Monthly Archives: June 2021

Leinster sign five players on long-term deals

by ,

first_img Leinster Rugby are delighted to announce that Ireland back-row duo; Shane Jennings and Sean O’Brien, have both agreed new three-year deals with the province. This follows the news that international second row Devin Toner, Fergus McFadden and Jack McGrath have also each signed new two year deals.Dubliner Shane Jennings, 29, has made 118 Leinster appearances over two spells since making his debut in the 2002/03 season and the St. Mary’s College man also featured in the 2008/09 Heineken Cup winning side. He has played in 15 fixtures so far this season and has been capped on nine occasions by Ireland.Shane Jennings commented: “It’s an exciting time for the province and I am delighted to re-sign with Leinster for a further three years. There’s a determination within the group to push on and continue to improve and the aspirations of my team-mates as well as the coaching staff was a key factor in my decision to stay.“Since re-joining the province in the summer of 2008 Leinster has gone from strength to strength on and off the park and I’m proud to be a part of a club that has such strong values and ambitions. It has always been my ambition to be a part of a successful Leinster side and I have no doubt that with the competitive nature of the up-and-coming and established members of our squad that the future looks bright.”Meanwhile, 23-year-old Tullow native Sean O’Brien, whose impressive form was recently rewarded with the Bank of Ireland Player of the Month honour for December, is another successful product of the Leinster Academy and he follows in the footsteps of Cian Healy, a fellow Heineken Cup winner and member of the 2007 Ireland Under-20 Grand Slam winning side, to have committed his long-term future to the province. A product of the Leinster Youths system, O’Brien has made 47 appearances in all, scoring nine tries to date and he has earned four Ireland caps since making his international bow in November 2009.Sean O’Brien said: “I am delighted to commit myself for a further three years to Leinster. I believe there is something very special about this club and with so many talented players at our disposal – and with the management team working well – I am confident that the great achievements of recent years can be matched or even maybe surpassed.“While it was flattering to have interest from overseas, I desperately want to be part of the Leinster story for the foreseeable future.”Devin Toner made the first of his three Ireland appearances during the November series and since 2005/06 he has made 56 Leinster appearances (including 11 to date in this campaign). The former Castleknock College second row, who hails from Meath, was a member of the 2008/09 Heineken Cup winning squad and has featured in four Heineken Cup games so far this season.Devin Toner reflected: “I think that the high competition levels within the squad this year have driven us all on and the upshot of that has been our recent good run of form.“I have been very fortunate to have worked alongside the likes of Mal (O’Kelly), Trev (Hogan), Leo (Cullen) and Hinesy (Nathan Hines) in recent years and there’s a really strong base within the squad where we’re all trying to help each other and improve one another. I’m really pleased to sign up with Leinster.” “All five players have come through the Leinster Academy system and it is vital for the future growth of both Leinster and Irish rugby that we retain our leading indigenous talent. It is a timely boost that all five have decided to sign contract extensions at this stage in their careers.” TAGS: Leinster In 16 appearances so far this season Fergus McFadden has shown his versatility and consistency in scoring 33 points (including five tries). The 24-year-old centre/wing, who hails from The Curragh, has won 10 Ireland ‘A’ caps and was voted the tournament’s MVP in the 2009 Churchill Cup. In all he has played 41 times for Leinster since making his debut in the 2007/08 season.Fergus McFadden said: “I am pleased to commit to my home province because I believe that this is the ideal environment to advance my personal and, most significantly, collective team ambitions.“It’s a really exciting time to be playing here and all of the players and staff share the same determination to push on and become a consistent force both in the Magners League and in the Heineken Cup.”Former Ireland Under-20 prop Jack McGrath, 21, has made three Senior appearances since making his debut last year. He has also played seven games in the British & Irish Cup and was a try-scorer in the victory over Worcester Warriors on Sunday.Jack McGrath added: “I am really enjoying my rugby at present and hopefully I can push on and make it into the Senior squad over the coming weeks.“There’s a good incentive for young players to perform well and seeing the likes of Dominic (Ryan), Rhys (Ruddock) and Eoin O’Malley take their chances this year does give you a boost. It has been great to learn off the top international talent in the pack and I’m aiming to build on that for the months and years ahead.”Commenting on all five new deals, Leinster Coach Joe Schmidt said: “We are delighted that all five players have committed their long term futures to the province. That both Shane and Sean have, at separate intervals, led the team in Leo Cullen’s absence this season speaks volumes about the leadership roles that both assume within our panel.“Both Fergus and Devin have displayed great consistency in their displays this season, while Jack is an exciting front row talent who started off in the Academy has been upgraded from a Development contract. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Join Martin Corry on Rugby World’s Six Nations Rome tour

by ,

first_img RW Travel ExperienceWatch England’s first fixture of the 2018 Six Nations in the company of former captain Martin Corry, on an exclusive trip from us here at Rugby World in partnership with Gullivers Sports Travel. Rome has been a picturesque fixture on the international rugby circuit since Italy played their first Six Nations game on home soil – defeating Scotland – in 2000, and here is the ultimate opportunity to be in on the action in one of the most striking cities in the world. As well as getting match tickets to see England take on Italy, you will be staying in luxury accommodation and travelling in style throughout, with private charter flights from London and deluxe coach transfers. On match day, you are invited to an exclusive morning with former England captain Martin Corry, who will share insights and personal experiences from his playing days – from being in the World Cup-winning squad of 2003 and leading the England squad out on no fewer than 17 occasions, to touring with the British & Irish Lions in Australia and New Zealand, as well as his successful career with Leicester Tigers. What a view! Take in sights like the Colosseum as well as the rugby while in Rome. Photo: Shutterstock Enjoy England’s first fixture of the 2018 Six Nations in the company of former captain Martin Corry on an exclusive trip to Rome for Rugby World readers This tour is provided by Gullivers in partnership with Rugby World and Tripsmiths. From £899 per person, departing 3 February 2018. Click here for more information and to book Don’t be surprised, though, if the whole family want in on the action. According to Corry: “This is the weekend when wives and partners suddenly take a keen interest in watching rugby!”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS On the ball: Martin Corry in action for England against Italy in 2007. Photo: Getty ImagesYou’ll have ample opportunity to pick Corry’s brain before revelling in the epic atmosphere of Stadio Olimpico as England begin the defence of their Six Nations crown.Based in four-star accommodation in the heart of the Rome, there will also be time to swap one stadium for another and visit the Colosseum, or explore the Vatican Museum before heading home.last_img read more

