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Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste

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first_imgAdvertisement IRISH people are in danger of underestimating their own ability to speak their native language, according to research carried about by a Mary Immaculate College (MIC) researcher. Previous articleMunster’s Gavin Coombes Called Into Ireland CampNext articleCall for innovative ideas to make Limerick city ‘energy positive’ Meghann Scully TAGSGaeilgeIrishKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostMary Immaculate College Indeed, the same study suggests that lack of confidence in the cúpla focal could be linked to an absence of quality feedback in school.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Shane Barry, an Applied Linguistics doctoral student at MIC has drawn the conclusion based on his interviews with current civil servants who were asked to rate their own Irish language proficiency.In his study, he asked participants to evaluate their own ability to speak Irish in a current conversational setting. The research found that 60% of respondents would generally downplay their own abilities but would answer more favourably to specific questions, such as their ability to order a cup of coffee in a Gaeltacht area.Barry suggests that those who claim to have low Irish self-efficacy have generally experienced a ‘lethal combination’ of experiencing poor performances and a lack of feedback during school.Barry explains that the Official Languages Act of 2003, which requires public bodies within the Irish state to provide services through both Irish and English, served as the inspiration behind the study.“A recent official report where sixteen Government departments were surveyed, of which there are over 21,000 employees, revealed that only 2.62% of staff are recognised as having a competence in the Irish language – or in other words, capable of interacting with the public through Irish when required.“The most important implication emerging from my research is that these misaligned self-efficacy beliefs are a more accurate predictor of performance than actual ability when it comes to the Irish language.“There appears to be a much larger number of civil servants, and generally the wider population, that are completely misrepresenting their Irish knowledge by declaring themselves as non-speakers of Irish. This results in a general withdrawal from using the language with a belief that the Irish language is ‘gone forever’ or ‘forgotten’.“This research is unique in that it is the first study to investigate Irish language self-efficacy beliefs, or perceptions, in current civil servants. What is striking is how those that have studied Irish in school, even to a high standard, are so quick to declare themselves as non-speakers, despite contrary evidence.“The findings in this research suggest that the Irish population possesses a knowledge of Irish language that is often unacknowledged or dismissed due to negative experiences from our school days.“What may be needed, not just for the population in general, but for the civil service in performing its obligations under the Official Languages Act, is a form of refresher training to unlock this knowledge and build people’s self-efficacy beliefs in their Irish language abilities.“By doing this, we may finally change our emotive relationship with the Irish language to a more positive one, where hearing our native language on the street or in shops could become less of a surprise to us.”Shane Barry is a departmental assistant and current PhD student in Applied Linguistics in the Department of English Language and Literature at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick. The full paper, ‘Irish language self-efficacy beliefs and the Official Languages Act 2003’, appears in the 2020 edition of Teanga, and is free to access at https://journal.iraal.ie/index.php/teanga/article/view/213 Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Print Emailcenter_img Linkedin LimerickNewsIs fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla clisteBy Meghann Scully – February 3, 2021 451 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Facebook WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

