Tag Archives: 上海后花园

Louis B. “Lou” Schipper

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first_imgLouis B. “Lou” Schipper Jr., 93, of Aurora, IN, passed away Saturday December 7, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio.He was born September 4, 1926 in Lawrenceburg, IN, son of the late Louis B. Schipper Sr. and Philomena (Englert) Schipper. He served his country as a Navy Seabee during WWII. He worked as a Electrician for Seagram’s, retiring after over 16 years of service. Prior to Seagram’s, Lou worked at CG&E and Lawrenceburg Utilities. He was a member of St Mary’s Catholic Church. Lou received his high school diploma from St. Xavier High School, when he was in his 90’s. He enjoyed woodworking, and liked rebuilding cars, especially restoring Model T’s. He built wooden bodies (depot Hack) for Model T’s, he also made cedar chests, benches, and a chicken coop. Lou rescued animals for 26 years. He loved the outdoors, Westerns, and was a history buff. Lou was instrumental in the development of the Indian Ridge Subdivision.Louis is survived by his loving spouse of 62 years, Dorothy “Dottie” (Banks) Schipper; sons, Louis B (Cheryl) Schipper III of Livermore, CA, and Father William Carl Schipper of Boston, MA; sister, Loretta Louise Henry of Rotonda West, FL; grandchildren, Louis B Schipper, IV of CA, Gretchen (David) Woody of New Braunfels, TX; niece, Gaye Lynn Hall of Aurora, IN; nephew, Jason Walston.He was preceded in death by his parents, Louis B Schipper, Sr., and Philomena Marie (Englert) Schipper; sister, Ida Mae Sawyer; brother, George Schipper.Friends will be received Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 9:00 am – 10:45 am at Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, 219 Mechanic Street, Aurora, Indiana.Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 203 Fourth Street, Wednesday December 11, 2019 at 11:00 am with Fr. Ben Sybert officiating.Interment will follow in the River View Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana. Military graveside services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions may be made to the PAWS or Crossroad Hospice of Cincinnati. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

Verizon Wireless Customers without Service in Northern Michigan

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMichigan- Residents throughout Verizon experienced spotty or no service Monday morning due to an outage.Outages were experienced all the way from Flint up to the UP. The problem with many phones and internet was connectivity issues. Those problems began to die down around 1:00pm.To see if you are still affected by the outages, visit http://downdetector.com/AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Alpena Municipal Council Applies for State Grant on Behalf of NOAANext MNRTF Recommends Grants for State, Projects Around NE Michiganlast_img

Negotiations continue on bringing hotel-conference center development to Clear Lake

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first_imgCLEAR LAKE — The city of Clear Lake is still working with developers on the possibility of bringing a $12 million hotel and conference center to the community.City Administrator Scott Flory says the city has been working with the unnamed developer since October on this project. “We commissioned a feasibility report, and since that time, we’ve had a developer show interest in Clear Lake, looking at a number of locations around the community for a possible development project that would include somewhere around 70-to-80-plus units in a hotel. It would also include a conference center that could accommodate up to 500 persons, and additionally a restaurant that could seat up to 200 people.”Flory says this type of a project has been on the city’s radar screen for a couple of years.  “We’ve always believed that a facility like this would enable Clear Lake to be more desirable as a retreat destination type community for professional conferences and things of that sort. We’re excited to continue to be working forward with a developer on opportunities that could bring something like that to our community.”Flory says talks are continuing with the developer on a preliminary development agreement that can be presented to the city council in the near future.  “I’m in negotiations with the developer, there’s other negotiations ongoing with the developer and land owners regarding potential sites for the project. I’m not at liberty to disclose any of those. The city is discussing potential development agreement incentives to help bring the project to Clear Lake.”Flory says it’s been over two decades since a major hotel project has been constructed in Clear Lake.last_img read more

