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Open verdict in inquest of missing Limerick man

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first_imgWATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Previous articleSwimming – Limerick’s Doyle wins Athlete of the yearNext articleTwo Limerick sisters brawled outside family home Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSClarelimerickmissingRoss Minihane RIP NewsOpen verdict in inquest of missing Limerick manBy Staff Reporter – May 31, 2016 1142 Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Email WhatsApp Linkedin Print The late Ross Minihane from LimerickAN inquest into the death of a Limerick man who had been missing from his home for more than three months has returned an open verdict after the Clare Coroner found that it could not be determined what happened in the lead-up to the discovery of his body.Ross Minihane (37) was reported missing from his home on December 17 last year.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up On March 29, his body was found on the banks of the River Shannon at Labasheeda by the crew of the Shannon rescue helicopter.Originally from Rathbane, he had been living in Sixmilebridge for a short period before he went missing.His remains were found when the Shannon coastguard helicopter was on a training exercise near the shore at Colmanstown. Gardaí and the RNLI assisted in the subsequent recovery of the remains.Recognising the clothing that Mr Minihane was wearing from a missing person appeal posted on social media,Garda John Cahill told the Coroner’s Court that he linked the remains to Ross Minihane from a description of his clothing posted in a missing person appeal on social media.DNA profiling confirmed the identity of the remains as being those of the 37-year-old Limerick man.A post-mortem examination was carried out at University Hospital Limerick but it was unable to confirm the cause of death.Clare County Coroner, Isobel O’Dea said that as it was not known what happened to Mr Minihane in the lead up to his death, an open verdict would be recorded by the court.Sympathies were expressed to the family and all those involved in the recovery of Mr Minihane’s remains were thanked as well as Garda Cahill, the Shannon Coastguard and Gardaí at Kildysart.center_img Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Facebook Advertisement Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

This Event is Sure to Make a Big Splash

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first_imgJohn Walton, center, holding the American flag, leads the celebration during the 2017 Business Persons Plunge. By Donald WittkowskiAs usual, he will wear his tailor-made black suit, a tie and dress shoes. He will also be carrying his trademark leather briefcase.Ocean City real estate broker John Walton will look very much the part of a serious businessman who is ready to close a big deal on Friday, May 24.But don’t expect to see him huddled in his office on that day. Instead, he will be out on the beach. The nattily attired Walton will march straight into the ocean during a wacky local tradition known as the Business Persons Plunge.Each year, Walton leads the high-stepping, well-dressed masses from the local business community into the surf amid the strains of “Pomp and Circumstance” played by the Ocean City High School Marching Band.Now in its 16th year, the Business Persons Plunge is a widely anticipated spectacle that serves to officially “open” the ocean during Memorial Day weekend for the summer tourism season.“There is beautiful city support for this event,” Walton said.The festivities will also include Mayor Jay Gillian, members of City Council and other dignitaries using a large wooden key to “unlock” the beaches for the all-important vacation season.The May 24 plunge is scheduled to begin at 11:30 a.m. on the beach next to the Ocean City Music Pier at Moorlyn Terrace and the Boardwalk. It will be held rain or shine.The Business Persons Plunge serves as an unorthodox good luck charm to usher in a strong tourism season for the business community. By Memorial Day, the Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce is usually able to predict whether the summer season will be robust based on early beach tag sales as well as bookings for hotels, motels and rental properties.During remarks to City Council, John Walton shows off the old briefcase he carries with him into the surf during the plunge.As is his custom, Walton appears before City Council to tease the event with a salesman-like flair, promising that “thousands and thousands” of spectators and “dozens of paparazzi” will be on hand to witness the zany celebration.“Help us unlock the ocean for the summer and don’t miss out on the fun,” he told the Council members at their May 9 meeting.Walton toted a weather-beaten black briefcase into the Council Chambers. It is the same briefcase that he carries with him into the ocean, year after year, for the plunge. He noted that it still has beach sand on it from last year.“It’s rusted shut. I can’t open it. I don’t even know what’s in it,” Walton said of the old briefcase in an interview.The briefcase complements the same black suit Walton wears each year to march blithely into the ocean. The Italian-brand Trussini suit cost about $1,500 when Walton bought in 1996 at the upscale Boyd’s clothing shop in Philadelphia.Walton once wore other suits for the plunge, but they didn’t survive the soaking in the ocean. The Trussini, however, has held up remarkably well in the past eight years.“At the end of the event, I rinse it down and then hang it out on the clothes line. Then I take it to the drycleaners,” Walton explained of the suit’s post-plunge care.The 62-year-old Walton won’t be the only plunger dressed in business attire. Some of them will be business students from Ocean City High School. Walton estimates that more than 200 business owners or their representatives will join him this year, a significant increase over the usual crowd of about 125 to 150.Attired in business wear, the plunge participants march into the waves to officially “open” the ocean for the summer tourism season.Walton believes that local business owners are even more enthusiastic about the plunge this year because they understand they can use the event to promote themselves to a wider audience.“It’s part of the pitch to get them to participate,” he said. “I’ve had a few merchants who have received front-page print coverage, television interviews, social media exposure and have been on the radio.”He said some businesses have experienced a 5 percent to 7 percent increase in sales after being featured in the news media’s coverage of the plunge.Walton encourages merchants to carry signs, their corporate logos or use props to promote their business. A retinue of beauty pageant queens and colorful, cartoonish mascots from the local business community will be on hand to serve as cheerleaders.When the Business Persons Plunge was first conceived, it was one of the events in 2004 to celebrate the 125th anniversary of Ocean City’s founding. Walton recalled the very first plunge attracted a mere 12 participants and about 20 spectators.However, Walton and Mark Soifer, the city’s former public relations director, realized the potential of the event and stuck with it. Over the years, it has dramatically grown in stature and popularity – pulling in tons of free publicity and media coverage for the city.This year, Walton hopes to ratchet up the excitement by having a plane fly over the beach, towing an advertising banner publicizing the event. He is still trying to make arrangements for the plane.“I’m trying to get a banner up there,” he said.To register for the Business Persons Plunge, go online to www.ocnj.us/bizplunge or call (609) 399-6111 for more information.last_img read more

