Category Archives: mslrf

People on the move

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first_imgMill HouseInns has announced its senior management team, including the appointment of SueNewton as HR director. Newton will work with managing director Keith Henesy,commercial director Steve Pocock and operations director Andrew Jones. Previous Article Next Article People on the moveOn 5 Dec 2000 in Personnel Today Energycompany BG Group has appointed Peter Duffy group director of HR. Duffy,vice-president of HR with Detroit-based TRW Automotive Electronics, will leadHR operations for the company’s 3,800 employees. Duffy, who has been with TRWsince 1999, has also been HR director of Lucas Varity Electrical andElectronics Systems and with British Aerospace in various senior HR positions. Oldham NHSTrust has made several personnel changes. Tom Brogan has moved from head of personnelservices to director. Julia Wright has moved from personnel manager to deputydirector of personnel services. Jayne Pritchard has moved from personnelofficer to personnel manager and Kirsty Wood has moved from assistant personnelofficer to personnel officer. Alison Brophy has been appointed personnelofficer and Catherine Cook had been appointed assistant personnel officer.There is also a new medical staffing and recruiting officer, Lindsay Welsby,reporting to Sue Tinkler, medical staffing and recruitment manager. JohnSteele, group HR director of British Telecom, has been appointed by Trade andIndustry Secretary Stephen Byers to serve on the Acas Council. He is joined bythree new council members, William Coupar, chairman of the DTI Partnership FundAssessment Panel, James Knapp, general secretary of the National Union of Rail,Maritime and Transport Workers, and Veronica McDonald, deputy general secretaryof the STUC.center_img Dr RosalindBergemann is the new vice-president of HR with Gemini, based in Cambridge. Shejoins the company, which represents Gemini Genomics, from the Thomas CookGroup, where she was head of group reward and benefits. Bergemann was alsoappointed a fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts,Manufactures and Commerce in September by the society’s president the Duke of Edinburgh. Comments are closed. ParityResources, the UK IT resourcing and recruitment division of Parity Group, hasnamed Jeff Brooks resourcing service director. Brooks, who will be responsiblefor bid management and agency management service, joins from Amdahl, where hewas responsible for developing the company’s resource centre from conception toan international turnover of £14m over three years. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Nurses demand a share of NHS Budget billions

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first_imgNurses are demanding pay rises funded by the billions of pounds the Government has earmarked for NHS modernisation.The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) hinted at strike action if some of the Budget cash was not used to increase pay.Beverly Malone, general secretary of the RCN, said she wanted to see a bumper investment in nursing and that money was needed most.Malone said last year’s pay increase was inadequate, as the 3.9 per cent hike only improved the typical nurse’s salary by around £9 per week. She said retention rather than recruitment was the key to NHS success, but money was essential to achieving improvements in both.Her calls come on top of negotiations for flexible working and contracts. The money from the Budget will raise NHS spending by £40bn in the next six years and it is anticipated that spending for this year will be £5bn up on last year.weblink www.rcn.org.uk Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Nurses demand a share of NHS Budget billionsOn 30 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Assistant Professor – Applied Mathematics BioMath