Young Choreographers Set to Delight Audience at Third Annual Ballet Northwest…

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first_imgSubmitted by Ballet NorthwestFor the third year, choreographers from Olympia’s Ballet Northwest will surprise and delight the audience at the Young Choreographers Showcase (YCS) on August 24, 2014 at 7 p.m. at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts on the South Puget Sound Community College campus, an event created to allow Company dancers to explore creativity and leadership in dance.This year the event will showcase original productions from 11 choreographers. Nine are dancers from Ballet Northwest who range in age from 14 to 18. The other two are Ballet Northwest alumni, and recent graduates from the Hartt School at the University of Hartford, with Bachelors of Fine Arts in Dance.At the event, audiences will encounter dances in variety of styles, including ballet, modern dance and jazz. Choreographers get to take advantage of professional lighting and costumes. “This is the first year we’ll have the event at the Minnaert Center, which is a beautiful venue for dance,” said Josie Johnson, Co-Artistic Director at Ballet Northwest.Created in 2012, YCS gives the dancers at the Company an opportunity to create their own choreography, explore creativity and produce their own work. “Our dancers were getting more and more comfortable in different dance styles and were starting to show an interest in choreography. We saw the talent developing, so we created the Showcase to give these dancers the opportunity to stage their creativity,” said Ken Johnson, Co-Artistic Director at Ballet Northwest.In order to participate in the event, dancers had to submit an application outlining why they wanted to participate, the style of music they would use as well as how many dancers they would need to stage their production. Next, choreographers attended Choreography Master Classes taught by Master Teachers from the region.The Johnsons mentored the students throughout the creative process as well as at rehearsals. “We provided guidance and would pop into rehearsals to make sure things were going well and progressing. We’ve discovered that this process is a great leadership opportunity for the students. They have to manage rehearsal times, make sure dancers are available and take charge of their peers,” said Josie Johnson.Ken Johnson added, “It is exciting to see the amazing quality of work that these local, young choreographers produce. Audiences are continually blown away by the choreographer’s imagination coming to life on the stage.”Tickets are $12 (plus $3 Washington Center service fee) and can be purchased at: www.olytix.org or by calling 360-753-8586. Facebook56Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

A Glittering Celebration

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first_imgLeonardo Jewelers of Red Bank celebrated the expansion and renovation of its 35 E. Front St. store on Friday, March 15. The centerpiece of the work is the store’s new Rolex corner. Celebrating the completion of work are, from left: Sue Shearer, Leo Zeik, Joyce White, Marissa Conforti and Ann Leonard.last_img

