bimetallic strips, for instance. Who decides which type of device to use?If a change in device type is made at a station, or is rolled out at all stations over time, how do measurements with the new device correlate with measurements from the previous device?All recording devices must be calibrated. It becomes difficult to ensure equal calibration for monitoring stations around the world. Some countries could be more careless. Some stations might drop out from damage, neglect, or vandalism.It’s impossible to gather data from every point on the globe, so decisions have to be made about where to put monitoring stations.It’s impossible to gather data continuously from a given monitoring station, so decisions have to be made about what times of day to collect data points.  Should it be daily highs and lows? Or should it be temperatures at noon and midnight? Who decides?Earth’s climate has natural cyclic variations over multiple time scales, some of them poorly known or unknown.This is not a complete list. So what is the “temperature of the earth”? There is no such thing.  There is “a” temperature at “a” place, at “a” time, under certain environmental conditions, at a given humidity and wind speed, as measured by an artificial device that may or may not be calibrated properly and working properly.  By itself, a temperature reading signifies nothing about climate, because it’s trying to measure a moving target in a very small location on a huge planet.It should be obvious that human bias enters every factor. Someone has to decide where to put the monitoring stations, what device to use, and what data points to collect at what times. When the data are in, the numbers must be crunched and the error mitigated according to some model or method. A scientist or a program based on a model may decide to toss out data that appear anomalous according to someone’s criteria, but what if those data points are meaningful? Models and methods are human constructs, devised for their “usefulness” – but even so, models are only simulations of reality, not reality itself. It’s impossible to know all the factors that could influence the results.Much more troublesome is trying to link temperature trends (if they are meaningful at all) to causes.  Seth Borenstein’s article is adamant that humans have caused 2014 to be the hottest year on record. Who could possibly know that? Pictures of smokestacks at power plants can’t prove it; that titillates the emotions by visualization, perhaps, but isolated pictures are not global evidence. Recently, for instance, it was reported that more methane (a potent greenhouse gas) was emitted by earthquakes than previously thought (Science Magazine).  Hardly a month goes by without some new factor being reported that could alter the models’ conclusions.  Here’s one from a few days ago on PhysOrg: “Mountain system artificially inflates temperature increases at higher elevations,” suggesting that “warming in the mountains of the western U.S. likely is not as large as previously supposed.” Here’s another one announced on PhysOrg 11 days ago: “A new NASA-led study shows that tropical forests may be absorbing far more carbon dioxide than many scientists thought, in response to rising atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas.” Examples like this could be multiplied.Sociologists of science probably find it intriguing that the “climate of opinion” on anthropogenic climate change has divided sharply between the “consensus” and the “deniers”.  Both have well-qualified experts to point fingers across the aisle. The point of this analysis is not to take sides, but to point out, from a philosophical perspective, that such answers cannot be known by the methods of science.  There are too many variables.  The error bars are too large.  There are too many unknowns and unknowables. Scientists don’t fully understand all the factors and feedback mechanisms, like clouds, ocean currents and forests, that could alter the models significantly.  Human biases are unavoidable.For example, consensus scientists were caught red-faced when having to admit a 15-year “warming hiatus” since about 1995. They rushed to rescue their conclusions (i.e., about warming being man’s fault) by looking for ad hoc explanations. Here’s one that appeared a few days ago on PhysOrg: “The ‘warming hiatus’ that has occurred over the last 15 years has been partly caused by small volcanic eruptions.”  The article claims, “a series of small 21st century volcanic eruptions deflected substantially more solar radiation than previously estimated.” But this explanation, while giving the consensus a story to tell the press, raises more questions than it answers. What other factors are substantially greater “than previously estimated”? If small volcanoes have this much power to influence the climate in short order, why aren’t the alarmists blaming the volcanoes instead of the power plants?  