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first_imgAssistant Professor – Applied Mathematics BioMathJob Description SummaryThe Department of Applied Mathematics at Florida PolytechnicUniversity seeks candidates for an Assistant Professor with broadteaching capacity that supports an undergraduate degree inEngineering Mathematics and has a research specialization inMathematical Medicine and Biology (which may include ComputationalNeuroscience, neural imaging, brain informatics, bio-inspired datascience, brain signal generation and propagation, brain diseasemodeling, etc) at the Assistant Professor level to begin on August15, 2021.The Department of Applied Mathematics at Florida PolytechnicUniversity has embarked on a new initiative in EngineeringMathematics since August 2019. The new undergraduate programprovides the nexus of Florida Polytechnic University – wideactivities in engineering, mathematics, physics, chemistry andbiology and anticipates close collaborations between appliedmathematics faculty and faculty members in other engineering andscience departments.This position is part of a strategic expansion of the departmentthat will add approximately four faculty to the current eight fulltime faculty members within the department. As a part of thisfaculty expansion, the department will be emphasizing and improvingits current teaching mission and also putting in place a researchpresence for the department. Relatively near-term plans include aMaster’s degree program for the department.Applicants must demonstrate the ability to develop a highlysuccessful teaching and research program, participate in extramuralfunding efforts, publish the results of their research studies inleading scientific journals of their discipline, superviseundergraduate students, and to teach effectively at both thegraduate and undergraduate level courses. In addition, thecandidates are expected to assist in the broader education missionof the department.Job DescriptionMINIMUM QUALIFICATION: Diversity Statement:Florida Polytechnic University is an equal opportunity/equal accessinstitution. It is the policy of the Board of Trustees to provideequal opportunity for employment and educational opportunities toall (including applicants for employment, employees, applicants foradmission, students, and others affiliated with the University)without regard to race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex,religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, marital status,veteran status or genetic information.Special Instructions Regarding Attachments:Required attachments are listed on each posting. Please besure to attach all required documents in the Resume/CV field beforecontinuing through the application. Once your applicationhas been submitted, no changes may be made and additionalattachments will not be considered.An unofficial copy of the degree/transcript is acceptable duringthe application process. For positions requiring a degree, theofficial transcripts are required upon hire.Foreign Transcript: Transcripts issued outside of the United Statesrequire a equivalency statement from a certified transcriptevaluation service verifying the degree equivalency to that of anaccredited institution within the USA. This report must be attachedwith the application and submitted by the applicationdeadline.All document(s) must be received on or before the closing date ofthe job announcements.This position requires a background check, which may includea level II screening as required by the Florida Statute§435.04. Teaching and/or relevant research/industry experienceDemonstrated ability to conduct independent andinterdisciplinary funded applied research.Experience in curriculum delivery and developmentExperience with students’ academic mentoringExperience in program assessment and execution of a continuousimprovement plan. Ph.D. in Mathematics or closely related field with emphasis inthe specializations listed above or related field/ areas. APPLICATION PROCESS: All Applicants are required to submitthe following in PDF format during the application process: ABOUT FLORIDA POLY:Florida Polytechnic University opened for classes in 2014-15 and isthe twelfth university in the Florida State University System. TheUniversity was created as an exclusively STEM-focused publicuniversity that offers high-value undergraduate and graduatedegrees and that has intentional industry connections with a focuson economic development of the high-tech I-4 corridor. Dedicated topreparing students for the competitive STEM workforce, FloridaPolytechnic University blends traditional subject matter masterywith problem solving and laboratory experiences to provide studentswith learning opportunities applicable to both the workplace and acareer of lifelong learning. The University delivers its courses insmall class sizes, emphasizes a positive student to facultyexperience, and is dedicated to both its teaching and researchmission.Faculty are employed at Florida Poly via renewable, term definedappointments, codified in a collective bargaining agreement, thatsubstantially mirrors tenure systems with reappointment andprogression in rank upon completion of a significant review ofaccomplishments.Lakeland, home to Florida Polytechnic University’s ultra-moderncampus, is located along the I-4 High Tech Corridor halfway betweenTampa and Orlando. Our central Florida community combines smalltown comfort with big-city culture. Florida’s High-Tech Corridor ishome to 11,000 high-tech businesses, and Polk County alone has morethan 600,000 residents, four universities and one state college.Lakeland is just a 45-minute drive from Walt Disney World,Universal Studios, professional sports teams, and thrivingperforming art centers. With no income tax in Florida, and homevalues increasing by approximately 10% over the past year, Lakelandand Central Florida continue to rise among the best places to liveand work.EXPECTED STARTING SALARY: Commensurate with experience andqualificationsAPPLICATION DEADLINE DATE: Positions are open until filled (or recruitment cancelled).Review of applications will begin immediately and continue untilthe positions are filled.center_img Employment is contingent upon proof of the legal right to workin the United States. This proof must be provided prior toemployment at the University. An appointment is not final untilproof is provided. Active participation in professional activities andorganizations. Prior professional US experience with progressiveresponsibility.Demonstrated ability to communicate and work effectively withdiverse campus community. Cover letterCurriculum VitaeStatement of Research InterestsStatement of Teaching PhilosophyList of at least 3 professional references (names and contactinformation)Unofficial copy of the Ph.D./M.Sc. transcript DESIRED / PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:last_img read more