The South African lock on Scotland’s radar

by ,

first_imgStormers second-row David Meihuizen talks to Gavin Harper about his international options For now, Meihuizen wants to see out his current deal with Stormers and Western Province, especially with the incentive of facing the British & Irish Lions should the tour go ahead this summer.“I want to stay here for now and my dream is to play against the Lions. It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and it would be great to be part of that.”A chance to face the touring Lions would also give Meihuizen a potential shot at one of his heroes.“I always looked up to Victor Matfield – I am not the biggest guy, so I pride myself on my lineout, and he was one of the best in the world, but another guy I’ve always admired is Alun Wyn Jones, so it would be an unbelievable experience if I got to play against him.”Flashback: Springboks lock Victor Matfield in action against the Lions in 2009 (Getty Images)Whether his international future lies in green and gold, or navy blue, Meihuizen knows that he wants to cement himself as one of the greats of his time. “I want people to remember me – I want to create my own legacy and be a role model for kids in the future.”A giant of a man with giant ambitions, David Meihuizen could well wind up towering over the international game for some time to come if his career continues on its lofty trajectory. The South African lock on Scotland’s radarStormers lock David Meihuizen was something of a latecomer to rugby but he is already on Scotland’s radar.The 23-year-old, 6ft 9in lock has enjoyed a rapid rise to the sport, having been a water polo player of some note in his youth. His rugby career began at Paarl Boys’ High School in 2015, where he was catapulted into the first XV.“I didn’t really play rugby at the time, but the coach asked if I wanted to try out (for the first team) and I made it into the squad,” he says. “I decided to play one more year of rugby, and then I was offered a place by Western Province’s academy.”A handful of games for the U19s and a bursary at the University of Cape Town followed. Meihuizen continued to shine on the field and made his Stormers debut last year.“It was daunting at first playing with some of the Springboks guys – I didn’t want to let them down – but the more time that I’ve trained with them and spent with them, it has become easier.”With a Glasgow-born mum and a grandfather from Edinburgh, Scottish Rugby have been in touch about his availability, but Meihuizen is keen to keep his international options open – for the time being at least – with his current focus on playing for the country of his birth.“Obviously the ultimate goal would be to represent the Springboks,” he says. “I spoke to them (Scottish Rugby) about possibly moving to Edinburgh, but I decided that the time wasn’t quite right.“My grandad is from Edinburgh and my mum’s from Glasgow and they’ve always told us of our Scottish heritage, especially my grandad.“I remember once my grandad gave us kilts as a present for Christmas, and when we were really young, I must only have been about four, he let my brother and I watch Braveheart.Anthem time: Scotland’s players line up during last year’s Autumn Nations Cup (SNS Group/Getty Images)“We were scarred for a while after because it’s not the kind of film most young kids watch, but he’s always been really proud of his Scottish roots.“A few of my mates at school used to joke and say that I was destined to play for Scotland.” High rise: David Meihuizen (top right) in action for the Stormers (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Meihuizen is keen to stress that he wouldn’t see playing for Scotland as a second-best option, saying: “If that is what comes, then I would be very proud to represent Scotland,” he said, while adding the pride may be too much for his grandfather.“I think he might combust if I was to play for Scotland – it could be too much for him to cope with! He would be really proud.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

New Zealand: “Unable to adopt” covenant

by ,

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Covenant Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Jul 9, 2012 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Anglican Taonga] As expected, the General Synod of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia said a final: ‘No’ to the proposed Anglican covenant today.But it did so quietly, and the original motion was amended to stress this church’s desire to remain tightly knit with the Communion.And to suggest that the early parts of the covenant – the non-contentious bits about “Our Inheritance in Faith” etc. – “are a useful starting point” for future Anglican thinking about their church.The first clause of the draft motion, as proposed by Tony Fitchett and the Ven. Turi Hollis, and set out in the synod agenda, was short and to the point.That simply proposed that this church: Declines to adopt the proposed Anglican Covenant.That’s been replaced by the resolution which says this church:Is unable to adopt the proposed Anglican Covenant due to concerns about aspects of Section 4, but subscribes to Sections 1, 2, and 3 as currently drafted as a useful starting point for consideration of our Anglican understanding of the church.And where the second clause of the proposed motion – as set out in the synod papers – had proposed that this church affirms the commitment of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia to the life of the Anglican Communion.The resolution passed turns the full stop after ‘Communion’ into a comma, and adds a clause which reads: including the roles and responsibilities of the four Instruments of Communion as they currently operate.The amendments are subtle. And they sparked some subtle debate, too, as to the exact nuances of meaning of the word “subscribes,”  and whether “considers” or “regards” might be better choices.But Archbishop David Moxon, who drove the changes, felt they were necessary to send the right signals, both to enhance the province’s relationship with the wider Communion, and to stay consistent with the resolution passed by the 2010 General Synod which met in Gisborne, which had agreed to the first three sections of the covenant “in principle.”He’d made contact with Fitchett and Hollis a few days before the synod, and they were happy to go with his amendments.Fitchett spoke to his motion. Retold briefly what had become of the proposed covenant as it did the rounds of the Episcopal units – it didn’t travel well – and detailed what was in it.He raised no particular objection to the first three parts, but claimed that section 4, which holds out the possibility of “relational consequences” for provinces deemed to have erred, was another matter.“The stated purpose of the covenant is to enable ‘fuller ecclesial communion’ – it is an interesting concept that one achieves communion by ex-communication.”He claimed Section 4’s “approach to honest difference is contrary to our Anglican understanding of the nature of the Church, to the way of Christ, and to justiceAnglicans, he said, are used to disagreement.“There has always been disagreement in the communion, and in the Church of England from which it grew.“Over time Anglicans progressed from burning those with whom they disagree, to a painfully won acceptance that people of differing belief can live and worship together in one church despite those differences.”The full text of the resolution is here (http://anglicantaonga.org.nz/Features/adopt). Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Zealand: “Unable to adopt” covenant Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