Uncommon coinage

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first_imgAmong the Harvard Art Museums’ vast treasures is a miniature work that marked a murderous coup.Minted in the Roman Republic in 43‒42 BCE, the small silver coin features the head of Marcus Junius Brutus on one side, and two daggers, a hat often worn by a freed slave, and the Latin words Eid Mar (“Ides of March,” in English) on the other. It was struck by Brutus, who, along with several other members of the Roman Senate, stabbed the Roman dictator Julius Caesar to death on March 15, 44 B.C. Caesar’s assassination set off a scramble for power that would ultimately spell the end of the Roman Republic and inaugurate the Roman Empire under the reign of his adopted son and heir, Octavian, known to history as the Emperor Augustus.The imagery on the piece is unmistakable and “very powerful,” said Carmen Arnold-Biucchi, who recently retired after almost two decades as the museums’ first curator of ancient coins. During her tenure, Arnold-Biucchi helped bring roughly 2,000 other pieces to Harvard, small-scale works of art adorned with mythical creatures, ancient architecture, biblical references, important people, and poignant dates. Her acquisitions are key historical artifacts that augment the museums’ collection of more than 20,000 Greek, Roman, and Byzantine coins. In some cases, in fact, they are among the few existing remnants of parts of the past.Arnold-Biucchi was teaching a seminar in Hellenistic coins several years ago when a student mentioned his interest in seeing the Greek world from another perspective. “Suddenly, I realized that we have very few ancient Jewish coins, which are extremely important,” she said, “because there are so few material documents for Jewish history left.” Arnold-Biucchi filled that gap by acquiring coins from the Hasmonaean and Herodian kings, from the first and the second Jewish revolts (under Titus and under Hadrian), and other coins connected to ancient Jewish life.The Swiss Italian native said she isn’t entirely sure what drew her to study classical archaeology, a field that includes coins, while she was a student at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. Languages or medical school didn’t appeal to her, but history, and the study of ancient, tangible objects, did. And coins, which she eventually gravitated toward, were some of the most tangible artifacts around. Denarius of L. Plaetorius Cestianus for Brutus, Moving Mint. Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of Frederick M. Watkins Related An unanticipated juxtaposition Radcliffe fellow heads a team helping preserve the ancient city of Nicomedia in modern-day Turkey center_img Uncovering an ancient world “Coins were meant to circulate and to be touched,” said Arnold-Biucchi, whose position was endowed as the Damarete Curatorship of Ancient Coins in 2009. Before arriving on campus in 2002 she spent 18 years at the American Numismatic Society in New York City. At Harvard she has organized, cataloged, and digitized the collection and promoted coins as important windows to history, teaching in the Department of the Classics and at the Harvard Extension School, and always engaging students directly with the collection. “They are among the few types of objects in the museum that people can touch,” said Arnold-Biucchi, “and that is very powerful. So when I teach, I always teach with the coins.”Also powerful is the fact that coins can shine a very distinct light on history. Created by the state, ancient coins often carry important information about a society’s economy, political history, trading patterns, culture, religion, and rulers through their images, materials, and the technologies used to create them. And because they were created in bulk — one pair of dies, notes Arnold-Biucchi, could strike 20,000 coins — and made from durable materials, they survive in large numbers. They also often contain information that ties them to a specific period or even an exact date, said Arnold-Biucchi,who calls them “original works of ancient sculpture in miniature.” Among her favorites at the museums is the dekadrachm of Akragas from the end of the fifth century B.C. Only 10 are known to exist, and Harvard’s is the only one in the U.S. Roughly the size of a silver dollar, it is one of the largest denominations of ancient coinage (originally worth 10 drachmas, the standard unit of Greek coinage) and its detailed engraving renders it an artistic tour de force. On one side two eagles peck at a hare (the eagle is a mark of Zeus), on the other a naked youth drives a four-horse chariot.,“Most of the coins of Sicily have a four-horse chariot with a victory on top,” said Arnold-Biucchi who noted the dekadrachm would most likely have been used to pay high-ranking military men. But the coin’s imagery didn’t honor a political victory, she added. “The Sicilian tyrants of the fifth century B.C. were very wealthy, so they would send their chariots to compete at the games of Olympia.”Arnold-Biucchi said she leaves Harvard inspired by her years at the museums, by her colleagues, and by a message from the University’s recent commencement speaker, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who encouraged her listeners to embrace change. Near the end of her address in May Merkel told the crowd gathered in Tercentenary Theatre: “I believe that time and time again we need to be prepared to keep bringing things to an end in order to feel the magic of new beginnings.”“I will do that too,” said Arnold-Biucchi.The Harvard Art Museums has more than 150 coins on display in the ancient art galleries on the third floor. Online visitors can explore the coin collection via the museums’ website. Harvard Art Museum curators challenge expectations with new art pairinglast_img read more

Pipe bursts in Duncan Student Center, forcing evacuation

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first_imgPhoto courtesy of James Martinson The Duncan Student Center is flooded after a sprinkler main burst on the third floor.“Due to the cold conditions, a sprinkler main broke on the third floor, causing damage there and on floors one and two,” University spokesman Dennis Brown said in an email.According to an email sent out by the University, the center will remain closed for the rest of the day but will tentatively reopen Friday at 7:30 a.m. Restaurants will be open normal hours and the Smith Center for Recreational Sports will open at noon, the email said.Tags: duncan student center, Polar Vortex, RecSports Almost two hours after campus reopened on Thursday, a pipe burst in the Duncan Student Center at approximately 2:50 p.m., forcing all inside to evacuate.last_img

