Category Archives: hcoon

Legal action planned for concussion neglect as former pros take on Rugby authorities

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first_imgTuesday Dec 8, 2020 Legal action planned for concussion neglect as former pros take on Rugby authorities A group of former internationals are planning legal action for negligence against the rugby authorities over brain injuries they have suffered, the law firm leading the action has announced.ADVERTISEMENTSteve Thompson, who cannot remember being part of England’s 2003 World Cup triumph, is part of a ‘test group’ for a potentially much larger action along with another former England player, Michael Lipman, and ex-Wales international Alix Popham, according to Rylands Law.The planned action is against World Rugby, the Rugby Football Union and the Welsh Rugby Union, for “failure to protect (the claimants) from the risks caused by concussions”.The players have also created 15 ‘commandments’ which they feel World Rugby should adopt to make the game safer.Thompson, Lipman and Popham are part of a test group of eight players, but Richard Boardman from Rylands Law says he is representing more than 100 players whose ages range from their 20s to their 50s, many of whom are showing symptoms of neurological problems.“The vast majority of the former players we represent love the game and don’t want to see it harmed in any way,” Boardman said.“They just want to make it safer so current and future generations don’t end up like them. This is why we’re asking World Rugby to make a number of immediate, relatively low-cost changes. The obvious first step is for World Rugby, RFU and WRU to stop being in denial and acknowledge that there is a problem.”ADVERTISEMENTSTEVE THOMPSON – ENGLANDThompson, 42, was diagnosed with early onset dementia and probable CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) in November.“I have no recollection of winning the World Cup in 2003 or of being in Australia for the tournament,” he said.“Knowing what I know now, I wish that I had never turned professional. I went from working on a building site and training twice a week to training every day, sometimes twice a day.ADVERTISEMENT“Many of those training sessions were contact sessions using a scrummage machine and I would be in the thick of things, with all the pressure pushed on me. It was not uncommon for me to be left dazed, seeing white spots and not knowing where I was for a few seconds, sometimes I would pass out completely.“It was just an accepted part and parcel of training. I really wished that I had ended my career earlier, maybe my diagnosis might not be so bleak.”ALIX POPHAM – WALESPopham, 41, was diagnosed with traumatic brain injury, early onset dementia and probable CTE in April.He said the diagnosis turned his world upside down.“We had an answer as to why I was struggling so much, but my future looked so bleak. Mel and I only married last year, we were hoping to have another child too, but that’s just not going to be possible now,” Popham said.“We can’t do that knowing my diagnosis and what this means.”MICHAEL LIPMAN – ENGLANDLipman, 40, was diagnosed with early onset dementia and probable CTE three weeks ago.“This is something I will be battling forever and ultimately I won’t win,” he said.“I am a walking time bomb. I feel like I am treading on eggshells with myself.”Boardman, who has instructed Susan Conway QC of 39 Essex Chambers in relation to the planned action, added: “We know that senior figures in the game have been discussing the issue of head injuries since at least 1975.“Yet, inexplicably, the game’s approach to concussion seems to have become less progressive in the professional era, as evidenced by the three-week mandatory break following a concussion being reduced to just six days in 2011.“Whilst health and safety has moved in the wrong direction, the professional game has become a game with increasing collisions as players get heavier, stronger and faster.”The 15 commandments to make the game safer include an acknowledgement from World Rugby that playing the game can lead to CTE and other neurodegenerative diseases, the abolition of zero-hour contracts which compel players to play when injured in order to get paid, a limit to the number of contact sessions permitted in training, better sideline testing and more considerate use of substitutions.The announcement cited the example of the ‘bomb squad’ scenario in the 2019 World Cup final where six 18-stone South Africans came off the bench in the second half.The group are also calling for a central database to record head injuries, better aftercare for retired players and the removal of the reliance on MRI scans to rule out brain trauma. Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life Reports10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Red Box House / The Grid Architects