New Zealand: Three cathedral options unveiled for Christchurch

by ,

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA David Krohne says: Anglican Communion John Barton says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Pamela Cobb says: Rector Washington, DC April 4, 2013 at 5:42 pm I congratulate all involved for giving Cantabrians three interesting architectural choices from which to choose, and for allowing us in the rest of the world also to see drawings of each of them. It will be interesting to see which one they choose to build, and how the Holy Spirit works among them in their deliberations. May they have all the blessings they want, and abundantly so. Amen. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis April 4, 2013 at 5:43 pm I’d be inclined to vote for Option B. The “contemporary” option has about as much charm as what passes for so-called “contemporary” church music today and would look dated and hackneyed by the time it was completed. Submit a Job Listing Robert Alder R.I.B.A says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 14, 2013 at 2:48 am Oops! I vote for restored, not traditional! Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Zealand: Three cathedral options unveiled for Christchurch Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Pamela Cobb says: April 4, 2013 at 10:22 pm I would favor the contemporary design. Gothic was contemporary way many years ago. Gods creation moves forward, not backward. Contemporary designs favor function and that is what is needed and a break with tradition if what happened when an act of God destroyed the old forms.“Behold, I make all things new” The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing June 14, 2013 at 2:45 am I vote for the TRADITIONAL! Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR neville sutherland says: May 27, 2017 at 12:27 am I would echo the words and sentiments expressed by Robert Alder R.I.B.A. in his July 16, 2013 entry. I lived 12 years in Christchurch in the 1970’s and the Cathedral was an ever present reminder of an enduring relationship, however barely acknowledged, with my christian upbringing. I shed a tear when first confronted with the obscene sight of the shattered tower and prayed that the building would be restored anew. But times change and so has my view of the Cathedral. The city is metamorphosing into a new Christchurch and what better way to exemplify that than the new “contemporary” design. All strength Bishop Matthews to your achieving this soaring, beautiful vision! Alan Ogden says: Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rosemary Edward says: July 16, 2013 at 5:01 pm As a resident of the UK I have had the privilege of visiting your beautiful country . As an Architect I was devastated to see the effects of the earthquake on the City of Christchurch and the Cathedral itself , which we visited before the quake . The proposal for a modern cathedral must be the most favourable option , a truly lovely concept and one which I would have been proud to have been involved . You must take the opportunity and grasp the metal . Inspired but restrained , as a defiance of whatever Nature can produce . I am truly envious of the Artists /Architects who had the vision . I Sincerely hope that I will have the opportunity to visit again to see the Design completed . April 20, 2013 at 6:10 pm My preferance is for the contempory cathedral as it strongly suggests Growing forward into the futureI would prefer a huge contempory cross at the eastern end rather than the rather catholic depictiun of mother and child currently featured.Also the rose window appears to be disected by a metal bar in the outside window, rathert than being made more of a feature of the west end, like as in our dear old ruined cathedral. Comments are closed. Les Singleton says: Submit a Press Release Angela Macfarlane says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 21, 2017 at 9:44 am I vote for traditional. Other places have raised great sums of money in recent times for their cathedrals, Brisbane Cathedral here in Australia a notable example though admittedly, like Washington or Liverpool, the early stages were slow. Are there not major benefactors in New Zealand and beyond. The sums are not enormous when one sees what is spent to build houses etc etc – or spent (here in Australia at least) on armaments. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET John Bunyan says: ross edward ward says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL April 16, 2013 at 9:53 pm I attended services for several years in the Cathedral so love that building but think that to repair it would be too costly and take too long, I like the second option because it resembles the old and will be cheaper to build. I don’t care for the third option it doesn’t give the impression of looking very permanent Comments (14) Tags Press Release Service By Lloyd AshtonPosted Apr 4, 2013 Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Gordon & Elizabeth Handley-Packham says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Judith Palmer says: May 1, 2013 at 1:20 am We are members of the Cathedral community and have given its replacement a considerable amount of thought and discussed it with friends. We consider that the best option is the third one ‘Contemporary’ despite our love for the original traditional building design. We have come to this conclusion based on the thought that it is planned to have modern buildings in the square area so a traditional Gothic design would not, in our opinion ‘fit in’. Also the building must be designed for the younger generation, not us ‘oldies’. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 May 3, 2013 at 1:20 am I vote for TRADITIONAL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Taonga] Cantabrians have this morning glimpsed what shape a new Cathedral in the Square could take.Three design options have been unveiled – restored, traditional and contemporary – and over the next month the Diocese of Christchurch and the Church Property Trustees will take those options to the public.They’ll explain the pros and cons of each at a number of presentations and public forums during April. And they will actively seek feedback from the public about those three choices.The diocese has set up a website: www.cathedralconversations.org.nz for that express purpose. This site, which features detailed info on each option and solicits feedback, will be live until May 3.At that point the Cathedral Property Group will collate and review that feedback – and feed that summarized info to the Church Property Trustees, which will select a preferred option.Those three options are:Restored – a back-to-foundations restoration of the iconic cathedral, but seismically strengthened. Quantity surveyors estimate this would cost a minimum of $104 million and up to $221 million, depending on how many years are needed to raise the money.If everything went to plan, restoring the building would take 6.5 years. But if fundraising is slow, the quantity surveyors suggest it could take more than 20 years to complete.Christchurch Cathedral restoredTraditional – this option  acknowledges the Gothic Revival form of the old cathedral, but veers away from heavy masonry and slate in favor of lightweight materials. It would be clad in lightweight glass reinforced concrete, with a laminated timber interior and a copper-over-ply roof.This option would feature a belltower – but in its upper reaches, this tower would be filigreed.Quantity surveyors estimate the traditional model cathedral would cost between $85 million and $181 million, and would take between five and 22 years to finish, again depending on how quickly money can be raised.Christchurch Cathedral traditionalContemporary – the modern option still acknowledges the past, with its central axis aligned along Worcester St, and the “praying hands” curved roof, recalling the vertical forms and pointed arches of Gothic Revival architecture.This option would feature a restored rose window on the western glass wall, and a glass and steel belltower. It has been estimated at $56 million to $74 million and, depending on the time needed to raise funds, it could take between 4.5 and 9.5 years to build.Christchurch Cathedral contemporaryThe three options were outlined yesterday to the Chapter of ChristChurch Cathedral, and then again to a combined meeting of the Cathedral Property Group, the Church Property Trustees and the Diocesan Standing Committee.Consulting engineer Marcus Read launched the presentation to the Chapter, and said he was “really excited to be able to show the public that the last 18 months work has got us somewhere – other than to court.“We are hoping this project will inspire the city to look to the future.”Bishop Victoria began the second presentation by quoting from 2nd Chronicles, where King Solomon dedicates the temple he had built:18  ‘But will God indeed reside with mortals on earth? Even heaven and the highest heaven cannot contain you, how much less this house that I have built! 19  Have regard to your servant’s prayer and his plea, O Lord  my God, heeding the cry and the prayer that your servant prays to you. 20  May your eyes be open day and night towards this house, the place where you promised to set your name, and may you heed the prayer that your servant prays towards this place.Yesterday’s presentations were not without humor. One of the Standing Committee members declared his “reassurance” that each of the three options would include a restored rose window, and material and artifacts salvaged from the ruined cathedral.To which Bishop Victoria quipped: “To the best of our knowledge, the effigy of Bishop Harper is just fine.”The options will be outlined to a media conference today, then on Monday eight information stands will be erected around the city and 15,000 postcards outlining the options will be distributed.On Wednesday evening, April 10, the first public forum will be held at the Westpac Business and Community Hub in Christchurch, and on the following Saturday the options will again be described to the Christchurch Diocesan Synod.The roadshow heads to Auckland on Tuesday, April 16; at the invitation of Catholic Archbishop John Dew, Bishop Victoria Matthews will explain the options to the Catholic Bishops. And she’ll also take part in a lunchtime forum at Parnell’s Holy Trinity Cathedral.There’ll be a presentation by the Church Property Trustees to the Christchurch City Council’s Earthquake Forum on Thursday April 18, and another public forum on April 24 at the Westpac Business and Community Hub.Public feedback on the options will be collated and circulated to the Cathedral Project Group for review after May 3 – and thus equipped, the CPG, Church Property Trustees and the Diocesan Standing Committee will decide on their preferred option.This option will then be outlined to the High Court, which will come to a decision on the case brought by the Great Christchurch Buildings Trust to stop deconstruction of the quake-damaged cathedral.Today’s rollout of the three options is the latest stage in an process which has seen the formulation of design guidelines, and a functional brief, a study tour of selected overseas cathedrals, and the invitation for members of the diocese to take part via blog or email in “Cathedral Conversations.” April 7, 2013 at 4:35 am I am in my seventy’s and love the contemporary option not just for the idea that I should still be alive when it is finished and that it is the cheapest option but to me it is an exciting concept and I hope it is the one that is chosen. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events April 4, 2013 at 5:08 pm I would think the traditional design with modern materials would be the best solution.Today’s contemporary is tomorrow’s dated; and why use material that is not earthquake safe? Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Disillusioned Anglican teens in Zambia set up their own ‘church’