CHANNEL 44 NEWS: Washburn Reappointed to House Committee on Courts and Criminal Codes

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first_imgWashburne Reappointed to House Committee on Courts and Criminal CodesDECEMBER 19TH, 2016 BRITNEY TAYLOR EVANSVILLE, INDIANAAn Evansville state representative is reappointed to the House Committee for the 2017 legislative session. Republican State Rep. Tom Washburne will serve as chair of the House Committee on Courts and Criminal Codes. He has also been named to the House Committee on Financial Institutions and the House Judiciary Committee.State Rep. Washburne says, “I both chair and serve on committees that directly affect how the Hoosier court system, both civil and criminal, operates.”House lawmakers will convene on January 4th at 1:30 p.m. in the House Chamber for the first day of the 2017 legislative session. Standing committee hearings can viewed live online at Indiana General Assembly.For a complete list, visit Indiana Republican House Committee Assignments for General Assembly.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

The First Of Owsley Stanley’s Sonic Journals To Be Released In June

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first_imgThe infamous sound engineer for the Grateful Dead, Owsley Stanley, in addition to creating the Grateful Dead’s speaker system, The Wall of Sound, and his legendary lysergic creations, was also well-known for his many “Sonic Journals” — a collection of around 1,300 tapes capturing over eighty different artists recorded by Stanley in San Francisco during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Owsley’s son, Starfinder Stanley, has been tasked with the job of cataloging and transferring his father’s reel-to-reel concert recordings to a digital format. The first fruits of the younger Stanley’s labor will arrive with the release of the seven-disc box set, Doc & Merle Watson: Never The Same Way Once, which is due out on June 23rd.Oteil Burbridge Talks About Taking Owsley LSD At The Gorge With Dead & CompanyOwsley Stanley was known as a brilliant sound engineer, whose focus on microphone placement over the use of a soundboard to equalize the sound characterized his work. For his Sonic Journals, Stanley would capture a set as a whole rather than cutting out and remastering the individual tracks, as noted by his son Starfinder in a recent article in SF Gate, saying, “He really viewed them as capturing a musical event and not as a recording that could be cut up and overdubbed and reconfigured. . . . What he wanted was to present the show as it was experienced. Its warts and all. He wouldn’t fix mistakes.”After Owsley died in 2011, the responsibility of dealing with the immense Sonic Journal archive fell to Starfinder. With these reels having lived in storage for over fifty years, time has increasingly become an issue if these musical records are to be preserved. In the same SF Gate article, Starfinder elaborated, “[Owsley] had told me that if he didn’t manage to deal with the tapes before he died, he expected I would deal with them to his exacting standards. . . . We have to transfer the music off the tapes before the tapes deteriorate and the music is literally lost. . . . They’ve got a finite life span, and it’s just about up.”A New Biography Of Owsley Stanley Ft. Grateful Dead Members Will Soon Be ReleasedNever The Same Way Once is the first Sonic Journal release and foreshadows the release of increasingly more concert recordings from Owsley’s archive. In addition to the Grateful Dead (including the group’s double bill with Miles Davis), other recordings include Johnny Cash, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and more.last_img read more