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first_img Landscape: Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Saint-Gobain, Tata Steel, Aluminium, Asian Paints, Trimble Navigation, Ultratech Projects 2019 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/929582/red-box-house-the-grid-architects Clipboard Lead Architects: The Grid Architects Red Box House / The Grid Architects “COPY” Year:  ArchDaily Area:  4259 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Architects: The Grid Architects Area Area of this architecture project Houses Photographs Save this picture!© Photographix+ 24Curated by Paula Pintos Share Red Box House / The Grid ArchitectsSave this projectSaveRed Box House / The Grid Architects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/929582/red-box-house-the-grid-architects Clipboard CopyAbout this officeThe Grid ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesAhmedabadOn FacebookIndiaPublished on December 05, 2019Cite: “Red Box House / The Grid Architects” 05 Dec 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisPatinated Copper: Nordic Green/Blue/Turquoise/SpecialMetal PanelsDri-DesignMetal Panels – CopperIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsExterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsPure + FreeFormCustom Metal Cladding – Legacy Fund 1 BuildingWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodWood Fiber Partition Walls – ValchromatDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaSkylightsFAKROEnergy-efficient roof window FTT ThermoToilets / BidetsBritexToilets – Accessible Centurion PanMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?‘红盒子’之家 / The Grid Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream India Snehal Suthar & Bhadri Suthar Vishvajit Hada Design Team:Snehal Suthar, Bhadri Suthar, Vishvajit Hada, Aanal ShahEngineering:inhouseÁrea:3616 ft2City:AhmedabadCountry:IndiaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© PhotographixRecommended ProductsDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE LuceDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20WoodEGGERLaminatesDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame ArcText description provided by the architects. This project was driven by contrasts and contrarian requirements, a strive towards minimising the shortcomings, using them to create positives. A programme that would be introverted and inclusive at once. In fact, the architects harboured an upbeat, buoyant attitude towards the assignment right from the outset.Save this picture!© PhotographixThe context was a densely populated area, a hodge-podge of built-forms that are typical of so many middle-class Indian communities. The plot itself was small, a mere 3600 sq ft approximately. The intent then became to create a visual statement that would hold its own ground amongst the urban fabric. But this statement had to be a bold presence and not a chest-thumping proclamation. Moreover, while the space had to enjoy appreciable connections to the outside, privacy could not be sacrificed.Save this picture!© PhotographixThe responses to these contrarian requirements was formalised as a simple, clean-lined structure, with a solid red textured facade, tempered with expanses of sandstone. The protrusion of the facades from the wall plane is an important detail that reveals the functional feature of the elements, their tectonic difference and relationship to each other. The structure was encircled by a compound wall, largely low — but whose height increased proportionately with the demands for privacy. Since the compact plot size did not permit an extensive landscape with sit-outs, etc, the leisure spaces were positioned on the top terrace, and the mandatory setbacks were tastefully greened.Save this picture!Ground Floor PlanThe verdant encirclement also includes existing mature trees which were taken into account while planning and construction. Within this belt, the architects also positioned three sit-outs, sheltering under horizontal brise soleil. These semi-open pergola spaces create the dramatic play of shadow and light that is so vital to a dynamic spatial experience, besides providing the occupants with a refuge from the afternoon sun. These partial coverings also achieve the balance between privacy and openness by granting moderate visual accessibility to the users while keeping the living space from being too exposed.Save this picture!© PhotographixThe internal programme of the small house treats the experience of airiness and the ‘feel of space’ as sacrosanct. The planning reduced passages, and favoured a more open-plan typology. Elements such as walls, window frames, pergolas, balconies and openings at corners of dense concrete walls and large tree pots have been choreographed into a layered sequence of diverse yet hierarchal spaces that offer varying levels of privacy.Save this picture!© PhotographixSave this picture!SectionsSave this picture!© PhotographixThe connections to the outside are constant, in the form of small and large openings, semi-open decks and sheltered balconies. The ground floor is the social volume that accommodates the living/dining room and a semi-integrated kitchens, in addition to a bedroom. The first level is devoted to two master bedrooms (one for the couple and the other for their children), while the last one (the terrace) houses the leisure areas — a gym, a home theatre, and a lounging space beneath a pergola.  Save this picture!© PhotographixThe Red Box House, as the project is called, is designed to satisfy an urban lifestyle that regards nature as a precious, inextricable part of living. It triumphs over limitations of site and context to deliver a habitat that reminds us of the power of new advances to change our built environment. Save this picture!© PhotographixProject gallerySee allShow lessSpotlight: Ricardo BofillArchitecture NewsLes Abouts / Atelier Pierre ThibaultSelected Projects Share “COPY” CopyHouses•Ahmedabad, India Photographs:  Photographix Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project last_img read more

International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: journalist summoned to give evidence before the ICTY appeals against the judges’ decision