Grimes boys soccer stops MPH; ESM, J-D to meet in sectionals

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first_img Tags: Bishop Grimesboys soccerCBAESMJ-DMPH Mugushu scored a second time in the 18th minute, and the Cobras led 2-1 at halftime, helped in no small part by Matt Tarby’s diving save on Jack Hogan’s point-blank shot late in the half.Not until midway through the second half did Grimes get away, Deng Mawien ripping in a point-blank shot and, seconds after another fine stop from Tarby, Mugushu breaking away to earn his third goal of the day.This followed a 2-0 win over Nottingham on Oct. 12 where Grimes again turned to Mugushu, who tamed the Bulldogs by earning both of the Cobras’ goals. And the win over MPH was followed, on Friday, by Grimes taking on Chittenango and, once again, the duo of Mugushu and Mawien impossible to contain in a 6-4 Cobras victory over the Bears.Improving to 13-3 overall, Grimes fought its way to a 4-2 halftime lead and matched Chittenango’s production the rest of the way, Mugushu tacking on four more goals to his total and Mawien earning the other two, each adding an assist.Meanwhile, on a soggy Thursday afternoon MPH lost again, Bishop Ludden topping the Trojans 3-0. A goal in the first half and two more in the second half proved enough as Liam Casey, Noah Kerwin and Michael Gaughan scored for the Gaelic Knights.Christian Brothers Academy and East Syracuse Minoa both won last Tuesday with shutouts as the Brothers blanked Skaneateles 1-0 and the Spartans handled Cortland 5-0.It proved a tough game between CBA and Skaneateles, with lots of chances on both ends, but only Jack Harrigan scoring in the second half off a feed from Andrew Kohlbrenner. None of the Lakers’ 12 shots got past Rocco DeLorenzo.Following this up on a chilly, wet Thursday night, the Brothers blanked Homer 4-0, with goals from Srvavan Kodaali, Isaiah Lerch and John Vassenelli that helped showcase the Brothers’ growing depth. That improved CBA’s overall record to 9-6-1.As for ESM, it saw its top scorer, Sean Belcher, put away Cortland with a three-goal hat trick. Other goals went to Christian Moon and Lance Madonna as Matt Kenney picked up a pair of assists.ESM closed its regular season 10-4-2 at the tail end of an up-and-down stretch. The Spartans had lost 3-1 to Central Square on Oct. 8, but rebounded to top Oswego 4-1 a day later before a 6-1 defeat to Pittsford Sutherland.Jamesville-DeWitt finished its regular season Saturday, against Cortland, and it ended in a 2-2 draw.Then the sectional Class A playoff pairings were released, and J-D found itself, as the no. 6 seed, slotted into a quarterfinal Thursday night against no. 3 seed ESM, the two side having split their regular-season encounters.Meanwhile, CBA got the no. 9 seed and would need to beat no. 8 seed New Hartford for a quarterfinal berth against top seed PSLA-Fowler.In Class C, Grimes earned the no. 2 seed and would host no. 15 seed Otselic Valley, with the winner getting Thousand Islands or Herkimer. MPH, the no. 4 seed in Class D, would host no. 13 seed Hamilton, the winner to take on Cincinnatus or Stockbridge Valley. Here, in front of the Bishop Grimes boys soccer team, is a glorious opportunity to shrug off past disappointments and make a serious push for the Section III Class C championship.The state Class C no. 6-ranked Cobras made another big statement last Tuesday by going to state Class D no. 13-ranked Manlius-Pebble Hill and, with Byam Mugushu’s hat trick, defeating the Trojans 4-1.Grimes handled MPH 6-2 earlier this season, and got the lead here barely four minutes into the game when Mugushu converted, only to have the Trojans counter with Simon Hoke’s strong move to the net and goal. Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story last_img read more

Popular Somalia Referee Osman Jama Dirah Shot Dead In Mogadishu

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first_imgRelatedOriol RieraJune 30, 2017Similar postGranada CF vs Sporting GijonJune 30, 2017Similar postGhanaian Referee Reginald Lathbridge Banned For LifeMarch 20, 2018In “Africa” Popular Somali referee, Osman Jama Dirah has been shot dead on Thursday evening near his home in the Somali capital, Mogadishu.Osman Jama Dirah, who started his refereeing career in the 90’s, has officiated regional and international football matches and was formerly the head of Somali Football Federation referee committee.Anas Ali Mohamud, a former Somali National Team player, and friend of the deceased told reporters after the incident: “The sports officer was killed after leaving mosque on the way to his residence in Wardhigley district. Two men armed with pistols shot him several times,”“Somali sports figures and members of the Somali Football Federation have never been a target for the armed groups because they did not get involved into politics, they were entertainers. But the killing of this official has created a fear and uncertainty among us”However, the motives behind Dirah’s death are yet to be ascertained as no armed ghas have claimed responsibility for the killing.last_img read more