by ,

first_imgDisillusioned Anglican teens in Zambia set up their own ‘church’ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Teenagers from the Diocese of Lusaka discuss how to make church more relevant to them and their peers. Photo: CPCA[Anglican Communion News Service] Disillusioned teenagers in the Zambian Diocese of Lusaka have decided to run their own church services after feeling disconnected from adult-led ones.According to the Rev. Robert Sihubwa who oversees the national church’s youth ministry, the teens said neither the sermons, hymns, nor the leadership were connecting with them.Sihubwa explained, “One girl said the sermons preached in church focus largely on old people. She said, ‘You always talk about family, money, problems in the world, changing the world, etc. Our concern is about dressing, music, fashion, girl and boyfriends, whether it is right to kiss or not, and school.’“According to the youths, such concerns never get addressed [in regular services], apart from general condemnation for fashions and music.”Sihubwa said that church leaders also came under fire, with one teen saying, “The bishop’s visitation to parishes only connects with the teenagers during the confirmation service. It is rare that bishops will make a specific visit to teenagers in a parish; it is as if we don’t exist.”The comments were made at the diocese’s first ever camp for teenagers, which was an initiative that had come from the young people themselves.“The camp was full of life, singing, jokes and dancing into the night, with most of the young people being forced to [go to] sleep,” said Sihubwa. “Their energy was amazing as they woke up early in the morning at 0600 hrs for devotions and to learn how to have Morning Prayer.”The program was largely directed by teenagers, taking the roles of worship leaders, ushers, intercessors, sports coordinators, catering helpers, and some even acted as counselors to their friends.The call for greater recognition for teenagers in church life came out of group discussions where youngsters were invited to say how they believed church could be improved.“After the discussion, a consensus was reached that we start Teen Fellowships that would meet on Saturdays or during the week to address the issues raised,” said Sihubwa. “When we returned [home], the teenagers in my parish asked to start a Teen Church, at least once a month, parallel to the main service.”Despite the frustration, Lusaka diocese is one of those in the Anglican Province of Central Africa that does have youth strategies as part of it future plans. One example of how that strategy is having an impact is the establishment of the first ever Youth and Children’s Council, set up by provincial youth following their Youth and Children’s Council meeting.[Editor’s note: This story is from material in the latest edition of Witness6.7, the newsletter of the Anglican Communion’s Anglican Witness – Evangelism and Church Growth Initiative. To read it visit http://aco.org/ministry/mission/ecgi/newsletters/index.cfm] Africa, Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Youth & Young Adults This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA By ACNS staffPosted Jun 26, 2013 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Reclaiming climate change as a moral issue