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first_imgNews RSF_en December 2, 2020 Find out more Organisation NetherlandsEurope – Central Asia The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) decided on 7 June 2002 to subpoena former Washington Post journalist Jonathan Randal to testify before the court concerning an interview he had conducted in 1993 with a former Bosnian Serb leader. The journalist had previously refused to comply with the summons issued by the Tribunal’s Chamber dealing with the trial of the Bosnian Serb leaders Momir Talic and Radoslav Brdjanin.The ICTY’s Appeals Chamber will examine Jonathan Randal’s appeal on 3 October 2002.Reporters Without Borders, together with 34 media and press freedom organisations, submitted an amici curiae brief in support of Mr Randal’s appeal. Reporters Without Borders also wrote a letter of protest to the Tribunal’s Chief Prosecutor, Carla Del Ponte, on 12 June 2002. “If journalists working in war zones are now to be seen as aides to international courts, the already very dangerous job of war correspondent will soon become impossible,” stated Robert Ménard, Secretary-General of the organisation. “Reporters give evidence about world events, but in real time and for the benefit of international public opinion,” he added. News Help by sharing this information News Receive email alerts October 2, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: journalist summoned to give evidence before the ICTY appeals against the judges’ decision RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive In a letter dated 18 July 2002, Mrs Del Ponte replied that the right of journalists not to reveal their sources, which would justify granting journalists exemption from having to give evidence in court, did not apply in the Randal case. The Chief Prosecutor went on to say that Mr Randal had already agreed to be interviewed by investigators and that the summons to appear on 29 January 2002 was intended only to “confirm the authenticity and exactness of the statements and comments gathered from the accused Brdjanin and published in an article which appeared at the time of the conflict in the former Yugoslavia.” According to Mrs Del Ponte, “appearing before the court at this time in no way meant that Mr Randal would have to reveal any secret or confidential information he had received in relation to this same article.”This response failed to satisfy Reporters Without Borders, however. “We have always supported the establishment of an international justice, but even the best causes do not justify the violation of the fundamental principle of protection of journalists’ sources,” stated Robert Ménard on the eve of Mr Randal’s appeal. to go further Follow the news on Netherlands November 23, 2020 Find out more Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU NetherlandsEurope – Central Asia News June 2, 2021 Find out more Ten RSF recommendations for the European Unionlast_img read more

PBAF announces online scholarship application platform

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first_img WhatsApp Twitter Facebook WhatsApp PBAF announces online scholarship application platform Pinterest Pinterest Twitter Facebook By admin – February 17, 2018 Permian Basin Area FoundationPermian Basin Area Foundation recently announced its renewed partnership with AcademicWorks, an online scholarship application platform, for the upcoming 2018-2019 academic year.Students and counselors can view eligibility, selection criteria and apply for scholarships online at the foundation’s website, www.pbaf.org.In 2017, Permian Basin Area Foundation awarded $551,000 in scholarships from its more than 80 scholarship funds. The Foundation anticipates awarding approximately half a million dollars for the 2018-2019 academic year.“This year, the foundation will accept only applications submitted through the AcademicWorks system,” explained Sherri Heiting, scholarship administrator. “This scholarship management information system provides an efficient and secure platform through which students can apply for dozens of foundation scholarships. All students are required to create an AcademicWorks user account prior to accessing the General Scholarship Application.”Unless otherwise specified, the completed electronic scholarship application must be received by Permian Basin Area Foundation no later than March 31. Likewise, supporting documents and Reference Evaluation Forms are due by the March 31 deadline.To learn more about scholarships, grants, and the philanthropic work of donors partnering with PBAF, call 432-617-3213. Local News Previous articleMCHS music ministry brings patients joyNext articleELDER: Take the ‘racist xenophobe’ quiz: Who said this about illegal immigration? adminlast_img read more