Fostering a dream

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first_imgKim Snodgrass clearly remembers Dec. 11, 1998. It was her first day in the sixth grade, and the beginning of her steady education — as well as her salvation.“From then on, I never missed a day of school,” said the master’s student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Risk and Prevention Program, who will graduate today armed with ambition and a story of overcoming adversity.Snodgrass, a fresh-faced, blued-eyed blonde, could be a poster child for the stereotypical Californian. She could also be a poster child for foster care.As a young girl, she and her family were on the run. They camped out in the mountains and hopped to and from motels and shelters across southern California. They skipped out on apartments whenever the rent was due. They stole to survive, walking out of grocery stores with carts full of food, or filling up the car at gas stations, and then driving away without paying.“That is what we were so used to, stealing things and getting what we needed whenever we needed it.”Snodgrass watched as her stepfather and mother’s addiction to drugs and alcohol broke the family apart, gradually “disintegrating” her parents in the process. Eventually, her mother lost all rights to her five children. Between age 5 and 11, Snodgrass was in and out of at least 10 foster homes. Finally, at age 16, her long-term foster family adopted her, her younger brother, Max, and sister, Jennifer.“I always knew from an early age what [my mother and stepfather] were doing was wrong, and I made a pact to myself that I was going to get myself out of this hole. I was not ever going to touch drugs or alcohol or smoke, and I was going to make it.”Though she had only had sporadic formal schooling before sixth grade, she knew her escape route depended on education. She became a driven student and excelled academically.“I used my education as my savior. It was like my thing that I could always go back to, no matter what happened in my life.”Snodgrass attended the University of California, Irvine, where she studied community and public service. It was there that she dedicated herself to helping foster care children.“When I entered college, I thought I needed a college degree to have a successful family. As a sophomore, I thought I needed a college degree to change the foster care population, as I found out that only 50 percent of foster youth graduate from high school. My junior year, I realized that I needed a graduate degree to really make an impact and help train others about how they can make change to make an even bigger impact.”With her new master’s degree, she hopes to provide foster care children with access to support systems and mentors who can help them to develop important life skills and succeed in high school and college. As part of her program at Harvard, she developed an intervention method to help foster care youth transition to college and beyond, and is currently working with an HGSE alumna to explore using her program at a local nonprofit.While at Harvard, she also produced an educational video about the foster care system, founded the club REACH (which stands for Realizing Every Action Creates Hope) to raise awareness about foster care youth in school, and worked on a model for a charter school designed for foster care children in connection with the Orangewood Children’s Foundation, a nonprofit in Santa Ana, Calif.She also made time to teach at two local schools. The fast pace is the standard for Snodgrass, who admitted that the overachiever mentality is something of a coping mechanism, one that offers her life a certain kind of balance.“I cram people into every second of the day. My schedule is back to back to back. It’s something that helps [keep] me from sitting down and crying. I don’t just dwell on the past, I think, ‘What can I do tomorrow?’”After Harvard, “the possibilities are endless,” said Snodgrass, who sees herself getting a Ph.D. and working in the policy realm, or running a charter school or nonprofit.But one thing is certain. Citing research that shows that children who face difficult challenges often succeed with the support of just one encouraging voice, Snodgrass sees her future mission clearly.“So many people helped me get where I am today. I want to go back and help others. My mission is to be a child advocate, and become that voice for them.”Her Harvard experience has helped her too, and prepared her to help others.“Harvard was 100 percent where I was supposed to be,” said Snodgrass. “I am going to have a big tool kit when I leave.”last_img read more