News story: Update: AAIB investigation into the loss of aircraft N264DB

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first_imgAAIB Special Bulletin S1/2019 published: 25 February 2019The AAIB has published a Special Bulletin on the loss of Piper Malibu aircraft N264DB. The Special Bulletin includes validated factual information gathered in the early stages of our investigation. It also explains the aircraft permissions and pilot licencing requirements relevant to a US-registered aircraft carrying out a cross-border flight within Europe with a passenger on board.We have gathered evidence from radar, weather reports, video of the aircraft on the seabed and interviews with witnesses. Some operational aspects are yet to be determined, such as the validity of the pilot’s licence and ratings.Our priority now is to go through the evidence, much of which is extensive and complex, so we can piece together what happened between the aircraft being lost from radar and it coming to rest on the sea bed. This will help us understand the potential causes of the accident.We continue to speak to the families of the pilot and passenger to keep them updated on the progress of our investigation. If any urgent safety issues arise during our investigation, we will issue a further Special Bulletin. When our investigation has concluded, we will publish a final report.The AAIB has published a Special Bulletin on the loss of Piper Malibu aircraft N264DB.Update 4: 7 February 2019Following extensive visual examination of the accident site using the remotely operated vehicle (ROV), it was decided to attempt recovery operations.In challenging conditions, the AAIB and its specialist contractors successfully recovered the body previously seen amidst the wreckage. The operation was carried out in as dignified a way as possible and the families were kept informed of progress.Unfortunately, attempts to recover the aircraft wreckage were unsuccessful before poor weather conditions forced us to return the ROV to the ship. The weather forecast is poor for the foreseeable future and so the difficult decision was taken to bring the overall operation to a close. The body is currently being taken to Portland to be passed into the care of the Dorset Coroner.Although it was not possible to recover the aircraft, the extensive video record captured by the ROV is expected to provide valuable evidence for our safety investigation.We expect our next update to be an interim report, which we intend to publish within one month of the accident occurring.Update 3: 4 February 2019Having identified a priority search area last week, the AAIB agreed a search strategy with Blue Water Recoveries Ltd to maximise the chance of locating the aircraft wreckage.The AAIB commissioned specialist vessel Geo Ocean III and Blue Water Recoveries Ltd commissioned FPV Morven and the search area was divided between the vessels. Both vessels began their search on the morning of Sunday 3 February.Early in the search, the Morven identified an object of interest on the seabed using its side-scan sonar equipment. It cleared the immediate area for the Geo Ocean III to use its underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to survey the area of the seabed in which the object was located. Based on analysis of ROV video footage, the AAIB investigators on board the vessel concluded that the object is wreckage from the missing Piper Malibu aircraft, registration N264DB.The ROV carried out a further search of the area overnight, but did not identify any additional pieces of wreckage.Tragically, in video footage from the ROV, one occupant is visible amidst the wreckage. The AAIB is now considering the next steps, in consultation with the families of the pilot and passenger, and the police.The image shows the rear left side of the fuselage including part of the aircraft registration.We intend to publish an interim report within one month of the accident occurring.Update 2: Wednesday 30 January 2019Since we opened our safety investigation on Tuesday 23 January, we have been gathering evidence such as flight, aircraft and personnel records, and have been analysing radar data and air traffic tapes. We have been working closely with other international authorities and have kept the families of those involved updated on our progress.On the morning of Monday 28 January, we were advised by the Bureau d’Enquêtes & d’Analyses (BEA), the French safety investigation authority, that part of a seat cushion had been found on a beach near Surtainville on the Cotentin Peninsula. A second cushion was found in the same area later that day. From a preliminary examination we have concluded that it is likely that the cushions are from the missing aircraft.From the moment we were notified of the missing aircraft, we have been looking at the feasibility of conducting an underwater seabed search for aircraft wreckage. Based on a detailed assessment of the flight path and last known radar position, we have now identified a priority search area of approximately four square nautical miles. Through the Ministry of Defence’s Salvage and Marine Operations (SALMO) Project Team, we have commissioned a specialist survey vessel to carry out an underwater survey of the seabed to try to locate and identify possible aircraft wreckage.Due to the weather and sea conditions, we currently expect our underwater seabed search to start at the end of this weekend and to take up to three days. Side-scan sonar equipment will be used to try to locate the wreckage on the seabed. If the wreckage is found, a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) will be used to visually examine the wreckage.We are aware that a privately operated search is also being conducted in the area, and we are liaising closely with those involved to maximise the chance of locating any wreckage and ensure a safe search operation.Our remit is to undertake safety investigations to establish the cause of accidents. We do not apportion blame or liability.Update 1: Wednesday 23 January 2019On Monday night, a US-registered Piper PA-46-310P Malibu aircraft (registration N264DB) was lost from radar north of Guernsey. The aircraft was en route from Nantes, France to Cardiff, United Kingdom, with one pilot and one passenger on board.In accordance with international protocols, the AAIB is investigating the loss of the aircraft. Since Tuesday morning, we have been working closely with international authorities including the US National Transportation Safety Board, the Bureau d’Enquêtes & d’Analyses (BEA) in France and the Junta de Investigación de Accidentes de Aviación Civil (JIACC) in Argentina.We will be gathering all the available evidence to conduct a thorough investigation. However, if the aircraft is not found it is likely to limit the scope of the investigation. AAIB Special Bulletin S2/2019 published: 14 August 2019The AAIB has published a second Special Bulletin on the loss of Piper Malibu aircraft N264DB. This Special Bulletin highlights the danger of exposure to carbon monoxide in both piston and turbine engine aircraft.Toxicology tests found that the passenger had a high saturation level of COHb (the combination product of carbon monoxide and haemoglobin). It is considered likely that the pilot would also have been exposed to carbon monoxide.When our investigation has concluded, we will publish a final report.last_img read more

