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Newspaper censored by the government

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first_img March 13, 2020 Find out more July 8, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper censored by the government Follow the news on Mauritania Publication of the latest issue of the weekly newspaper La Tribune has been banned, apparently because it contained criticism of recent government efforts to interfere with the election of the president of the national bar association.”This shows that despite the government saying it favours a “free, strong and professional” press, it continues to use the notorious Article 11 of the press law to punish newspapers that mention what it sees as taboo subjects,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard in a letter to interior minister Lemrabott Sidi Mahmoud Ould Cheikh Ahmed. At least five newspapers have been censored by the ministry since June last year. The interior ministry refused permission for the 2 July issue of French-language weekly newspaper La Tribune (no.165) to be printed, under Article 11 of the press law. The decision appears to have been prompted by an article in that issue headed “Bar Association election” that criticised the government’s failed attempt to prevent the re-election of Mahfoudh Ould Bettah as the Association’s president at a meeting on 27 June.The managing editor of La Tribune, Mohamed Fall Ould Oumere, was arrested on 12 April for investigating the activities of a non-officially recognised organisation called “Conscience et résistance.”. He was freed on 21 April. Help by sharing this information News News News Organisation MauritaniaAfrica to go furthercenter_img Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world News Mauritanian reporter held for two days over Facebook post MauritaniaAfrica May 20, 2021 Find out more July 6, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts RSF_en RSF backs joint op-ed by 120 West African media and journalists calling for Beninese journalist’s releaselast_img read more

Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste

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first_imgAdvertisement IRISH people are in danger of underestimating their own ability to speak their native language, according to research carried about by a Mary Immaculate College (MIC) researcher. Previous articleMunster’s Gavin Coombes Called Into Ireland CampNext articleCall for innovative ideas to make Limerick city ‘energy positive’ Meghann Scully TAGSGaeilgeIrishKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostMary Immaculate College Indeed, the same study suggests that lack of confidence in the cúpla focal could be linked to an absence of quality feedback in school.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Shane Barry, an Applied Linguistics doctoral student at MIC has drawn the conclusion based on his interviews with current civil servants who were asked to rate their own Irish language proficiency.In his study, he asked participants to evaluate their own ability to speak Irish in a current conversational setting. The research found that 60% of respondents would generally downplay their own abilities but would answer more favourably to specific questions, such as their ability to order a cup of coffee in a Gaeltacht area.Barry suggests that those who claim to have low Irish self-efficacy have generally experienced a ‘lethal combination’ of experiencing poor performances and a lack of feedback during school.Barry explains that the Official Languages Act of 2003, which requires public bodies within the Irish state to provide services through both Irish and English, served as the inspiration behind the study.“A recent official report where sixteen Government departments were surveyed, of which there are over 21,000 employees, revealed that only 2.62% of staff are recognised as having a competence in the Irish language – or in other words, capable of interacting with the public through Irish when required.“The most important implication emerging from my research is that these misaligned self-efficacy beliefs are a more accurate predictor of performance than actual ability when it comes to the Irish language.“There appears to be a much larger number of civil servants, and generally the wider population, that are completely misrepresenting their Irish knowledge by declaring themselves as non-speakers of Irish. This results in a general withdrawal from using the language with a belief that the Irish language is ‘gone forever’ or ‘forgotten’.“This research is unique in that it is the first study to investigate Irish language self-efficacy beliefs, or perceptions, in current civil servants. What is striking is how those that have studied Irish in school, even to a high standard, are so quick to declare themselves as non-speakers, despite contrary evidence.“The findings in this research suggest that the Irish population possesses a knowledge of Irish language that is often unacknowledged or dismissed due to negative experiences from our school days.“What may be needed, not just for the population in general, but for the civil service in performing its obligations under the Official Languages Act, is a form of refresher training to unlock this knowledge and build people’s self-efficacy beliefs in their Irish language abilities.“By doing this, we may finally change our emotive relationship with the Irish language to a more positive one, where hearing our native language on the street or in shops could become less of a surprise to us.”Shane Barry is a departmental assistant and current PhD student in Applied Linguistics in the Department of English Language and Literature at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick. The full paper, ‘Irish language self-efficacy beliefs and the Official Languages Act 2003’, appears in the 2020 edition of Teanga, and is free to access at https://journal.iraal.ie/index.php/teanga/article/view/213 Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Print Emailcenter_img Linkedin LimerickNewsIs fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla clisteBy Meghann Scully – February 3, 2021 451 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Facebook WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

