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Newspaper editor jailed for six months

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first_img The conviction of Niger newspaper editor Moussa Aksar is an attack on investigative journalism News NigerAfrica Organisation News The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Follow the news on Niger May 11, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders today deplored the jailing for six months on 7 November of Mamane Abou, editor of the independent weekly paper Le Républicain, for supposedly libelling the country’s finance minister.”This conviction makes no sense, as he was simply doing his job,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard. “Nothing justifies such a heavy sentence either. Legal procedures were also not properly followed because he was tried in his absence while he was in Niamey prison.””His lawyers were not even told of the trial, which is evidently a political matter. The authorities sentenced him quietly without telling anyone. Niger claims to be a democracy that respects the rule of law but this is a very alarming violation of freedom of expression,” Ménard said, calling for the journalist’s release.Abou was also fined 300,000 CFA francs (450 euros) and ordered to pay 10 million CFA francs (€15,200) in libel damages. One of his lawyers, Oumarou Soulé, told Reporters Without Borders he was shocked by the failure to follow legal procedure and said he would immediately appeal again the sentence.Abou has been held in Niamey prison since 5 November accused of publishing confidential finance ministry documents showing that the finance minister had embezzled several billion CFA francs (more than €1.5 million). Niger: Two journalists arrested in disturbing setback for press freedom News Reports Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information RSF_en to go further NigerAfrica November 27, 2020 Find out more November 12, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper editor jailed for six months Mamane Abou, editor of the weekly paper Le Républicain, was sentenced to six months in prison in Niamey on 7 November for supposed libel. Reporters Without Borders condemned the arbitrary conviction and called for his release. July 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Call for free sanitary products in Council buildings

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first_imgNewsHealthPoliticsCall for free sanitary products in Council buildingsBy Alan Jacques – November 26, 2019 242 Previous articleLynch announced as Independent Director of the Federation of Irish SportNext articleRestoration of Kilmallock West Wall shortlisted for three awards Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Facebook Email WhatsAppcenter_img Print Twitter Cllr Elisa O’Donovan, Social Democrats. Photo: Cian ReinhardtSOCIAL Democrats councillor Elisa O’Donovan has called on the local authority to explore the provision of free sanitary products in all Limerick Council buildings, including community centres, swimming pools and libraries.At Monday’s meeting of the local authority, the City West representative said that women have an average of 507 periods in their menstrual lifetime at a cost of around €10,000 per person.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cllr O’Donovan also explained that 50 per cent of menstruating people aged 12 to 19 say they have experienced issues in paying for sanitary products.“The monthly burden of purchasing sanitary products falls on half of the Limerick population and is an issue of both equality and dignity. It is easy to understand why period poverty is a very real problem issue for low-income households and young people in our city and county,” she commented.“I am calling on Limerick Council to provide a range of free, adequate, safe and suitable sanitary products to be distributed through all public buildings. To start off with this would be in Council-owned buildings, swimming pools, libraries and community centres so as to tackle period poverty and de-stigmatise and normalise menstruation. I urge that we undergo a pilot project for this to start on International Women’s Day next year.”Sinn Féin councillor Sharon Benson, who supported the motion, called for an amendment to be made to include emergency accommodation and homeless shelters.Labour Party councillor Conor Sheehan pointed out that Limerick TD Jan O’Sullivan has done a lot of work on this issue at national level.Fianna Fáil councillor Eddie Ryan wanted to know how the proposal would be funded.“We’ve already had our budget,” he pointed out.Cllr Kevin Sheahan (FF) was also keen to comment on the matter.“I have no problem with this. It shows a maturing process to be thinking this way. I welcome that,” he said.A Council spokesman explained that the issue of the provision of free sanitary products in public buildings was debated in the Oireachtas earlier this year when the Government committed to bringing forward a series of measures to address the matter.“The Council will proceed with implementing the outcome of this process upon its completion at national level,” he said. Linkedinlast_img read more