Student Soapbox

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first_imgSo what are you doing this summer? A rickshaw run across Mongolia? Spraying Moet over sun-kissed buttocks in Monaco? Ridding yourself of sins by meditating in a mountain-hidden Nepalese monastery? Possibly, but for most of Oxford’s little dynamos, the curricula vitae are being beefed up with three to ten week corporate whore internships. Whether you’re banking, journo-ing, law-ing, advertising, politicking or accounting, the Fleet Street Mafia and Canary Wharf Glitterati have well and truly contract-bound us.Great, we all think. We get the dosh, the brownie career points, and the persistent cold from seventeen air-conditioned hours every day; they (the Goldman Sachs, News Internationals, Saatchis and PwCs) get your blood, sweat, tears and twenty-one years’ worth of well-crafted brain for summer (and, they hope, for life). But is that it? Are we simply going to build up CV points, work our ways up the ladder and then retire happily ever after? I’d say three quarters of Oxford’s population are actively socially conscious. More of us than ever are creating sophisticated networks dedicated to social good, preparing for Masters and PhDs in social policy and human rights law and are actively pursuing careers in social enterprises (for-profit businesses whose main aims are for socially benefiting causes). A prime example of Oxford Social Enterprise is Batiq – where Oxford students get paid to mentor Korean children over internet webcams to encourage cultural exchange and English language usage. Then there’s AIESEC, which co-ordinates community-building work experiences in different countries. Last term the Idea Idol competition held by the Oxford Entrepreneurs gave first prize to a group which assisted the blind with a revolutionary sensory glove and stick. And let’s not forget the whole plethora of fundraising activities which are taking place across Oxford to raise awareness and funds, from the Hands up for Darfur Ball to the RED fashion show. Plans are also underway to build the “Oxford Hub”, a centre for all charities and NGOs to meet, share knowledge and expertise. Oxford is certainly moving in leaps and bounds, all in the spirit of “the golden age of philanthropy.”Don’t get me wrong – I think it’s great to go into the corporate world – a world whose vitality revolves around its aims of efficiency and waste-cutting. Indeed, what better opportunity is there to practise these ideas?  But after embellishing our skills portfolio in the City, perhaps we should give something back by sharing our expertise with charities.Smruti SriramSmruti Sriram is Treasurer of the Oxford Union.last_img read more

Genius makes Spanish debut

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first_imgGenius has announced that its white and brown gluten-free loaves will be on the supermarket shelves of retail chain Carrefour, in Spain, from the end of March.The gluten-free bakery brand said it will become “a key supplier to Carrefour”, as part of the supermarket’s plans to revamp its gluten-free offerings in-store.The products will be available in 350 stores across Spain, with the brand also available in the Republic of Ireland, the USA and Canada.Genius said it was also looking to increase its distribution overseas.Last month, the firm announced that all three of its sliced breads – white, brown and multi-seeded – were now available from online grocery retailer Ocado.>>Gluten-free brands outstrip own-label items>>Tesco listing for Genius as it moves into pieslast_img read more

See Anderson .Paak Electrify The Masses At Suwannee Hulaween [Videos]

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first_imgAnderson .Paak‘s rise to the national spotlight has been incredibly fast, but the road he walked to prepare himself for this moment was long and dark indeed. From heartbreaking family struggles to sold out performances at festivals like Suwannee Hulaween, appearances on tracks with Jay-Z and chart hits Paak has survived it all. Amazingly, Paak and his band The Free Nationals have used the strength built from that adversity to share a message of hope, inclusiveness and joy, packaged with a sexy swagger and a funky beat.Paak has spent time behind the drum kit, as he often does at live shows including the high energy set during the recent Halloween themed event at The Spirit Of the Suwannee Music Park. After setting the tone by coming out to a piped in tape of Guns n’ Roses “Welcome To The Jungle” the band launched straight into his most recent hit, “Come Down.” The crowd went into a frenzy, waving arms and getting down as one to the rock steady beats and sparking flow of Paak. Leaving the crowd no chance to catch their breath he then reeled off wild renditions of “Milk n’ Honey” and “Drugs,” each driving the audience further and further into the red zone of party madness.Easily one of the best received performances of the entire weekend, by the end of their allotted time they left to a chorus of pleas for more from a thoroughly excited crowd. Our own videographer Rex Thomson was on hand, capturing the experience as the park’s beloved Amphitheater went into a literal frenzy surrounding him.Check out the footage of the mayhem, below.“Come Down”“Milk n’ Honey”“Drugs”last_img read more

Marcus King Band Shreds “Hot ‘Lanta” At Sold Out Terminal West Performance [Audio/Gallery]

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first_imgLast weekend, rising guitar phenom Marcus King brought his soulful band to Atlanta’s Terminal West last Saturday, January 7th, for an all out celebration! King and his band worked a mixture of their rocking originals with classic covers, treating the Atlanta audience to a top notch show from cover to cover. The band even worked in a rendition of “Hot ‘Lanta” by the Allman Brothers Band for the Atlanta crowd, as well as tunes by Allen Toussaint and Blind Faith during the sold out show.Check out a full audio recording from the night, as provided by Jam Buzz.You can see the setlist, as well as a full gallery of images from EMily Butler Photography, below. Load remaining imageslast_img