by ,

first_img March 30, 2015 at 4:36 pm God blessed us with a beautiful, bountiful Earth and charged us to nurture and protect it.Is spreading this message not a crucial part of the church’s mission ? March 31, 2015 at 2:45 pm I wonder when we take on the more difficult task of urging volcanoes not to erupt, halting the break down of dead vegetation and all of the other natural sources of CO2 and methane. That way we could deal with the major sources of these and other gases instead of buying into the fable of anthropocentric climate change. Maybe after we have convince them to change their ways we could turn our attention toward the minor producers of CO2, human beings. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] When California Bishop Marc Andrus wants to engage people in a conversation about climate change he doesn’t throw statistics at them, rather he begins with a question like: When was the last time you had an experience of wonder in the natural world?“If we can connect people back to it, or open them up for a fresh experience with wonder, it’s a great starting place for recovering a sense of why [climate change] is a moral issue,” said Andrus, during an interview with Episcopal News Service in Los Angeles, California.Andrus made the trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles to speak on a panel about reclaiming climate change as a moral issue. The panel was one of two that took place during a March 24 forum – hosted by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society and Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno – aimed at addressing the global climate change crisis.A longtime environmental advocate, Andrus taught the first course on ecology and Christianity in 2013 at Virginia Theological Seminary and has long been engaged on the issue of climate change.A few years back, he said, people involved in the movement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to curb global warming took a critical look at themselves, coming to the realization that the movement’s messaging was “so thoroughly negative” that it worked against it.“People are frightened enough in their lives, they don’t want to be more frightened … it doesn’t enroll them into the effort,” said Andrus. “We actually know that fear is only a short-term motivator – as soon as you’re not quite afraid your effort slackens. If you ask what would be the opposite, love is a much stronger motivator over a period of time.“So if we can help people understand how wonder is an experience of love, if we can remember when I fell in love with the earth … or if we can help people have an experience of love, and wonder, then you have people that will stick with the effort.”The March 24, live-webcast in Los Angeles kicked off 30 Days of Action, an interactive campaign designed by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society that includes advocacy days, bulletin inserts, stories, sermons and activities to engage individuals and congregations around climate change. The campaign culminates on Earth Day, April 22.Mary Nichols, who chairs the Air Resources Board of the California Environmental Protection Agency, and a member of Los Angeles’ St. James in the City Episcopal Church, spoke on the panel alongside Andrus.“Climate change is a moral issue because as we understand it, human beings are the principal cause for the exaggerated effects of global warming that we are seeing on this planet, and therefore it is incumbent on us to take responsibility for that and to take action,” said Nichols.Climate change is the gradual change in global temperature caused by accumulation of greenhouse gases that trap heat in the atmosphere, altering the earth’s temperature. Some areas are getting warmer, as others are getting colder. For example, the mainland United States experienced the coldest winter on record since formal record keeping began in the late 1800s, whereas Alaska experienced an unseasonably warm winter.Carbon dioxide is the primary greenhouse gas emitted by human beings through the combustion of fossil fuels – coal, oil and natural gas. Industrial processes, including factory farms, transportation and electricity make up the largest human sources of carbon dioxide.Moreover, the population of the world has doubled since 1970, going from about 3.6 billion to today’s 7 billion people.“The human population explosion of recent millennia, accompanied by exploitation of fossil fuels in recent centuries, have moved this planetary system out of dynamic equilibrium. Human appetites are responsible for the collapse of that equilibrium particularly in developed nations, and many species are threatened with diminishment and loss of life,” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in her keynote address at the start of the March 24 forum in Los Angeles. “We are making war on the integrity of this planet. The result is wholesale death as species become extinct at unprecedented rates, and human beings die from disease, starvation, and the violence of war unleashed by environmental chaos and greed.”The church’s forum was timely, said Nichols, as it begins a needed conversation about climate change as nations prepare for the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Nov. 30 – Dec. 11, in Paris, France.The goal of the Paris conference is to forge an international agreement aimed at transitioning the world toward resilient, low-carbon societies and economies. If accomplished, it would be the first-ever binding, international treaty in 20 years of United Nations climate talks, and would affect developed and developing countries.“We’re already hearing the drumbeat in Congress that it can’t be done, it won’t work, if we do it the Chinese won’t and therefore they’ll eat our lunch economically … and that’s why this discussion is so timely because hopefully it gives us a chance to gather together and push back against those arguments,” said Nichols.Climate change is an increasingly politically charged, polarizing issue in the United States. The day of the forum, for instance, U.S. Senator Lindsay Graham, a moderate Republican from South Carolina who believes in climate change, blamed former Vice President Al Gore, one of the countries leading Democratic voices on climate change and a longtime supporter of initiatives to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, for inaction on climate change because Gore has turned it into a religious issue.Graham was quoted in the news media as saying, “You know, climate change is not a religious problem for me, it’s an economic, it is an environmental problem.”Members of his party, he said, “are all over the board” when it comes to climate change, and that the party doesn’t have a clear stance on climate change or a plan to address it.Graham’s remarks followed the revelation of a state of Florida ban on environmental officials from using the terms “climate change” and “global warming,” that came into effect with Gov. Rick Scott’s administration and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz’s announcement of his upcoming bid for the presidency. Cruz is a Republican from Texas who denies the existence of climate change.In December 2010, as the U.N. climate talks were underway in Cancun, Mexico, Andrus and Bishop Naudal Gomes of the Diocese of Curitiba, Brazil, convened a gathering in the Dominican Republic which explored the intersection between poverty and climate change, and aimed to change the conversation in the church from one of “climate change” to “climate justice.” The gathering included more than 30 Anglicans and Episcopalians from Cuba, the United States, Ecuador, Panama, Colombia, Haiti, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic.Addressing climate change from a global consensus doesn’t mean that developing countries arrest development, it just means that developing countries look to technology and alternatives to fossil fuels so as not to create the amount of waste developed countries have created.