Her wheels are always turning

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first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.For busy bicyclist and blogger Alice Anne Brown, MUP ’13, the wheels are always turning. They turn in her mind at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (GSD), where for two years she has studied urban planning — especially how bicycles can make cities more livable, lovable, and viable.And the wheels turn for Brown on the road, where she logs five to 20 miles a day on her one-speed Westport cruiser. It has fat wheels, pedal brakes, a single gear, and a seat that makes her sit up straight, all the better to just look around. (For weekend distance rides, she keeps a Specialized Dolce.) “I’m a three-city girl,” said Brown, whose home is in Somerville, school is in Cambridge, and work is in Boston (as a project manager at Boston Bikes, a citywide cycling initiative).She was born in Detroit, the Motor City, but her core passion revolves around how pedal power could be at the heart of a safe, practical, and low-impact urban life. Brown has ridden the bike lanes in many of the 22 countries she’s visited, though two years ago she was obliged to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on foot.“There is no better way to really see a place,” she said of biking. Her childhood seemed to be on wheels too, and rolled through Michigan to Maryland and back to Ohio for her father’s engineering career. Mostly, she grew up in the village of Baltimore, Ohio, where home was on five acres with a pond. She swam, ice skated, played the flute, and dabbled in 4H. (“I was a disaster at cooking and sewing,” she said.) Her younger brother took to country life, but “I have searched for cities ever since,” said Brown.At Ohio State University, Brown studied physics, then switched to mathematics. (She also rowed crew and played ice hockey.) As an undergraduate senator, Brown sat on a town-gown planning board that piqued her interest in how cities worked, including streetlight audits and regulations for commercial frontage. In 2003, armed with dual degrees in math and philosophy, Brown moved to the Bronx, where for five years she taught math to sixth- and eighth-graders.Even when teaching, Brown felt intimations of the career she ultimately would embrace: planning that would make the world’s cities greener. She spent many hours in New York’s Central Park, a place that she said feels like her real home. In a life-changing experience, Brown led her class through a unit on sustainability, including a look at the “No Impact Man” lifestyle. For a week, she rode her bike everywhere.When she moved to Ethiopia in 2008 for a three-year teaching job in Addis Ababa, her bike came with her, as did her interest in public spaces. Brown surveyed city parks in the capital. She also studied the ubiquitous and cheap 14-passenger minivans that provide informal public transport in much of East Africa. She realized that her interests had converged into a desire to study urban planning.“I wanted to change things,” said Brown, who applied to the GSD, was admitted, and started in September 2011.What’s next? “I could go anywhere,” said Brown. She has new skills at planning and assessment and a vision of cities where streets are designed for more than cars. Still, she added, “I don’t want to be just the bike girl.”last_img read more

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary Ascent of the Nose

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first_imgIn this month’s issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors, guidebook author and North Carolina climbing advocate Mike Reardon relays the December 1966 first ascent of the Nose at Looking Glass, a benchmark achievement in the history of North Carolina climbing. First ascentionists Steve Longenecker, Robert John Gillespie, and Bob Watts met last month for the first time in over a decade to revisit Looking Glass and their landmark ascent. Both humble and charming, the three talked to Blue Ridge Outdoors on camera about their climb, their relationship, and the present-day climbing community in North Carolina._mg_9393Join us this Saturday, December 10th from 6—8pm, at Black Dome Mountain Sports for the showing of these interviews. Steve, Robert John, and Bob will all be present and available for a Q&A session. Beer proceeds from Oskar Blues and Wicked Weed, as well as sales from Mike Fischesser’s long-awaited book, “Forbidden Fruit – The History and Exploration of Laurel Knob,” will benefit the Carolina Climbers Coalition. The event also marks the opening of North Carolina’s very own climbing history museum. Attendees are asked to bring gear, topos, or images of climbing relevance from decades past to contribute to the museum.Stay up-to-date on the event at the Facebook page here. Help us celebrate these living legends and support climbing initiatives in North Carolina for decades to come.Have questions? Email [email protected] with any inquiries.last_img read more