Novel cancer treatment gets major boost

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first_img Designed to target skin cancer, implantable vaccine opens door to treating many cancers, inflammatory diseases Cancer vaccine begins Phase I clinical trials Personal cancer vaccines show promise Tumor-specific peptides could help eradicate tumors and prevent them from recurring Cancer vaccine success Implant-based cancer vaccine is first to eliminate tumors in mice Related Unlike cell-based cancer immunotherapies that manipulate immune cells outside of the body and transferring them into patients, the implantable immuno-material approach activates endogenous immune cells inside a patient’s own body to launch an attack on his or her cancer. The novel technique was developed, incubated, and advanced at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) by David Mooney, Wyss core faculty member, leader of the Immuno-Materials initiative at the Wyss Institute, and Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.Made of the polymer that’s used in biodegradable sutures, this aspirin-sized device is designed to deliver immunotherapy agents that activate the immune system against tumors. Image courtesy of the Wyss Institute at Harvard UniversityThe Wyss Institute and SEAS announced Tuesday that Novartis will have access to commercially develop their therapeutic, biomaterial-based cancer vaccine technology that promotes cancer immunity. Under a licensing agreement spearheaded by Harvard’s Office of Technology Development (OTD), Novartis will have worldwide rights, in target-limited applications, to develop and translate this treatment approach.The first-generation therapy consists of a porous scaffold made from a widely used biodegradable medical polymer infused with inactivated antigens from the patient’s own tumor cells, as well as immunostimulatory molecules that attract dendritic cells of the immune system to the immuno-material site and activate them to stimulate a host response. Once activated, the dendritic cells move to nearby lymph nodes to orchestrate anti-tumor responses throughout the body.“This work resulted from a remarkable cross-disciplinary effort using the combined expertise of bioengineers, cancer biologists, and immunologists,” said Mooney. “We have demonstrated that these biomaterials can be easily delivered to patients, provide sustained and local release of immune-modulating factors, and bypass the need for modification of cells outside the body. This concept has led to a very promising platform for cancer immunotherapy.”,In 2013, the Wyss Institute and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) initiated a Phase I clinical trial at DFCI to test the safety of the first of these implantable, immuno-material-based vaccines in patients with melanoma, a lethal form of skin cancer. The trial, led by F. Stephen Hodi Jr., director of DFCI’s Melanoma Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, is still ongoing with many of its original patients.The trial followed extensive preclinical studies by a collaborative team headed by Mooney and Glenn Dranoff, who at the time was a Wyss Institute associate faculty member and co-leader of Dana Farber’s Cancer Vaccine Center. The team demonstrated that the vaccine could potentially shrink or eradicate multiple types of tumors, in addition to acting as a prophylactic, in various animal models. Dranoff is now global head of exploratory immuno-oncology at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research. Novartis has also established a collaboration agreement with the Wyss Institute to further develop biomaterial systems for its portfolio of second-generation immuno-oncology therapies.“When we initiated this cancer vaccine program at the Wyss Institute, it was strike zone for what we wanted to pursue — a research project conceived by our visionary faculty that was high-risk and required a highly collaborative and interdisciplinary effort but had the potential to bring about a transformative advance in clinical care,” said Wyss Institute Director Donald Ingber, the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, as well as professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.“Then, with the vision and collaborative support of another institutional member of the Wyss Institute consortium, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, we made the decision to co-fund a Phase I clinical trial inside academia, which was really pushing the envelope. Thus, this agreement is extremely exciting for us because it validates our innovation model, but even more importantly, it will bring an exciting new therapeutic modality into the clinic for patients with many different types of cancer.”In addition to Mooney, Dranoff, and Hodi, other collaborators include Wyss senior staff scientist Edward Doherty, Wyss Institute staff scientist Omar Ali, DFCI Executive Director Jerome Ritz, Dana-Farber surgeons Sara Russell and Charles Yoon, Wyss Institute scientist Alexander Stafford, and other Wyss Institute researchers and clinical research team members at Dana-Farber.The development and study of the cancer vaccine was funded by the Wyss Institute, DFCI, and the National Institutes of Health. The licensed technologies are owned or co-owned by Harvard University, DFCI, and the University of Michigan.last_img read more

Triple Threat.