Piping up, to good effect

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first_imgCharles Brenton Fisk’s daughter once said that her father was “dedicated to his work the way that some people are dedicated to a true love.” The Memorial Church’s new organ is a product of that devotion.In 1943, the U.S. government tapped Fisk, then an 18-year-old Harvard student, to work for physicist Robert Oppenheimer in the bomb-trigger division of the Manhattan Project. Later, Fisk studied nuclear physics at Stanford University, but soon the onetime chorister at Christ Church in Cambridge traded his lab talents for his workshop skills to craft some of the most complex musical instruments.Eventually another Harvard man, the spiritual heart of the University for more than 40 years, noticed Fisk’s artistry. An accomplished organist himself, the Rev. Peter J. Gomes became the driving force behind a donor-funded, $6 million effort to provide his church with the type of sound it deserved.Senior reed voicer Michael Kraft tunes the row of pipes called the Trumpette.The dream of Gomes, who died a year ago, will be realized this Sunday when the new Fisk organ, Opus 139, is officially unveiled. The inauguration begins a series of events showcasing the 16-ton instrument.A 2005 committee led by Gomes agreed that two organs instead of one were needed to fill the church’s space adequately, one for the intimate Appleton Chapel, the other for the main body of the church. For the larger instrument, they turned to C.B. Fisk Inc., the mechanical-tracker organ company founded by Fisk, whose Opus 46 had been in the chapel since 1967.“Fisk epitomizes the classical principles of organ building,” said Christian Lane, associate University organist and choirmaster. “Through a well-constructed, mechanical-action touch … you are really just controlling the wind in this amazing and voluptuous way.”In 2010, the Opus 46 was dismantled for shipping to its new home, a Presbyterian church in Austin, Texas. A 1929 Skinner Organ Co. organ took its place in the chapel.Meanwhile, the new Fisk organ slated for the church’s rear gallery was nearing completion in a town more famous for its fishing fleet than for complicated musical machines. Only a small mahogany sign with the words “C.B. Fisk” identifies the workshop in an industrial park in Gloucester, Mass. Inside, dedicated artisans draft and draw, solder and saw. Small models of every organ the company has made are perched high on ledges scattered around the space. The models are a vital step in the creative process that begins with hand-drawn sketches and ends with sophisticated, three-dimensional computer designs.There’s a collegial ethos at the workshop, a Fisk hallmark. When there is a technical problem, the workers gather to discuss a solution. A reporter’s inquiry about business titles earns chuckles and the response: “We don’t pay too much attention to that kind of thing.”The employees are a mix of the mechanical and the musical, the methodical and the meticulous. A crafter of organ reed pipes is, fittingly, a clarinetist. Another worker made his own cello. There are drummers and guitarists, former boatbuilders, cabinetmakers, engineers, and freelance photographers. Above all, they are craftspeople who love working with their hands.Fisk, the story goes, liked to call his colleagues “blue-scholar workers.”“He was the most brilliant man I ever met,” said Greg Bover, the company’s vice president for operations, who is also project manager for the Memorial Church installation.The mouth area of gold-leafed pipe on the organ’s façade.At Harvard one recent afternoon, Michael Kraft, the company’s head reed voicer, was regulating the tone on some of the organ’s 3,049 pipes, the smallest of which stands only half an inch, and the largest 32 feet. The painstaking task takes months, for good reason. Tuning the organ only affects the pitch, explained Kraft, while the voicing process gives the instrument its distinct sound.“It’s giving each pipe its voice … we are talking about color, timbre, speech, all of the different qualities of the sound. That voicing process is only done once.”Kraft, who has a master’s degree in organ performance from the New England Conservatory, then tested his work by playing a little Johann Sebastian Bach. The sound was magnificent.Harvard’s Gund University Organist and Choirmaster Edward Jones reflected on Gomes’ musical legacy. Thanks to the insistence of the longtime Pusey Minister and Plummer Professor of Christian Morals, the organ’s pipes are sheathed in a brilliant 22-carat gold.“It’s a wonderful instrument. It’s musically eclectic and can do a large range of things,” said Jones. “The construction and architecture of the organ is so beautiful and has been so well thought out that it looks to my mind like it should have been here all along. I hope Peter is looking down with a big smile on his face.”last_img read more