Novelist Perrotta headlines LITFest

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first_imgLITFest, Harvard’s celebration of the written word, returns this weekend with readings, panels, and workshops featuring literary voices in fiction, nonfiction, oral storytelling, poetry, and television. The festival begins Friday and ends Saturday in a conversation with novelist Tom Perrotta, author of “The Leftovers,” and Nick Cuse ’13, who writes for the adapted version of the work for HBO television with Perrotta. The talk will begin at 7 p.m. in Fong Auditorium, Boylston Hall.The two authors, along with Bret Johnston, head of Harvard’s Creative Writing program, spoke with the Gazette about what goes on in a writers’ room, why writing isn’t a special-occasion activity, and what about the television show improves on the book.GAZETTE: How did you learn to write?PERROTTA: I’ve had much more of an old-school writing education. I took a lot of undergrad classes, and then got my M.F.A. at Syracuse in the mid-1980s with Tobias Wolff. I came out expecting to be a fiction writer full time, which I did for a number of years. I also taught creative writing at Yale and at Harvard Extension School for a number of years. My challenge was figuring out how to balance my life as a writer with life as teacher. About 15 years ago, I stopped teaching and switched to screenwriting, in addition to my work as a novelist.CUSE: My experience was different. I grew up making movies with my friends right when you could first get a cheap video camera and edit a movie on your computer. That was my hobby. We would conceptualize and write stuff down and film and edit all together. There was something appealing to me about going to school and studying that wasn’t directly continuing from that. I studied English, which was reading and analytical, but I also took fiction with Bret Johnston. A lot had been in my mind, telling stories through little videos that I had never thought of in a more academic way. I’ve been able to apply the way we discussed prose to what I do now, which is again making videos, although they’re a little more expensive now if they’re for HBO. It came full circle.JOHNSTON: When you’re watching a show like “The Leftovers,” you feel like you’re getting as much from literature as what you get from television because these writers have a background in fiction. It converges in a way that feels like where we are in the culture at large. TV is in such a great place because it has so many sophisticated writers making it. When I think back to Nick in class, I remember how incredibly astute he was in the way he read other people’s stories and offered suggestions on how things could be fixed. Week by week, I watched him inhabiting himself as a writer more and more fully.PERROTTA: That happened at the show as well. He started as the assistant in the writers’ room. It’s an entry-level and mostly silent position. In three years, he became a very important colleague in the room and changed the course of the show in very crucial ways. I was the oldest person in the room, and Nick was the youngest. In the end, I don’t think it mattered to either of us.GAZETTE: Tom, what was it like to take your novel from the solitary experience of author to a room full of writers who would define it as a TV show?PERROTTA: When I wrote the book, I knew I wanted to turn it into a TV series. It felt like the natural place where I didn’t have to shove my novel into a feature film format. I was coming from a realistic literary tradition, and Damon Lindelof (co-creator of the TV adaptation) is a very much pop-culture guy. It was such an act of faith on both our parts to find a voice that could include all of the influences we were bringing. It wasn’t always easy to do. There were moments of frustration — that’s what collaboration is. “The Leftovers” the show is very different from the book. Yet parts of the book remain strong throughout. Nick knows there were rocky moments along the way, but all the struggles were ultimately for the benefit of the show.The writers were such a revelation to me. Everyone had to explain his/her choices in real time. We’d reach a fork in the road [where] you could go this way or that way, and then someone might come in with a third way. I would be interested in making a class out of a writers’ room. People could learn a lot over watching other writers think and argue over choices.CUSE: People tend to leave out of their imagination one aspect of what a writers’ room is like — which is the time spent laughing and joking with each other. You feel very close to these people, which allows you to share and take risks with your ideas. I didn’t think of Tom as the writer of the book, which, I think, is a huge compliment. It requires a tremendous amount of generosity to not let people think of you as author of this book. It was a level playing field, which is why it was such a successful collaboration.PERROTTA: I did feel like I had to argue for my ideas the same way everyone else did. There were times people had great ideas that made me wish I could go back to the novel. I’ll give you one example: In season one, there were these “Loved One” dolls people use to grieve. They’re very accurate computer-assisted replicas of people who disappeared. In any case, they originated as a world-building exercise where we tried to imagine all sorts of social changes caused by the “sudden departure.” The “Loved Ones” were such a cool idea that we went back to them again and again over the course of the season, and used them prominently in the finale.GAZETTE: Where do you find emotional gravitas in a story?PERROTTA: Some writers live in their private worlds, but I am somebody who does try to react in real time to current events. The book “Election” emerged from the 1992 election, and “Little Children” was inspired by a national debate about sex offenders and their place in the community. “The Leftovers” had its roots in both public and private events. I was reacting to 9/11 and the economic collapse of 2008, while also dealing with the emotional fallout from my father’s sudden death in a car accident. I also write from obsession, things I can’t stop thinking about.CUSE: I’m a little more looking outward to inward. I’m a fairly curious guy, and I read and watch a lot of stuff, looking for things that are interesting and stick in my head. If they stick in my head, then I know they are personal to me in some way. The idea of them lingering compels me to put them in a story.GAZETTE: We are only days into the Trump administration, and these seem like surreal times. How are you thinking about events in terms of your art?PERROTTA: “The Leftovers” is, in one way, a critique of apocalyptic thinking. We have been obsessed that something terrible was about to happen, that there was a collective loss — of faith, of art, of climate, of viruses, all these artistic expressions — and our future was no longer guaranteed. Everybody feels the apocalypse is on the way, but the world looks the same. I feel the world has caught up with us.CUSE: I think about the Eden collapse myth — that there was a garden where everything was perfect, and we messed it up. There’s something so attractive about that story. The good times are over, and now it’s bad times. That story has always been a successful story to tell. And its magnetic pull is particularly strong now. But any version of the future is a story because we don’t know what it is going to be yet.PERROTTA: [President] Trump was telling it from another standpoint. Let’s go back to that perfect time. We’re all looking at the same narrative but from different places on the timeline. For Trump voters, that was their paradise. It was their mythical time that allowed you to take care of your family. Any story about a glorified past has deep roots.GAZETTE: What is your advice for young writers, especially when they are struggling with writing?PERROTTA: You can see it in the different paths we took. I would encourage young writers to not get too hung up on one format over another. There are all sorts of ways to be a writer right now, so jump around. Learn to treat writing as a job. Separate it from something you do on special occasions when you feel inspired. It’s work. It’s wonderful work, but the sooner you treat it as work, the faster you’ll become a real writer.CUSE: Schedule your writing in advance. If it’s in your schedule and you follow your schedule, it solves a lot of your problems, [including] writer’s block, which maybe wasn’t really there in the first place. It helps me to ask myself, “What do I really like?” or “What book or movie am I excited about when it’s coming out?” It gets me excited to think about what makes me more productive.last_img read more