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first_img “Farmers are being hit with a triple whammy of dry weather, low crop prices and extremely high fuel costs,” said Bill Thomas, a University of Georgia Extension Service economist. “The drier it is,” Thomas said, “the more farmers have to run the diesel engines on their irrigation systems. And they will try to pass that cost on to consumers.” As farmers make the first turn into the growing season, even after last week’s rain, the outlook isn’t good, says state climatologist David Stooksbury. “This week’s rain will be good for early growth and germination for those crops that were already in the field,” he said. “And, psychologically, it was a nice rain — the type of rain we need to have.” Most areas of the state got 1.5 to 2 inches. However, Georgia is still below normal for the year. Most places are still below normal for the month.Little Rain, Not Enough Growers bet on March, historically Georgia’s wettest month, to bring the moisture needed for the prime planting season. “For April, there is an increased probability for below-normal precipitation for the state,” Stooksbury said. “That holds true for May and June. The temperatures are also expected to be above normal.” The combination of above-normal temperatures and below-normal rain spells real trouble for farmers. “It’s already hot in Georgia, but this year it will be hotter than normal,” Stooksbury warned. “And that will increase soil-moisture loss. We have had so little rain that we don’t have a large reserve of soil moisture.” Hot and Dry Expect those high temperatures to last all summer, but in the final turn toward harvest, Georgia might see some wet weather. “There is indication that, as we go into late summer and early fall, south Georgia will have an increased probability of above-normal precipitation,” Stooksbury said. “But by then, it might be too late.” Dry weather and high fuel prices cost farmers more to run tractors, planters and irrigators. And transportation costs will add even more to food prices. But the main impact on food prices is the weather, according to a report from the U.S. Economic Research Service’s 2000 Agricultural Outlook Forum last month.Prices Rise Forecasts of more dry weather are just the beginning of Georgia farmers’ problems. And the triple threat facing them could drive up grocery prices. The report predicted that the prices of fresh fruits and vegetables will rise 2 percent to 3 percent this year. The same is true for most processed fruits and vegetables. “If fresh sweet corn goes up, the price has to be passed on to consumers,” Thomas said, “because there’s no alternative we can import. If the prices of other crops like grains go up, we will ship supplies in from other countries.” How much of a crop U.S. farmers put in the ground will affect the price of the product they harvest. “A lot of crops are up and down nationwide, as far as planting acres this year,” Thomas said. Acreage increases in snap beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, sweet corn and spinach should more than offset declines in celery, eggplant and tomatoes. Spinach, cauliflower and sweet corn had the largest acreage increases, while eggplant and tomatoes showed the largest decreases. Broccoli, lettuce and bell peppers remain steady. Market prices can fluctuate even more in the harvest home stretch, depending on how high fuel prices climb and how low moisture levels drop. Photo: Peggy Greb, USDA-ARS Photo: S. Bauer, USDA-ARSlast_img read more