Let’s put on a show

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first_imgAs a Harvard undergraduate, Diane Paulus haunted the halls of the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.), trying to absorb every ounce of its energy and ethos. She dreamed of being cast in an A.R.T. production, a rare but real option for a gifted College actor if a director saw fit. She worked as an usher and attended every show she could, but it wasn’t until after she left Harvard that she got a close look at a professional theater rehearsal.“I wasn’t inside a rehearsal hall until graduate school — that opportunity to just be in a high-level process. I remember thinking when I was a young director, ‘How do you direct? … Maybe one day I will get to see it.’”Since Paulus ’88 took the helm of the A.R.T. as its artistic director in 2009, she has made sure that undergraduates interested in the business of professional theater can have a chance to see every side of that high-octane process up close as part of the theater’s robust internship program.As part of Wintersession between semesters, nine College students traveled to New York City as A.R.T. interns to help Paulus and her production team in the exciting and exhaustive process of bringing a new production to life. The musical “Witness Uganda” will have its world premiere at the A.R.T. on Feb. 4.Intern Mark Mauriello ’15 working with Paulus. As producing intern Mauriello kept tabs on the show’s daily operations.For close to a month, the students, along with the cast and crew, worked on the show that explores the challenges faced by American aid workers around the world. The interns helped with everything from script edits to learning the show’s complex choreography.They had a hand in “all the intricate layers of the physical life of a production,” said Paulus. “They were really heart and soul involved in it, and impacting the whole process.”Producing intern Mark Mauriello ’15 kept tabs on the show’s daily operations. From a spot on the floor in the front of the rehearsal room, he took meticulous notes, watching for changes in the show’s set, staging, or script, and reporting back to the producer in Cambridge.“Every day is totally different, which is part of the best thing about it,” said Mauriello during a lunch break from rehearsals.The Kirkland House junior has long been involved with Harvard’s theater scene, and is currently performing in “The Donkey Show,” rolling around Oberon’s disco-themed set on skates as the character Dr. Wheelgood. A theater arts and performance concentrator who is planning a career in the field, Mauriello he said he was “really, really lucky,” to have worked with the A.R.T.“To be able to sit in the room with someone like Diane Paulus, who is so unbelievably brilliant and great at what she does, and just to learn by watching her do things and being engaged with her work is a huge learning experience.”Choreography intern Megan Murdock ’14 relied on her experience in southwestern Uganda last summer studying traditional East African dance to offer suggestions and information to the choreography team during her internship.A neurobiology concentrator, Murdock explained certain customs to the cast and crew, like how the ankle rattle, something the choreographers considered adding to a production number, is used in the Ugandan dances she learned, and the nuances of the local handshake. She also helped to track the blocking of each dance sequence, and the videotape of some dance numbers.Breaking into the competitive world of theater is notoriously tough, but the interns agreed that their A.R.T. experience has helped them.“It gives you a leg up when you get out of college if you’ve already had the chance to work in a professional production environment,” said Murdock, who hopes to pursue a career in dance after graduation. She added that Paulus’ reputation as a dynamic director was quickly confirmed. “I had heard about her and how amazing she is to work with … and it’s all true.”As one of the two stage management interns working with the show, the job of Jumai Yusuf ’16 during rehearsals was to help manage the sets’ moving parts and props, and to take detailed notes about where items needed to go at any point in the show.At Harvard, Yusuf, a neurobiology concentrator, has managed, produced, or directed student productions. But she said being in the room watching and helping a professional show come to life was something different.“One of the biggest differences is that they’re rehearsing the show, but but they are also working on the script. They are making script changes very often throughout the day. It was really cool to see that happen, and to see what things ended up changing.”And getting to watch Paulus in full directing mode was special.“She is so creative. She makes little changes that I would never have thought of that then greatly enhance the production. … It’s really fascinating to see her work.”Paulus said the challenge of creating a new work is a complex, collaborative process, one that should be an integral part of the learning process at Harvard.“Things are pushed, pulled, rejected, tried on, tried a different way … all of that is really the experience, which is such a theme of what we are talking about at Harvard. How do we provide that experience for our students, that investigation of the process, of the questions you ask, and show [students] how delicate and hard it is to crack something open?”Seniors Lily Glimcher, Susanna Wolk, and Madeline Smith; juniors Brenna McDuffie and Selena Kim; and freshman Kyra Atekwana also worked as A.R.T. interns with the production.last_img read more