“We have to look at economy and equity and ecology together, and how they work to reinforce each other, and that’s not a pipe dream,” said Nichols.Throughout history, the church has partnered with social movements on equal rights and justice issues. By beginning the conversation now The Episcopal Church, which has observer status at the United Nations, can begin to talk about how to contribute to the larger conversation on climate change that will take place later this year.“For the last decade and a half, The Episcopal Church has focused on LGBT issues, and now we’re having a growing consciousness about the enormity of the climate change crisis … and without letting go of any of the other justice issues, we’re seeing that this is the emerging need for our global engagement,” said Andrus. “We are an organization that has some capacity to be a partner to a movement, to be a supporter to a movement, a resource to a movement, from which energy and resources can come.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Forrest Jones says: Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest March 30, 2015 at 12:57 pm I agree the Church has gone to worshiping the Gods of climate change. Will Odin flood the earth as his rath? I wonder if the dinosaurs had gone vegan if they would still exist? Go back to the preaching the word of God instead of the word of the left. Ralph Sibley says: Comments (13) Ron Davin says: Tags March 30, 2015 at 11:42 am Will the Church ever have the time to go back to the work of spreading the Gospel ? Reclaiming climate change as a moral issue Thye Rev. Bob Spencer says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Dirk Gently says: March 30, 2015 at 7:35 pm Very interesting. However, the mathematics, science and engineering are irrefutable. The only way to reduce mankind’s carbon footprint enough to reach a plateau in atmospheric concentration is the building of nuclear power plants to replace all power generation other than hydroelectric. The only other approach would be mass executions, which one would assume the Episcopal Church would be against.I eagerly await the follow-up from the Church urging all people to write to Congress and sign petitions demanding nuclear power. If none is forthcoming, then the Church is not serious on this issue. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Ron Davin says: April 22, 2015 at 5:51 pm Climate change has been cyclical since the world began. It has taken place since before man’s ancestors walked on two legs. While carbon emissions produced by fossil fuel extraction contribute to climate change I see no quantification of a significant contribution. Until it can be shown that reductions of fossil fuel extraction can affect the cyclical climate change I feel it would be more prudent to expend resources to minimize the effects of climate change which are strongly influenced by changes in solar radiation, plant and animal production of carbon dioxide and volcanic activity. Let us take steps to mitigate the effects rather than think we can change the world by working on one (perhaps) causative factor. Rector Belleville, IL March 30, 2015 at 2:49 pm I am very excited and heartened and glad that our church is taking this on. What I see is that people do feel overwhelmed by the bad news of the state of God’s Green Earth. When we are overwhelmed we shut down. Let us be brave and let us hear the good news of how we can improve our stewardship. I have 2 teenage sons who have both expressed their despair about the state of the planet. All I can say to them is that we can do better in ways both big and small. The small acts have ripple effects and make people feel that we can all do good. The big acts are possible if we allow them to be, if we believe in the good news. I loved that we began with a prayer. Thank you!Greta MesicsMother of Joe and Teo TomerlinSt. Paul’s Episcopal ChurchHealdsburg, CA Rector Smithfield, NC March 30, 2015 at 9:16 pm Douay-Rheims BibleAnd he said: Let us make man to our image and likeness: and let him have dominion over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and the beasts, and the whole earth, and every creeping creature that moveth upon the earth. Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Dr. Jay C. Means says: Greta Mesics says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 30, 2015 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Environment & Climate Change center_img April 1, 2015 at 7:07 pm No Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Paul E. Niedercorn says: Rector Bath, NC Mike McLane says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Comments are closed. Eddie Blue says: Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA April 1, 2015 at 10:43 am Can we expect to see a carbon tax added to our diocesan assessment? This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rev. Vicki Gray says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI April 3, 2015 at 3:12 pm I celebrate the church’s attention to climate change.My focus in the past few years has been upon developing a theology for valuing and preserving creation. What does this mean? In scripture there are many environmental references, similes, analogies, and parables. God clearly respects and values His creation and we must do the same. When we preserve, protect and value God’s creation, we recognize that creation represents the spirit-powered renewal that is available to us. When we protect and preserve and restore the environment, we restore a portion of the harmony that God intended for us at the beginnings of time. When we respect the diversity of creation, we are lead to respect the diversity in humankind. When we recognize the connectivity in nature and inter-dependence of organisms including ourselves in ecosystems, we acknowledge our connection to creation and to our Creator on a continuing spiritual basis. When we preserve the environment for our descendants, we preserve the continuity of the gift of creation for those who follow us. When we value the least of God’s creatures, we open a window in our souls to value, respect, feed, clothe, educate and pray for all nations and peoples. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Liz Olson says: March 30, 2015 at 11:11 pm Kudos to the Presiding Bishop and Bishop Marc for speaking out on and doing something about this existential question for this fragile earth, our island home. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 30, 2015 at 4:11 pm This seems to be an imperative for The Church to take on. Did God not create everything and then offer it to us to be GOOD Stewards of? Being good stewards is spreading the Gospel and honoring God’s directions to us. Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