Briefs

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first_imgBriefs Florida A&M University will host one of the 17 regional tournaments leading up to the American Intercollegiate Mock Trial Association’s national competition and the school is seeking volunteers to help officiate the tournament.Twenty-six teams from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and Tennessee will compete in the FAMU- hosted regional February 27-29 in Tallahassee. Nearly 160 judges will be needed to preside over and score the tournament.The tournament’s four rounds are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. February 27. Should you decide to participate, you will be given a brief orientation to the case and the rules of competition before each trial. Each trial lasts approximately three hours.This year the students will argue a criminal case: Tony Sturmanis was a rising star in the world of professional hockey. Tragically, he was killed during a playoff game in Midlands City following a fight with Michael Harmon. Harmon was later indicted on homicide charges. His wife, Victoria, had recently been romantically linked to Sturmanis. Also, Harmon lost a lucrative contract to Sturmanis just hours before the confrontation during the game.Those interested in volunteering may contact Tyra Mason at (850) 599-3664 or via e-mail at [email protected] CLE credit is available for participation in the tournament.Kitchen to lead Second Circuit’s new Professionalism Committee Chief Judge Charles A. Francis has reappointed the Second Judicial Circuit Committee on Professionalism. The committee ­— a Florida Supreme Court mandate for each judicial circuit — is headed by Chair E.C. Deeno Kitchen, and seeks to assess the status and conditions of professionalism within the Second Circuit.To promote professionalism and ethics with the establishment of such a committee, members agree, accomplishes several goals.“It heightens everyone’s awareness; it helps to raise the bar for professional behavior; and it provides a mechanism for identifying problems early,” said Mike Glazer, a member of the committee, who also represents the Second Circuit on the Bar’s Board of Governors.Glazer said one of the primary goals of the committee is to be able to recognize situations where an attorney’s conduct is not up to the level the Bar expects, and encourage change before things get out of control.Without an immediate idea of all of the issues to be addressed, Kitchen said the committee plans to survey the lawyers in the circuit to assess their concerns.“Essentially, we want to know, what can be better and what can we do to make it better?,” Kitchen said.Working with the circuit’s previously appointed Bench/Bar Liaison Circuit Committee, Kitchen hopes the two panels will be able to coordinate efforts to better identify issues to be addressed.Glazer said that with the number of government and private sector attorneys in the circuit, the committee should be meaningful to all lawyers.The three principles that encompass what the committee aims for are “professionalism, ethics, and civility,” said Kitchen, who takes pride in the committee’s efforts to make a difference.“That’s what we’re all about — helping in any way we can.”Court interpreter training set for Panama City Imagine facing a judge in a foreign country where you cannot speak the language. The judge will decide your fate, but you cannot understand her and she cannot understand you. That is a daily reality for thousands of immigrants living in Florida.To lessen this problem, the state court system has begun a series of programs to recruit and train foreign language interpreters. The next program will be held January 23-25 in Panama City. The registration deadline is December 12. Those who successfully complete the program will be listed on the State Courts’ Registry of Tested Interpreters.During the two-and-a-half day program in Panama City, participants will receive training about how the courts operate and how interpreters must work during court sessions. This will be followed by a written exam testing participant’s English proficiency.The registration fee is $150 for Florida residents and $300 for others. For more information visit www.flcourts.org/osca/divisions/interpret/index.html.Scholarship program puts young people on fast track Assistant Editor A deposition may be in his briefcase, but racing is in his blood.To facilitate the matriculation of young drivers into a new age of racing, Bradenton lawyer Leonard “Q” McCue, along with his wife Barbara, founded the Q Motorsports Family Student Racer Scholarship Program. Designed to promote continuing education and community service activities, McCue believes the scholarship program, which is overseen by a board of directors, will better prepare the youth both on and off the track.McCue said he can remember when his passion for racing was more accessible.The auto racing industry has shifted gears from the sandy beaches of yesteryear Daytona to the two and one-half miles of pavement that it is today.