Sustainable Food Systems

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first_imgThe University of Georgia Sustainable Food Systems Initiative has awarded three interdisciplinary teams of faculty with the initiative’s third round of Sustainable Food Systems Fellowships. In 2013, faculty representing several UGA colleges launched the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, which recognizes that many of the problems facing the intersection of agricultural and natural ecology require interdisciplinary solutions. “One of the grand challenges facing humanity over the next 50 years is increasing the security and resiliency of the food systems,” said Liz Kramer, director of the Natural Resources Spatial Analysis Laboratory and of the Sustainable Food System Initiative. “Building sustainable food production, processing and distribution systems will require integrating a wide range of environmental, economic and social issues.” These fellowships, which will be given to graduate students beginning in fall 2017, will be paid for by a grant from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA). This is the second NIFA grant that the initiative has received to fund its fellowships. Six master’s degree students have benefited from this program since 2013. The initiative’s goal is to set up a collaborative framework to enable interdepartmental faculty to collaborate on questions of agricultural production, energy, water, the environment, economics, health, nutrition and social justice. This year, the selection committee has selected three projects for funding:Robert Bringolf, Warnell School of Forestry associate professor, and Nick Fuhrman, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences assistant professor, will develop a resource program for teaching farmers about sustainable aquaponics systems.Chad Paton, College of Family and Consumer Sciences assistant professor, and Dave Hoisington, senior research scientist and director of the UGA-housed U.S. Feed the Future Peanut and Mycotoxin Innovation Lab, will investigate improving agricultural production methods of increasing vitamin A intake in sub-Saharan Africa.Janani Rajbhandari-Thapa and Donglan Zhan, assistant professors in the College of Public Health’s Department of Health Policy and Management, and Melissa Hallow, assistant professor in the College of Engineering and CPH’s Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, will investigate and model the interaction between consumer behavior and food supply and how that relationship can help support a healthy and sustainable food system in Georgia.“Since we received the initial grant that set up the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, we have seen some very successful research projects and some very talented graduate students,” Kramer said. “I believe these projects are proving that the possibilities that come with collaborative research are worth leaving our silos and finding like-minded scientists across campus.” The current NIFA grant will also help launch a new graduate certificate in Sustainable Food Systems, which is pending approval. The certificate will be housed in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “We hope to use the certificate to expand interdisciplinary training in sustainable food systems beyond the fellowships and our monthly seminar series,” Kramer added. “In addition, we hope these new programs will help us to reach non-traditional and underrepresented students to explore new areas of interdisciplinary research.For more information about UGA’s Sustainable Food Systems Initiative and past projects, visit http://sustainablefoodsystems.uga.edu.last_img read more

Washington update, millennials, credit union relevance headline exec sessions at NAFCU Annual

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first_imgCredit union executives at NAFCU’s Annual Conference on Thursday received a Washington update from the association’s legislative and regulatory staff, learned how to stay relevant to the industry and were briefed on how to retain and hire millennials.NAFCU’s legislative and regulatory teams spoke in an open format to credit union executives, providing an update on the industry and what is happening in Washington. (Read more here.)Also on Thursday, NAFCU Director of Education Devon Lyon led a session on the relevancy of credit unions. He touched on mobile banking and electronic financial services, such as ATMs, online loan payments and remote deposit capture. He also discussed the importance of data security and fintech.Jennifer Kuhn, leadership and team development expert at Jennifer Kuhn LLC, talked about hiring and retaining millennials. She discussed this generation’s communication preferences and the importance of credit unions knowing their audience. continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more