Evolutionist Lost Faith Over Flawed Geology Lesson

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first_imgA college student’s Biblical faith could not survive a geology lesson that seemed to offer convincing proof that the earth was old – much older than the Bible said it was.  This test of his faith was a tipping point.  He began to question the Bible, and ended up becoming a prominent evolutionist.  His books and articles present a halfway sympathetic view of his former creationist friends, but he is convinced now that science has disproved the Bible and established the truth of evolution.  But now, the rest of the story: that evidence that challenged his faith back then has since been shown to be wrongly interpreted – so wrong, in fact, that even secular geologists now agree with the creationist interpretation.    The man is Ron Numbers, now a professor of the history of science and medicine at the University of Wisconsin.  The geology lesson was about the fossil forests in Yellowstone.  In the 1970s, geologists taught that what looked like 30 separate forests had grown on top of each other, one at a time, only to be buried by periodic volcanic eruptions.  A sign at Specimen Ridge in the park explained this as a matter of fact.  Estimates ranged from 20,000 years minimum to 30,000, or 50,000 years or more were required – in any case, far more than a conservative Genesis timeframe could allow.    On May 18, 1980, an explosive event with profound repercussions for geological science took place.  Mt. St. Helens erupted.  In one day, this event literally overturned the long-age interpretation of Specimen Ridge.  In the Roadside Geology book about Yellowstone sold in the park, geologist William Fritz described his reaction to mudflows he witnessed along the Toutle River in Washington.  “It was just like Yellowstone!” he exclaimed.  Since that widely-observed natural experiment in catastrophic geology, the work of volcanic mudflows has become the leading explanation for how the Yellowstone fossil forests were emplaced, layers and all.  The old sign that explained the old theory to millions of park visitors is long gone.    When telling his life story, Ron Numbers has pointed to that premature lesson about the Yellowstone fossil forests taking tens of thousands of years to form as the incident that began turning him away from creationism to evolutionism.  Most recently, in an interview in Salon Magazine published January 2, he was asked at what point his ideas about creation began to change.  He responded,I wish I knew.  There are a few moments that proved crucial for me.  I went to Berkeley in the ’60s as a graduate student in history and learned to read critically.  That had a profound influence on me.  I was also exposed to critiques of young earth creationism.  The thing that stands out in my memory as being decisive was hearing a lecture about the fossil forest of Yellowstone, given by a creationist who’d just been out there to visit.  He found that for the 30 successive layers you needed — assuming the most rapid rates of decomposition of lava into soil and the most rapid rates of growth for the trees that came back in that area — at least 20,000 to 30,000 years.  The only alternative the creationists had to offer was that during the year of Noah’s flood, these whole stands of forest trees came floating in, one on top of another, until you had about 30 stacked up.  And that truly seemed incredible to me.  Just trying to visualize what that had been like during the year of Noah’s flood made me smile.He went on to describe how he and a fellow Bible-believing student wrestled all night with the implications of this explanation.  “Before dawn, we both decided the evidence was too strong,” he said.  This was a crucial night for me because I realized I was abandoning … the authority of Genesis.”    He did not indicate whether he had ever heard “the rest of the story” about Yellowstone.And thus, an evolutionist professor, who writes books against creationists, was molded – partly but significantly from a flawed interpretation of geological evidence.  Ron Numbers is the embodiment of a fable we told in our 11/13/2006 commentary.  An evolutionary explanation is presented as a matter of fact; it shakes a student’s faith; the damage is done; he “sees the light” of evolution and becomes a convert.  Then, years later, new evidence comes out showing that the creation explanation was trustworthy all along.    In both that case and this one, we are not saying that secular geologists have come running back to Genesis confessing their sins and saying the Bible-believers were right.  Of course they continue to talk long ages; the Yellowstone eruptions were umpty hundred thousand years ago with multiple episodes, the Nevada eruptions were similarly age-old, etc. (as if they were there with a stopwatch).  What’s important to remember is that data does not interpret itself.  Look again at the other story links at the end of the 11/13/2006 commentary.  Despite geologists’ philosophical commitment to the geologic column and its evolutionary foundation, they continually revise their stories, sometimes overturning them completely, as new evidence comes in (e.g., last week, 01/03/2007).  It just so happens that the latest interpretations of the Yellowstone and Nevada deposits are consistent with a catastrophic, flood-geology, young-earth view.  As such, they present neither a necessary nor sufficient reason to doubt the trustworthiness of the Bible.  The sudden catastrophic model is superior in many respects to the slow-and-gradual model.  Since the Bible-believing scientists propounded this idea before it became the new consensus, even when Ron considered it incredible and laughable, and no one took it seriously at the time, you could even say that in this instance the Bible-believing, young-earth creationists have been vindicated.It’s ironic that the old-age view was presented by “a creationist.”  Obviously not all creationists accept the Genesis timetable.  But creationists who subscribe to an old-earth or theistic-evolution view should ponder the impact of that view on Ron as a student.  It did not help him resolve conflicts between the Bible and “science” – it eroded his trust in the Bible completely.  Some old-earth creationists like Davis Young have touted the Yellowstone fossil forests as proof positive that the earth could not be fitted into a few thousand years.  Now they have egg on their faces.  Regardless of one’s position on the age of the earth, one lesson is clear: what science is claiming today is always subject to change.  Using today’s consensus to argue against the Bible’s history, which has withstood scrutiny longer than any scientific claim, is risky business and of doubtful support for Biblical worldview construction.Ron Numbers’ view of creationism is more nuanced and sympathetic than that of the typical Darwinist, owing to his personal experience.  But since that fateful geology lesson, it appears he began interpreting subsequent scientific claims through a new lens – an evolutionary, materialist lens.  One can only wonder how differently his life would have turned out had someone rushed into that class at the end of the lecture, yelling, “Wait!  Mt. St. Helens has just erupted, and billions of tons of logs are being deposited in layers along the Toutle River in a matter of hours!  It’s just like Yellowstone!”    As stated in the 11/13/2006 commentary, unbelief often becomes a deep trench once it starts.  It is highly doubtful Ron Numbers would retrace his worldview journey back to that point if someone were to tell him about the paradigm shift at Yellowstone.  By this time he has cut too deep a trench to climb out.  His reputation among his peers is also on the line.  Few people who publish books taking strong positions ever change their minds.  The twig is bent; the die is cast.  He is no longer the Learnuh, he is the Mosstuh.  He has seen the light.  Miracles can happen, but the new Yellowstone story is unlikely to make someone who touts the so-called “overwhelming evidence for evolution” change sides at this late date.  