And if smoke and dust lower the temperature, why isn’t the solution to throw even more soot from power plants into the atmosphere?Consensus scientists know and believe that climate swings greater than anything observed today have occurred naturally in the past. So the current debate reduces to identifying what factors out of large number of possibilities, including unknowns and unknown unknowns, tend to indict human beings for a trend that might be purely natural. Experts in scientific ethics might well ask, also, why warming is such a worrisome thing, if animals and plants thrived in the past under even greater climate swings.When scientific institutions (or consensus deniers) take leave of their empirical modesty and become emotional advocates for causes that cannot be rationalized by scientific methods, even in principle, it’s a good time to ask whether ideology or politics is influencing their behavior.  This goes for Clarke and Lawler, who passionately argued on The Conversation that people need to trust experts, otherwise they are being anti-intellectual. Some questions, though, are not questions of science; they are questions of philosophy about science. Many scientists are not trained to think critically about the limitations of science.Again, this is not to take sides in a “heated” debate, but to step back and look at the debate philosophically. Professor Jeffrey Kasser, in his Teaching Company series on Philosophy of Science, tells a somewhat humorous story about the difficulty of objectively measuring a property of a material, namely “fragility.” It seems simple at first; you hit something, and if it breaks, it’s fragile, right? But what if it breaks only when hit hard, or with a certain kind of object? At the end of a long train of factors to consider, he ends with having to define fragility with a long list of arbitrary methods: you have to hit the object with a standard hammer with a standard whack at a given angle, etc. etc.Even taking the temperature of a room could require a long list of directions that some human had to decide: use a certain kind of thermometer, at a certain height off the floor, holding it with gloves instead of bare hands, and so forth. But then, what kind of gloves, and how thick? Does the measurer have to wear a white lab coat? There are an infinite number of conditions that might change the measurement. We know some are silly and unlikely to affect the outcome, such as what the measurer had for breakfast. But those criteria cannot be defined scientifically; they are arbitrary, based on what the people who define the method consider useful. No human can know all the factors that come into play. And that’s just for measuring a small room. How much more defining the “temperature of the earth.” We hope you see that such a measurement is meaningless!Interestingly, temperature itself is a vexed question. What is it? There are several definitions; motion of molecules, that which feels hot to the touch, that which raises mercury a certain number of millimeters in a tube, etc. But what is temperature? The operationalist Bridgman said, “Temperature is what thermometers measure” (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy). The mathematician Fourier forswore the debate about heat, opting instead to offer an equation that describes what heat does, not what it is.  Often in science, the deeper the questions you ask about seemingly simple phenomena, the more puzzling they become.  Even Newton did not deign to feign what gravity is.  He only described what it does, and what calculations you can make with an equation.Finally, we should think about scientific ethics. Ostensibly, it is the job of a scientist to describe and explain a phenomenon, not to advocate for what politicians should do about it.  So why are all these climate scientists like Michael Mann and his friends warming up to U.N. climate summits and telling them what must be done?  You may agree with him, and it is his right, like any other person’s, to have political beliefs. But to claim a belief about climate change is scientific goes far beyond the ability of science to know. The take-home lesson from this entry is that science is not objective; it is profoundly human, and humans are often driven by ideology.  Don’t be influenced by majorities and pictures and graphs, when the underlying data cannot be conclusive. If it’s consensus, it’s not science; if it’s science, it is not consensus.last_img read more