Saints commemorations approved, but distribution in limbo

by ,

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Phillip Ayers says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET r h lewis (VTS 1963) says: July 2, 2015 at 7:57 am Appreciate the discussion on the floor of the HoD. However, it seems, based on some of the letters of Paul, that we are all called to be saints (not capital S) as part of our lives in Christ after our Baptism. SO- baptism appears to be the entry point into both the Body of Christ and the pathto growing into the likeness of Jesus. Any other start point seems an error. I am still not satisfied with having 2 Classes of s/Saints . R H Lewis (7/2) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Ruth Meyers, Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music chair, standing, addresses the Prayer Book, Liturgy and Music legislative committee, chaired by the Rev. Devon Anderson and Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith, right. Meyers served as consultant to the committee during General Convention 2015. Photo: Sharon Sheridan/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] General Convention approved making available a revised resource for calendar commemorations but stopped short of officially authorizing it as a liturgical resource for use in the next triennium. Amended Resolution A056 also establishes criteria to use when considering additions to the resource, “A Great Cloud of Witnesses: A Calendar of Commemorations,” and directs the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to review all the names within it in light of these criteria, reporting back any revisions and explanations for them to the next convention.SCLM will use those same criteria to review commemorations and their accompanying collects added to the resource via A055 and to review suggested additional commemorations outlined in A057. The latter resolution includes the names of more women for possible inclusion in response to previous General Convention directives to increase the number of women commemorated in the church calendar.“Great Cloud of Witnesses” revises and replaces a previously authorized resource, “Holy Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints.” Created as part of a major revision of “Lesser Feasts and Fasts,” the church’s commemoration of various saints and occasions not included as major holy days on the calendar of the Book of Common Prayer, “Holy Women, Holy Men” added many new commemorations and was approved for trial use by the 2009 and 2012 conventions.With the passage of the amended A056, “ ‘Lesser Feasts and Fasts’ continues to be the authorized supplemental calendar of commemorations,” said SCLM Chair the Rev. Ruth Meyers. “ ‘Great Cloud of Witnesses’ will supersede ‘Holy Women, Holy Men.’ ” It will include everyone that had been in “Holy Women, Holy Men” – including commemorations originally proposed for deletion in A055 but later restored for review under the new criteria.But how precisely the new resource will be made available remains to be determined.“The commission will need to work with the General Convention office to determine how to make (it) available,” Meyers said.An additional resource for trial use was approved via A056: “Weekday Eucharistic Propers 2015,” containing all of the seasonal collects and lessons previously contained in “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” and “Holy Women, Holy Men.”Dividing these propers from the other commemorations means creating two books of more manageable size for liturgical use and, with the “Eucharistic Propers,” creating a longer-lasting volume because the propers, unlike calendar commemorations, do not change, Meyers told ENS before the convention.“Great Cloud of Witnesses” includes “tags” for different aspects of saints’ lives that those using the resource might want to emphasize about a commemorated individual – such as martyr, pastor or bishop – and expands the Scripture options for the commemorations.The House of Bishops had approved the Prayer Book, Liturgy and Music legislative committee’s version of A056, which would have authorized “Cloud of Witnesses” for use during this triennium. But it ran into trouble in the House of Deputies, who approved the amended version that merely makes it available as a resource. Because it was amended, the resolution returned to the bishops, who concurred on July 1.Describing the resource as “the next step in the development of the church’s calendar of commemorations,” Meyers told the House of Deputies on June 29 that “in 2003 the General Convention directed the SCLM to undertake a revision of ‘Lesser Feasts and Fasts’ to reflect our increasing awareness of the importance of the ministry of all people of God and the cultural diversity of The Episcopal Church and the wider Anglican Communion and its ecumenical partners.”After receiving feedback from across The Episcopal Church on “Holy Women, Holy Men,” she said, “Great Cloud of Witnesses” was developed “as a kind of family history of persons worthy to be remembered.”Ohio Deputy the Rev. Jeremiah Williamson, a member of the legislative committee, opposed concurrence on the floor, saying adoption would establish “a set of criteria that fundamentally shifts our understanding of sainthood and baptism.”He objected to paragraph 2, criteria 2, which changed the understanding of saints as “people made holy through their mutual participation in the mystery Christ.“It defines holiness as a kind of good works; something earned rather than given us by God,” he said. “While there are certainly women and men outside the Christian church that are good people and do amazing things to better our world, they have often by their own choice not been baptized into the church. Therefore, it seems inappropriate to place them in the church’s calendar.”Deputy Benjamin Shambaugh of Maine, chair of the legislative committee’s subcommittee on the calendar, said, “There are a variety of interpretations of sainthood.“ ‘Cloud of Witnesses’ is the next evolutionary stage of ‘Lesser Feasts and Fasts’ and ‘Holy Women, Holy Men.’ It is a catechetical as well as a liturgical resource. It does, as pointed out, include criteria for inclusion against which all of those names will be judged and then those revisions will be brought to the next convention’s suggestions for revision.”Deputy Melody Shobe of Rhode Island introduced the amendment, replacing the words “authorize in the next triennium” with “make available for publication and distribution by individuals and in congregations and in other church groups for devotional or catechetical use or use in public worship subject to the provisions for optional commemorations of page 18 of the Book of Common Prayer.”She noted that The Episcopal Church is not of one mind about saints. “There are some who yearn to retain a core calendar and others who want to widen it. This helps us to balance that in a middle way,” she said.Deputy Dante Tavalaro, also of Rhode Island, supported the amendment, saying that it spoke to the Episcopal ethos of “both-and” as opposed to “either-or.”The amendment passed 571-244, and the amended resolution was approved 619-194.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. The Rev. Pat McCaughan, also an ENS correspondent, contributed to this report. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 July 11, 2015 at 8:33 am Since the title is “Great Cloud of Witnesses” isn’t the focus to be on who people are witnessing for? Baptism focuses life around “in the Name of Jesus Christ.” Otherwise we are a good group of people. Where’s the emphasis on our Christianity? Joe Parrish says: General Convention, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 January 4, 2017 at 10:12 am From the early days of the Christian church, people whose witness to Christ has been notable, especially those who have witnessed by accepting martyrdom, have been celebrated and commemorated, both locally and more broadly. To say that someone cannot be honored in this way because the word “saint” (Greek “hagios”) is also used in the New Testament for all believers, seems silly to me. Must the lives of those whose walk with God and witness have been exemplary be hidden from us?I would like to know why the entire book, “A Great Cloud of Witnesses,” is not available as a FREE download in PDF. Is keeping Church Publishing in the black sufficient reason to deny the text to those who cannot afford the $45 list price? Saints commemorations approved, but distribution in limbo Chris Harwood says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 July 4, 2015 at 11:41 pm Unfortunately, the two articles – important to me – were unreadable. Some sort of “interference” blocked the text with stamp-like images! Sorry – can we get it some other way? By Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 1, 2015 Liturgy & Music Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 7, 2015 at 11:49 pm Did they remove the non-Christians that were included in HWHM or not? Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Richard Biega says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img General Convention 2015, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Damon Hickey says: January 4, 2017 at 10:14 am Sorry, the $75 list price! Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (8) July 5, 2015 at 4:52 pm R H Lewis, does this mean you are not comfortable with commemoration of Saints at all? Just wondering! Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Damon Hickey says: July 9, 2016 at 6:09 pm Debating who is a saint seems a bit contrary to our Episcopal roots which emphasize the sainthood of all Christians. However, if we can have a fuller Eucharistic lectionary for weekday readings that supplements the Sunday Eucharistic lectionary, that seems a worthy goal. And highlighting achievements of holy people is also a good direction. Tod Roulette says: Press Release Service Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