NFL draft to go ahead as planned but players, fans will not be a part of it due to COVID

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first_imgLas Vegas: The 2020 American football NFL draft will go ahead as planned next month but players, fans and media will not be part of it due to the coronavirus pandemic.The draft will be held from April 23-25 in a television studio, with players interviewed via video conference, a BBC Sport report said. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said it “can serve a very positive purpose for our clubs, our fans and the country”. He added: “There is no assurance that we can select a different date and be confident that conditions will be significantly more favourable than they are today.”The NFL draft is one of the most sought after events in the US’ sporting calendar. A total of 32 teams recruit talent from the American collegiate system in front of packed media. IANSAlso Read: Satisfying to beat a quality side like India: Kane WilliamsonAlso Watch: East Siang District Administration in Arunachal Pradesh cautious over corona viruslast_img read more

Appeal hearing reportedly set after Vontaze Burfict gets season-long suspension

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first_imgBurfict’s agent appealed the decision, and NFL Media reported a hearing has been scheduled for Oct. 8. The NFL is done with Vontaze Burfict playing outside the rules. The league announced Monday it has suspended the Raiders linebacker for the rest of the 2019 season for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Colts tight end Jack Doyle during Sunday’s game. Rams’ loss to Buccaneers ‘a wake-up call for everybody,’ Sean McVay says Jalen Ramsey trade rumors: Jaguars turned down two first-round picks for star cornerbackcenter_img Source: The appeal for #Raiders LB Vontaze Burfict of his suspension for the rest of the season will be on Tuesday, heard by NFL-NFLPA jointly appointed appeals officer, Hall of Famer Derrick Brooks.— Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) October 3, 2019Derrick Brooks will hear Burfict’s appeal, and NFL Media notes he and James Thrash have a history in that chair — Thrash previously reduced a Burfict suspension from five games to three in 2017 after Brooks upheld a three-game suspension in 2016. Like this tweet if you think Vontaze Burfict should receive a lifetime ban from the NFL pic.twitter.com/I0ZwC4m0BE— Kyle Fahey (@KyleFaheyNFL) September 29, 2019If the season-long ban is upheld, Burfict will have been suspended for a total of 22 games in his career. Those absences and additional fines incurred will have cost him more than $5 million in salary, according to ESPN.The Raiders (2-2) are next slated to take on the Bears (3-1) in London in Week 5. Burfict, 29, has a long history of illegal hits that have led to fines and suspensions. He reportedly racked up $165,000 in sanctions last season alone. Vontaze Burfict suspended for remainder of 2019 season for violations of unnecessary roughness rules. pic.twitter.com/oSMl2iSRNW— Michael Signora (@NFLfootballinfo) September 30, 2019″There were no mitigating circumstances on this play,” NFL vice president of football operations Jon Runyan wrote in a letter to Burfict. “Your contact was unnecessary, flagrant and should have been avoided. … Following each of your previous rule violations, you were warned by me and each of the jointly appointed appeal officers that future violations would result in escalated accountability measures. However, you have continued to flagrantly abuse rules designed to protect yourself and opponents from unnecessary risk.”  Related Newslast_img read more

Avoid Wet Paint Lines on Tumwater Streets This Friday

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first_imgFacebook1Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The City of TumwaterOn Friday, September 12, 2014, road crews will be painting new center lines, edge lines and bike lanes on streets throughout the City of Tumwater. Work will begin at 10:00 a.m. and continue to approximately 5:30 p.m. Some traffic delays are expected. Please do not pass painting equipment or travel over freshly painted lines.Please avoid driving over wet paint.  The paint striping vehicle will be equipped with flashing lights, followed by at least two other vehicles with advisory signs. To avoid getting paint on your vehicle, do not pass the paint striping equipment and do not drive across painted lines if you see striping activity in the area. If you get paint on your vehicle, wash it off immediately.This work will be completed by the City of Tumwater Public Works Department with assistance from the Lewis County Public Works road crew. The application of striping and pavement markings requires dry weather conditions.  If inclement weather prohibits work, the schedule will be extended to the following weekend.Contact the City of Tumwater Public Works Operations and Maintenance Division at (360) 754-4150 for more information.last_img read more