Use cheap, local rapid tests: Minister Luhut

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first_imgCoordinating Maritime Affairs and Investment Minister Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan has urged the public to use locally produced rapid testing kits developed by the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT).The minister said the testing kits cost Rp 75,000 (US$5.13) each and had a 98 percent accuracy rate. “They used to be sold at Rp 150,000. I hope the price can get even lower,” Luhut said on Tuesday, as quoted by kompas.com.He added that people should use such tests to reduce dependence on imported medical equipment and to support local industry.Read also: Doubts loom over widespread use of rapid tests in virus-stricken IndonesiaExperts have raised concerns about the widespread use of rapid antibody testing as a prerequisite for certain activities during the pandemic. A post-market survey showed that many of the testing kits had sensitivities and specificities of less than 50 percent.The Health Ministry suggested that rapid tests were not to be used for diagnosis on July 13. This is in line with the World Health organization’s (WHO) recommendation that “a diagnosis of COVID-19 infection based on antibody response will […] only be possible in the recovery phase.”Minister Luhut said the government would never impose any policies that put people at a disadvantage, especially in relation to the COVID-19 response.“President Joko Widodo always reminds us to do what’s best for the people,” said the minister. (dpk)Topics :last_img read more

Keck appoints associate dean to new Office of Social Justice

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first_imgMosqueda said the Office of Social Justice will explore issues like environmental health concerns, racial disparities in the health care system and gun violence.   Mosqueda said that by establishing the Office of Social Justice, Keck officials can execute the Street Medicine program and other similar initiatives with more organization and efficiency. She said Bluthenthal’s role is centered on constructing the proper framework for the school’s social justice initiatives by involving the input of the Keck community. “He truly has a track record of being engaged in the community and working toward helping some of the most vulnerable members of our society,” Mosqueda said. “He’s just a wonderful human being. [He] has a true passion for [social justice] … He’s a proven leader.”   “We’re very interested in the nexus of medicine, health care … and social justice,” Mosqueda said. “USC is in … a premiere position to be looking at issues like equity in terms of access to health care … Our initiative relates to finding an organized way for us to approach these issues as a Keck community.” “I’ll need to meet with student groups and figure out what the issues are from their perspective,” Bluthenthal said. “… I look forward to being able to report very specific changes that we’re able to implement moving forward.” Mosqueda said she chose Bluthenthal for the position because of his history working with at-risk communities, as well as his reputation as a mentor to students and other faculty members at Keck. Bluthenthal said he will also work to identify and support Keck initiatives that are already making progress in the field of social justice. Office of Social Justice Associate Dean Ricky Bluthenthal is planning to hold a listening tour to speak with Keck School of Medicine students, faculty and staff about their expectations for the new office. (Julia Rosher/Daily Trojan) “I’ve seen what happens when people do and don’t have access to health care and some of the effects our policies have on the most vulnerable members of our society,” Mosqueda said.center_img Mosqueda was appointed interim dean of Keck in October 2017 before officially becoming dean last May. After conducting her own listening tour in 2017, she said she saw a need to explore social justice as a common thread throughout the school’s community. As a result, Mosqueda, with her experiences researching elder abuse and the criminal justice system, decided to launch the new office. According to the USC Street Medicine website, Keck currently runs a program that provides free care, counseling and medication for homeless individuals in more than 60 U.S. cities. The Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority reported that as of last year, 31,285 individuals in the city of Los Angeles are experiencing homelessness. The Keck School of Medicine appointed professor Ricky Bluthenthal on Jan. 1 as the associate dean of the Office of Social Justice, which was recently launched by Keck Dean Laura Mosqueda. “The basic idea is to achieve equitable access to the very best healthcare for people throughout society,” Bluthenthal said. “The social justice lens directs us to consider not only what goes on in a medical visit … but to consider the other 60 percent of our lives … and to try and mobilize elements of the medical school to address that additional 60 percent of the healthcare equation.” The first step in that process will consist of a listening tour, during which Bluthenthal will speak with Keck faculty, staff and students and gather information on what they expect from the new office. The Office, Mosqueda said, is currently in the process of drafting its mission statement. While Mosqueda said she is not aware of any other universities who have hired deans of social justice, Bluthenthal said a few other medical schools, like UC San Francisco, have incorporated a social justice component into their education programs. According to Keck’s website, Bluthenthal has contributed to over 125 scientific articles. Bluthenthal said his research focuses heavily on HIV and Hepatitis-C prevention for people who inject drugs. He began his research on the effectiveness of needle exchange programs in 1992 and said he plans to continue his work as the associate dean of social justice. last_img read more