El Consejo Ejecutivo comienza a edificar la infraestructura para nuevas…

by ,

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 2, 2016 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, en el momento de la fracción del pan durante la eucaristía del Consejo Ejecutivo el 28 de febrero en el Centro de Capacitación y Conferencias de American Airlines en Fort Worth, Texas. El Rdo. Brandon Mauai, diácono de Dakota del Norte y ex miembro del Consejo, ayuda en el oficio. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Fort Worth, Texas] El Consejo Ejecutivo quedó impuesto, en su reunión del 26 al 28 de febrero, que la forma, el alcance y la estructura de la promesa de la Iglesia Episcopal de abordar el racismo y la práctica de la reconciliación y de convertirse en una Iglesia de evangelizadores ha comenzado a materializarse. Y el Consejo ya ha puesto en su sitio algunas piezas de esa importante obra.Al hacer esto, el Consejo comenzó por implementar el llamado a la acción que resonó en la Convención General el verano pasado. Durante la reunión, los miembros del Consejo “se concentraron fundamentalmente en complementar la manera en que nosotros como comunidad denominacional emprenderemos la obra de la evangelización y la reconciliación racial”, dijo el obispo primado Michael Curry durante una conferencia de prensa luego de terminada la reunión, añadiendo que el Consejo abrazó jubilosamente esa tarea.En julio pasado, la Convención General adoptó el presupuesto trienal 2016-2018 que incluía $3 millones para comenzar nuevas congregaciones con énfasis en ayudar a las poblaciones, entre ellas a las comunidades hispanas; $2,8 millones para la obra de evangelización y una nueva e importante iniciativa de $2 millones para la justicia y reconciliación raciales.“La Iglesia Episcopal, reunida en una comunidad de gobierno, fue llevada a considerar y a abrazar una forma diferente de vocación en la vida de la Iglesia Episcopal, y eso es lo que estamos haciendo”, dijo la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados y vicepresidente del Consejo, refiriéndose a las decisiones de la Convención General durante sus palabras de clausura. Ahora el Consejo está “trabajando arduamente para ofrecerle una infraestructura” a la decisión de la Convención de que la Iglesia Episcopal tiene “una vocación a la evangelización, la reconciliación y la plantación de iglesias”.El Consejo, dijo ella, está contemplando “la manera en que viviremos como Iglesia esta nueva manifestación de una vocación corporativa”.Resultó claro durante el curso de la reunión que si bien los empeños en pro de la justicia y la reconciliación raciales y la evangelización podrían constituir renglones separados en el presupuesto trienal, están todos estrechamente unidos cuando se trata de llegar a un “mundo que clama por las buenas nuevas de un Dios que se dedica a amar y bendecir y restaurar a las personas y los sistemas quebrantados del mundo”, como la Rda. Canóniga Stephanie Spellers lo describió en su sermón del 28 de febrero durante la eucaristía del Consejo.Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización y la reconciliación racial, bosquejó los planes emergentes que incluyen una “cumbre de la evangelización”, que sería el primer paso en la creación de una red de evangelizadores a través de la Iglesia. Se han planeado iniciativas en evangelización digital, entre ellas el hallar “modos de crear vínculos significativos con personas en la Internet y ser receptivos a sus profundos anhelos e interrogantes” y el adiestrar a los episcopales a utilizar las redes sociales para la evangelización. Los planes contemplan una experimentación con resurgimientos episcopales que, en parte, “adiestrarían a equipos locales para practicar la evangelización relacional y la atenta escucha con sus vecinos, compañeros de escuela, amigos y compañeros de trabajo”, dijo ella.Antes de volver a sesionar después del almuerzo del 28 de febrero, los miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo grabaron un vídeo de la felicitación de cumpleaños de Victoria Logue, miembro del Consejo y esposa del Rdo. Frank Logue. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSEl Consejo también quedó impuesto de que Curry, Jennings, los vicepresidentes de la Cámara de Obispos y de la Cámara de Diputados, varios miembros del personal y otros líderes de la Iglesia, se habían reunido anteriormente este mes para comenzar a crear un plan para la reconciliación racial que se arraigará en escuchar. “Toda una Iglesia dedicada a decir la verdad y a compartir historias, escuchando a diversos vecinos y participando en la transformación mutua” es como lo describió Spellers.Y el Consejo ayudó a poner en marcha planes para expandir los empeños de la Iglesia en la plantación de iglesias y el desarrollo de nuevos medios de edificar y formar comunidades de fe.El Consejo aprobó un presupuesto para 2016 que incluyó asignaciones para muchas de las nuevas iniciativas. Ese presupuesto debe aparecer pronto aquí.“Abarcamos una sorprendente cantidad de terreno y quedamos informados [de la existencia] de la amplia variedad de ministerios que tenemos ante nosotros”, dijo la Rda. Susan Snook, presidenta del comité sobre misión y ministerio locales, durante su informe al pleno el 28 de febrero. “Es un buen momento de ser episcopal y es un buen momento para ser parte del Movimiento de Jesús”.Episcopal News Service se propone una cobertura adicional de los detalles que surjan de estos empeños en los próximos días.En otras decisiones, el Consejo:Eligió a sus representantes ante la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América (IELA) y ante la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá. Steven Nishibayashi de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles será el representante del Consejo ante el Consejo de la Iglesia de la IELA. Noreen Duncan, de la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey, representará al Consejo ante el Consejo del Sínodo General de la Iglesia [Anglicana] del Canadá. En la actualidad, el Rdo. Stephen Herr, pastor de la iglesia evangélica luterana de Cristo [Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church] en Gettysburg, Pensilvania, es el enlace de la IELA ante el Consejo Ejecutivo, y el Muy Rdo. Peter Wall, deán de la iglesia catedral de Cristo [Christ’s Church Cathedral] en Hamilton, Ontario, representa a la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab El Consejo Ejecutivo comienza a edificar la infraestructura para nuevas iniciativas La justicia racial, la reconciliación y la evangelización captan la imaginación de los miembros Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Executive Council Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo (en el sentido de las manecillas del reloj desde el centro detrás), el obispo primado Michael B. Curry, Julia Harris Ayala, Thomas Alexander, George Wing y el director ejecutivo de la Convención General, Rdo. Canónigo Michael Barlowe usan sus aparatos electrónicos para encontrar y cantar un himno durante la eucaristía al comienzo de la sesión plenaria del 28 de febrero. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Convino en una propuesta de la Diócesis de Texas —que se presentó a través del Comité Permanente Conjunto de Planificación y Disposiciones de la Iglesia— de intentar recaudar $100.000 para pagar por un mayor espacio para la celebración de un oficio eucarístico especial durante la reunión de la Convención General en Austin, Texas, en 2018. El presupuesto denominacional ya ofrece un espacio de culto de 3.000 asientos expandible a 5.000 en el Centro de Convenciones de Austin. Sin embargo, al Consejo le dijeron que la diócesis percibe una mayor oportunidad de evangelización si celebra la eucaristía en el Centro Palmer, aproximadamente a una milla de distancia. Jennings, miembro del comité de planificación y disposiciones, dijo que la diócesis espera que entre 5.000 y 6.000 miembros de la diócesis asistan a la eucaristía. Ese número se sumaría al gran número de asistentes a la Convención que normalmente participa de la eucaristía diaria. “Resultaba muy claro que el presupuesto no podría estirarse para darle cabida a esto y las personas de esa diócesis están dispuestas a buscar los fondos para pagar por eso”, dijo ella. El Rdo. Stan Runnels, miembro del Consejo de la Diócesis de Misurí Occidental, fue el único que votó en contra de la autorización. Él le dijo al Consejo, antes de la votación a viva voz, que convenir en recaudar este dinero era “echarle gasolina al fuego” que arde en algunas partes de la Iglesia respecto a si la Convención General debe reunirse en una diócesis que no pague la totalidad de su solicitud al presupuesto denominacional. La Iglesia Episcopal le pide actualmente a las diócesis que contribuyan al presupuesto denominacional con el 18 por ciento de sus ingresos anuales. Esto se reducirá a 16,5 por ciento para el presupuesto de 2017 y al 15 por ciento en 2018. La contribución [diocesana] de cada año en el presupuesto trienal se basa en el ingreso de la diócesis de dos años antes, menos $150.000. Jennings le dijo al Consejo que la Diócesis de Texas contribuye actualmente con un 13,3 por ciento de sus ingresos. En 2013, había prometido contribuir con el 6,7 por ciento ($463,959 de $7.094.500 su ingreso elegible entonces). La fecha tope para reservar el Centro Palmer es el 25 de marzo, según la resolución aprobada por el Consejo, y los compromisos firmados exigen que el monto total debe recibirse antes de firmar el contrato.Un resumen de las resoluciones aprobadas por el Consejo durante la reunión se encuentra aquí.La cobertura previa hecha por ENS de la reunión de Fort Worth puede verse aquí.El Consejo se vuelve a reunir del 8 al 10 de junio en el Hotel y Centro de Conferencias Oak Ridge en Chaska, Minnesota, al suroeste de Minneapolis.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, más el Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio]. Además, el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, el Secretario, el Director de Operaciones, el Tesorero y el Director de Finanzas tienen asiento y voz, pero no voto. Canon I.4(1).– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Re-hospitalised Archbishop Desmond Tutu thanks well-wishers

by ,

first_img Rector Bath, NC Re-hospitalised Archbishop Desmond Tutu thanks well-wishers Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags By Gavin DrakePosted Sep 19, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Africa, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR September 20, 2016 at 12:31 pm Beyond having the very best giggle on the planet; one that induces a smile in every heart, Desmond Tutu is a bright shining symbolic figure for LOVE and compassion. Honored to have met him, at the Forum 2000, I will always cherish his love, leadership, and humanity. Millions of people around the globe have benefited by his guiding light. A light too bright to be taken from us too soon. WE LOVE YOU, Desmond. Get well soon.One Love!, always..Wendie Busig-Kohn Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Servicecenter_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Communion Wendie Busig-Kohn says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu has turned to social media to thank well-wishers after he was once-again hospitalized. Tutu was discharged from hospital on Sept. 14 after a three-week stay, which included surgery to treat a series of recurring infections. On Sept. 17 he was re-admitted as a precaution after signs of infection around the surgical wound.This afternoon (Sept. 19), Tutu tweeted: “Thank you all you tweeters and facebookers for the love and prayers for my good health. Love is the best medicine. God bless you all!”The 84-year-old was a key figure in the fight against Apartheid – a role he continued in post-Apartheid South Africa as chair of the country’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In 1984 his work was recognized by the award of the Nobel Peace Prize. Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more