Pastors, parents, and Christian teachers wanting to prepare students for adulthood should take some sober lessons from this case study.    In the first place, Biblical history should be presented as more than just stories.  It needs to be shown to correspond to actual historical events.  The new Archaeological Study Bible is a great resource to show the correspondence between Biblical history and archaeology and history from other sources.    Secondly, Christian students should not be insulated from contradictory ideas.  Conflicts are inevitable anyway, so it is very counterproductive to avoid them.  Children and teens want to know their beliefs are sound.  Instruction about scientific controversies must be age-appropriate, of course, but in Ron’s case, why did it take college age at Berkeley (of all places) for him to discover critical thinking?  That should have started before age 10.  (Note: “Critical thinking” at liberal universities often becomes imbalanced questioning of traditional values and religious beliefs – see quote by Berkeley law professor Phillip Johnson in the header of the Baloney Detector).  It is by facing difficulties head-on that confidence in one’s worldview is built.  Like Johnson has often teased, we should teach students more about evolution than the schools want them to hear!  A student can’t understand our modern world without understanding Darwinism and evolutionary theory and the best arguments put forth to support it.  But, unlike in public schools, they should also get the scientific arguments against it.  A vast majority of American citizens believe that.    Thirdly, and even more important, students should learn the limits of science.  They need to develop a healthy skepticism of the ability of fallible human science to make knowledge claims about the past (or even the present, for that matter).*Ron grew up in a Seventh-Day Adventist church.  Though outside the mainstream of Protestant tradition, SDAs are staunch Bible believers.  However much his well-meaning parents and teachers might have thought they were protecting students by teaching only the young-earth view and avoiding contradictory scientific views from secular geology and evolutionary biology, it is clear in hindsight that insulation from challenge can backfire.  By high school and college age, young adults are questioning the beliefs they were taught as children anyway.  We should help them learn how to do it right.  Dodging hard questions or making a child feel guilty for doubt is a bad example.  It gives the impression that Christianity is anti-intellectual, or too weak to stand up under examination.  The great Christian physicist James Clerk Maxwell believed that Christianity was the only system that allowed full and free investigation, without sacred spots that were off limits to scrutiny.    Chuck Colson and Nancy Pearcey gave a memorable example of facing controversy in chapter 5 of their book How Now Shall We Live? (Tyndale, 1999).  They portrayed a father confronted by his daughter’s questions about evolution.  He didn’t have ready answers at the time.  But he did a brave thing that made an impression on her: he answered, “I don’t know, but I’ll find out.”  And he let her know he was willing to lay his own faith on the line to find answers.  So with his daughter, he did a research project on the evidence for creation and taught her more than just answers to her specific questions: he taught her that a Christian need not be afraid of investigating the evidence.  He showed her that the way to handle a doubt is to confront it with research and honest analysis of both sides of a controversy.If Ron Numbers had left the safety of church and home armed with critical thinking skills and an arsenal of sound strategies to consider skeptical claims fairly, how much different would his life had been?  It’s hard to say.  Some students will rebel for other reasons: perhaps, a rationalization to explore their lusts, or a desire to fit in with a peer group.  It appears, though, that Ron has maintained a soft spot for his childhood worldview, as if nostalgic for it.  Some ardent anticreationists grew up in a church but were completely unprepared for the allure of evolutionary propaganda.  They not only embraced it readily, but became ardent foes of Christianity.  E. O. Wilson and Michael Shermer come to mind.  From Ron Numbers’ own testimony, though, it seems he and his friend sincerely wanted to keep their faith.  They respected truth and yet were conflicted by what appeared to be solid evidence against what they had been taught.  A solid education in handling difficulties and controversies honestly and critically is good insurance against sudden challenges by conflicting ideas.It goes without saying that bad beliefs deserve to fall when unable to withstand a challenge.  Some Christians fall for foolish ideas that are not supportable from the Bible or scientific evidence, like myths of NASA support for Joshua’s long day, or speculations about where heaven is in the visible universe.  Critical thinking demands the honesty to abandon a belief that is no longer defensible after rigorous investigation of the evidence and research into all the well-reasoned points of view.  The same standard cuts both ways.  When will the evolutionists abandon Haeckel’s; embryos, junk DNA, vestigial organs and the other discredited props for their beliefs?    Unfortunately for Ron, his doubts about a young earth were aggravated by legitimate doubts about the credibility of SDA’s prophetess Ellen White – a writer no other Christian groups consider authoritative.  This contributed to him tossing the whole religious package altogether.  Most SDAs are very congenial and sincere people, but any Christian who gets too closely tied to one particular sect or denomination should take warning.  Beware if you belong to any group that becomes ingrown and isolated, trusts only its own material and shuns fellowship with other true Christians in other denominations.  Sectarianism can pose a setup for rejection of all Christianity by the young when maybe the fault is with unusual teachings or practices of the denomination, not the Bible itself.  The more a church, tradition, or a strong leader becomes the authority rather than the Bible itself, the greater the risk.Science is a search for truth, but it is not the truth.  It is limited in its domain (the observable world).  It is done by fallible humans.  Science is tentative at best, and often wrong.  There are deep and abiding philosophical doubts about the ability of mere mortals to comprehend reality by our senses with any confidence that what we deem scientific today is true, necessary, universal and certain.*  It bears repeating: evidence does not interpret itself.  Over and over in these pages you have read about evolutionists twisting and forcing contradictory evidence into the rigid container of their world view.  The same evidence can often bear one or more other equally-valid interpretations.  At best, science can claim evidence is consistent with a belief but cannot thereby claim it is True with a capital T.  Even the claim of consistency is a judgment call.  It often involves willfully ignoring some inconsistent evidence rivals might consider weighty.    The next time someone shows you supposedly incontrovertible evidence that the Bible cannot be trusted, and that science has proved it wrong, don’t be so quick to believe the claim.  Like the father in the story above, go find out.  The Bible has withstood millennia of attacks from all sides.  Sometimes you may have to wait a few years for the scientific consensus to shift back, or for a volcano to blow the old theory up in smoke.  A world view worth living by is one that is rooted and grounded in conviction that has been tested by challenge.  Victorious faith requires both exercise and armor.  Young people should go to “world view boot camp” for both.  Exercise teaches one how to use the armor, and the sparring of ideas allows quality armor to show its true mettle.(Visited 61 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Beating hunger with the ‘Miracle Tree’