Blinka.me: If Craigslist’s Missed Connections Got Its Own Website

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first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Duncan Shand, Blinka’s CEO, wrote us in an email, “The core difference with our site over other ‘missed connection’ sites is that we’re not a classified listings site. On Blinka.me you put in your moment. If the other person does too, then our system will register a match based on location and time and automatically send an email notification.“In fact we have a patent pending around the matching method, so if this goes through, things could get interesting.”Shand has been working on Blinka for the past year. The site has been live for 12 weeks and is halfway through its beta testing period.So far, the majority of data is geographically centered in New Zealand and Australia, but more users in the U.S. and other countries would generate more data, add more hot spots, create more moments, and ultimately expand the site’s reach. Blinka has a bright, simple UI that makes the site a pleasure to use. This startup’s success comes down to gaining a critical mass of users who frequent the same pubs or attend the same conferences. We can see the site going over well through a lobbycon campaign at tech conferences, getting inebriated early adopters to sign up, post moments, and reconnect with one another.Check out this video from Blinka, and let us know what you think of this service in the comments. Tags:#start#startups 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts center_img Whether the venue is a local bar or a professional conference, we all meet people whose identities and contact information slip away before we can establish a more meaningful connection.Although missed connections sections in personals and classifieds make for great reading on a boring Tuesday night, some kind of more powerful tool – with a greater share of the market – is needed to act as a beacon between social and professional ships passing in the night. One site among several devoted to this cause is the shiny, new Blinka.me, a very 2.0 version of your local alternative weekly’s back pages.On this site, users are invited to create accounts using Facebook Connect or a manual signup process. They then can share “moments” of various types or browse “hot spots” to find out where locals are meeting and connecting – or missing connections – in a given area. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… jolie odell A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

Indian men’s 4X100m freestyle relay team in final

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first_imgLed by India’s biggest hope in swimming, Virdhawal Khade, the India quartet clocked 3:28.06 to make a cut for the final of the Men’s 4x100m Freestyle relay, after they finished sixth in their event at SPM Aquatics Complex, in New Delhi on Monday.The other three members of the team are Aaron Dsouza, Arjun Jayaprakash and Anshul Kothari.India could make their presence felt in two more categories, even as most of them failed to advance further.In men’s 50m backstroke, Badrinath Melkote clocked 27.52 to qualify for the semifinals, while Subha Chittaranjan clocked 29.96 to enter the last four stage in women’s 50m butterfly.However, India put up a disappointing show in all other categories, including women’s 200m freestyle, men’s 400m freestyle, women’s 200m individual medley, men’s 200m butterfly, women’s 50m breaststroke, as none of the swimmers could qualify in these events.Meanwhile, a formidable Australian team, followed by England and Canada have already established their dominance in the pool.With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

CJ Perez raring to test his mettle vs Chris Ross, Beermen in PBA debut

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first_imgLATEST STORIES Columbian rookie CJ Perez during the opening ceremony of the 2019 PBA season at Philippine Arena. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netCarrying the label of being the top overall pick already comes with tremendous pressure to live up to.CJ Perez, the No. 1 selection by Columbian in last month’s rookie draft, isn’t shying away from that challenge.ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Apart from Perez, Columbian is also banking on its guards Jerramy King and Rashawn McCarthy, who is coming off his best season yet in his first year with the Kia franchise after playing sparingly for San Miguel in his rookie season.“I feel like San Miguel is the measuring stick for everyone especially in the all-Filipino Cup. They’ve won the last four championships,” McCarthy said. “I just love to play against those guys. those are my guys, I love to complete against those guys, it’s always fun.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Broner fires up fight hype In fact, he’s raring to show the PBA what he’s all about even if it means going toe-to-toe with undisputed Philippine Cup king San Miguel Beer in his keenly-awaited pro debut.“They’re the top team and they’re a formidable team. It’s a good opportunity for us to show what we’re capable of,” Perez said in Filipino. “It’s our first game and we’re going to find out what we’re made of.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“I’m excited to face them. They have great point guards in Alex Cabagnot and Chris Ross. Chris Ross is a very good defender so it’s a chance for me to see how far I’ve improved as a player. I’m just really excited,” added Perez, who carried the Lyceum Pirates to back-to-back NCAA Finals appearances.The Beermen are gunning for a fifth straight all-Filipino crown while the Dyip are looking to finally turn their fortunes around this season after languishing at the bottom of the standings year after year. MOST READ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? View commentslast_img read more