Heart Health

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first_imgFebruary has arrived. Cue the hearts, flowers and Valentine’s Day festivities. While we have love on the brain, I would like to challenge you to change your perception of love by caring for your heart. February is American Heart Month.Noncontrollable factors, like having a family history of heart disease, being of African-American descent, and growing older or postmenopausal, can contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The good news is that most chronic diseases, including CVD, are caused by modifiable behaviors. The three most common risk behaviors for CVD are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and inadequate weight management.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension encourages you to love yourself by making changes to decrease your risk for heart disease.Change your diet. Most of us do not get the appropriate number of servings of fruit and vegetables every day. A small change, like ensuring that you have a serving of fruit or vegetables at every meal, can do wonders for your heart.Fruits and vegetables are high in fiber and low in calories, which aids in weight management. Try incorporating a variety of vegetables and fruits into your diet, like kale, asparagus, blueberries and cherries. I have found that drinking fruit and vegetable smoothies also increases fruit and vegetable intake.   Spice it up. Food preparation is just as important as the food itself. Reducing the amount of sodium in foods is essential to good heart health. We may be a society of foodies, and no one likes bland food, but there are ways to make foods taste great without adding sodium.Spices and herbs add flavor without adding extra fat and calories. If you’re aiming for an Italian-inspired meal, for instance, try using garlic powder, thyme, oregano and basil. Switching from garlic and onion salts to garlic and onion powders is a small step that could bring big returns.  Make the effort. Physical activity takes effort on our part. Again, small changes can make huge differences.Walking is a cost-effective, easy way to get moving. Walk the entire grocery store, to the mailbox or to the corner.I took my own advice and began walking. I am ashamed to say that, at first, it was rather difficult. I could not walk around the block. Yikes! I kept at it and now I can walk around the block twice. I had to build up to it. I started with a small goal of walking to the end of my block. I added a pedometer app to my phone that lets me know the number of steps I take daily. It serves as a reminder to get up and get moving. My family also joined in and my children and my husband join me on my evening walks.Consider these Extension tips and make heart health a priority this Valentine’s Day.last_img read more