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first_img1 September 2010South Africa’s 2010 Female Entrepreneur of the Year, Mavis Mathabatha, heads up a community project to cultivate the Moringa or “Miracle Tree”, the leaves of which have astounding nutritional properties.The Lammangata Moringa project, based in Tooseng village in the Ga-Mphahlele region of Limpopo province, produces and packages up to 10 000 tons a year of all-natural Moringa Leaf Powder.The project was launched in March 2009 by community-based organisation Sedikong sa Lerato in partnership with charity organisation Starfish Greathearts Foundation.The leaves of Moringa oleifera are loaded with essential nutrients, far surpassing the vitamin and mineral content of carrots, spinach, bananas and oranges combined. They also contain more protein and calcium than milk, plus all nine essential amino acids.The Moringa tree is easily cultivated in semi-arid areas, grows quickly, and is not invasive.The project, which employs 12 women and five men, also offers Moringa seedlings and education on nutrition, at no cost, to rural communities in the province. In 2009, they disseminated over 500 seedlings to rural households and child-care projects in the area, and brought nutrition education and Moringa awareness to more than 1 000 people.“I want to make an impact in my area, province and across the country through this project,” said Mathabatha, who walked away with the top award and R365 000 in prize money at the Female Entrepreneur of the Year awards ceremony in the Eastern Cape on the weekend.Mathabatha was the founder of Sedikong sa Lerato, which aims to alleviate hunger and poverty and promote healthy living and a strong sense of self for the orphans and vulnerable children of Tooseng.According to Mathabatha, using Moringa tree products has reduced malnutrition among over 350 children supported by the organisation.“Before we started, malnutrition was very prevalent,” she says on the Starfish Greathearts Foundation website. “But since we’ve started adding Moringa to the children’s food, we have seen remarkable results – the children no longer suffer from malnutrition.”Speaking after the award ceremony on the weekend, Mathabatha said a 25-hectare Moringa plantation had recently been planned. “This will drastically increase the production and sales of Moringa Leaf Powder, and proceeds from leaf powder sales will generate income to support our child-care initiatives,” she said.SAinfo reporter and BuaNewslast_img read more