“What I observed years ago,” said McCue, “(is that) there was a mentality out there that all you needed to do was get in a jalopy and race around the dirt and you could be another Dale Earnhardt.”That’s not the case today. With advancements in technology and an increased fan base, the auto racing sport has become a multi-faceted, multi-national, multi-sponsorship phenomenon, making it more difficult for those interested to get involved.“That’s the new image,” said McCue. “They (drivers) know as much about computers as they do racing.”Students in McCue’s program are judged in three categories in consideration for scholarships: grades at school, sanctioned motorsports participation, and community service/self-promotional activities. The scholarships are awarded to Florida students ages 5 to 21 for tuition, books, and dorm fees at vocational/technical schools, colleges, universities, or junior colleges. The monies are reserved in a savings account until the drug- and crime-free recipients enroll in college.Since the program’s inception in 1997, more than $60,000 has been raised. Beyond dollars, McCue sees a group of young people who have faith in themselves, something he believes is a more accurate assessment of the rewards of the program.“I think that the success can be measured by the number of young people we have in college,” said McCue, noting that the scholarships offer a necessary education to those who otherwise might not be able to afford it.Aside from balancing academics and hard work on the racetrack, students in the program mature in their everyday lives, learning sportsmanship and self-promotion, he said.The spirit of self-promotion and entrepreneurship is something McCue wants to instill with his program. Late NASCAR driver Alan Kulwicki serves as inspiration for McCue, both as a lawyer and in his personal life:“He raised his own money, ran his own team, and became a NASCAR champion,” said McCue.In addition to gains in self-confidence, the students also learn from each other, something McCue refers to as a virtual fraternity of kids. Incredibly supportive parents are another reason the attitude is so positive, he added.“They (the parents) spend a lot of time on the road with these kids,” said McCue. “The challenges they (the kids) meet on a weekend don’t compare to the challenges they encounter sitting on their living room couches and playing a video game.”The McCues consider Casey Johnson a prime example of the goals of the program. Raised by his grandfather, Johnson didn’t know how he would ever be able to afford college.An 18-year-old honor student who has dedicated numerous hours to his community, Johnson understands the importance of securing his education, in addition to becoming a professional race car driver.Now attending the University of North Carolina with engineering aspirations, Johnson has maintained his interest in racing, having established contacts with Hendrick Motorsports, Jeff Gordon’s race team.“We are hoping that we have another Jeff Gordon here,” said McCue. For more information, call 1-800-332-1992, or write Q Motorsports Family Scholarship Program, 524 9th St. W., Bradenton 34205.Lawyer works to help Jews in Argentina FAMU seeks volunteers for mock trial competition November 15, 2003 Daniel Staesser Assistant Editor Regular News Argentina may be thousands of miles away on a map, but for Miami attorney Richard Bernstein his heritage has never been closer to his heart.Co-chair of the United Jewish Communities National Argentinean Response Task Force, Bernstein was asked to chair the task force in December 2001. Designed to provide money, food, shelter, and education to the ailing population of Jews in Argentina, the task force has raised $89 million toward their rescue and relief since January 2002.Bernstein took on the challenge during the aftermath of the country’s economic collapse in late 2001. The governmental breakdown left Argentina in poverty and its education system in disarray. The Jewish segment of this population nears 200,000, the fourth largest Jewish community in the world.When you don’t have the time to help, “you make the time; there’s no better answer than that,” Bernstein said.Bernstein said because of the task force fund-raising efforts — which include the efforts of South Florida leaders such as Michael Adler, Norman Braman, Ezra Katz, and Aaron Podhurst — the community today has food, shelter, and medicine, as well as a more functional educational system and a decent standard of living.“It appears as though things have stopped getting worse,” said Bernstein, who noted that welfare had been on a steady ascent, and tuition rose so high nobody could afford an education. The task force provided scholarships, job training, and emergency welfare for those who needed it. Since the relief, the economy has maintained an even keel, and welfare has declined.“People are cautiously optimistic,” said Bernstein, who also said that the task force provides the option for Jews to leave the country if they desire.Providing finances for those who wish to relocate to Miami, or even Israel, the task force does everything it can to provide for the Jewish people an exodus from their oppression, he said. For more information, contact the Greater Miami Jewish Federation at (305) 576-4000.last_img read more

Great Portland Estates NAV drop

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Russia discharges second Chinese man to recover from coronavirus

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first_imgRussia discharged a Chinese national from hospital in the Siberian city of Chita on Wednesday after he recovered from a coronavirus infection, local authorities said.He was the second of Russia’s two confirmed cases of coronavirus to recover. The other victim, also a Chinese national, was said by authorities on Tuesday to have recovered and been released from quarantine in Siberia’s Tyumen region.Russia has isolated hundreds of Russian and Chinese nationals for virus screening upon arrival from China. Russian authorities also quarantined a Chinese diplomat this week as a precaution. Topics :last_img

Calum Chambers hails Arsenal team-mates and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang after comeback vs Aston Villa

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first_imgCalum Chambers hails Arsenal team-mates and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang after comeback vs Aston Villa Aubameyang scored Arsenal’s winner (Picture: Getty)Calum Chambers hailed Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang after he and the Arsenal striker inspired a remarkable comeback against Aston Villa.Down to ten men, Arsenal staged a fightback from 2-1 down in the final ten minutes to snatch all three points for the Gunners.Chambers kicked things off in the 81st minute, before Aubameyang popped up three minutes later to score a thrilling winner.Aubameyang has scored 16 goals in his last 16 appearances and Chambers was full of praise for his striker.ADVERTISEMENT Comment Coral BarrySunday 22 Sep 2019 6:54 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.7kShares Advertisement Chambers kicked off Arsenal’s late fightback (Picture: Getty)‘He is a quality striker,’ he said. ‘A lot of the players in this team have quality but to have him scoring goals is great for us.’AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I am very pleased,’ he continued. ‘I hold my hand up to their second goal so I had to put things right.‘We stuck in there and worked hard and deserved it in the end. Advertisement Wesley restored Villa’s lead (Picture: Getty)‘The win is massive for us as a club and team, We have the quality and the spirit.‘We dug in deep to get the momentum going.’Arsenal had a mountain to climb in the final half hour at the Emirates when Wesley put Villa back in front – just 89 seconds after Nicolas Pepe had equalised from the spot for Arsenal. Aubameyang completed the comeback (Picture: Getty)The Gunners played the entire second half with ten men after Ainsley Maitland-Niles received a yellow for his second bookable offence in the 41st minute.MORE: Liverpool make history after beating Chelsea to maintain perfect Premier League startMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man Citylast_img read more