Archer Tagle settles for silver in recurve event

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first_imgNicole Marie Tagle. Photo from Philippine Sports Commission Facebook pageArcher Nicole Marie Tagle settled for silver in the individual women’s recurve, bowing to Diananda Choirunisa of Indonesia in the gold medal match in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games Sunday at National Sports Complex in Bukit Jalil, Malaysia.Engaged in a tight battle, the final went down to the fifth set before the 15-year-old Dumaguete native yielded to the top-seeded Choirunisa, 4-6.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension LATEST STORIES LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Uichico, Gilas confident as PH shoots for 18th basketball gold SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief MOST READ Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics PLAY LIST 00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Tagle earlier beat Myanmar’s Thida New in the semifinals, 6-2, to assure herself of the podium finish.It was still a triumphant campaign for Tagle, who gave the Philippines its second silver medal in the biennial meet.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutMale standouts Luis Gabriel Moreno and Florante Matan missed out on advancing to the semifinals of the individual men’s recurve.Rogelio Miguel Tremedal, Mark Javier, Pia Elizabeth Biduare, Kareel Meer Hongitan, and Mary Queen Ybañez all failed to progress to the quarterfinals. View comments WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s weddinglast_img read more

SEA Games: PH’s Lois Go settles for bronze in Ladies’ golf

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first_imgSEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Cignal’s Jose named D-League MVP Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Thai powers Atthaya Titikul (14-under-par 199) and Thitapa Pakdeesettakul (7-under-par 206) took the gold and silver medals, respectively. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout MOST READ Read Next LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games LATEST STORIES LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games Lois Go finished as the third best golfer in the Ladies’ Individual Stroke Play in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games in Kuala Lumpur.Go registered 4-under-par 209 to take the Philippines’ first medal in golf so far in the regional games.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

10 months agoAgent of Rugani says Juventus never considered sale

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Agent of Rugani says Juventus never considered saleby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe agent of Daniele Rugani says Juventus have never considered selling him.The centre-back was linked with a massive transfer to Chelsea last summer.”Rugani has never been placed on the market by Juventus and that means he has done something right,” agent Davide Torchia told RMC Radio.“Without doubt he will stay at Juve in January. Rugani is an old-fashioned player, committed to his profession and with above all else the desire to improve himself.“Rugani is a reliable player, someone worthy of Juventus, who ensures he is always ready. A player doesn’t stay at Juventus for four years without deserving it.” last_img read more