Category Archives: ujcou

Education entrepreneur relists East Hampton estate for $95M

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first_img Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink hamptons-weeklylong islandThe Hamptonstristate-weekly Chris Whittle and his East Hampton estate (Photos via Trulia and Meridian)The founder of Avenues: The World School has relisted his 11.2-acre East Hampton estate with a major price cut as he faces a potential forced auction to repay debts to his former company, according to the Wall Street Journal.Chris Whittle, who left the posh private school company in 2018, is now asking $95 million for the property. It hit the market in 2014 for $140 million, but has been off the market for a few years.Avenues Global Holdings, the company that owns the private schools Whittle founded, said last year that he hasn’t repaid millions of dollars it lent him in 2013.A spokesperson said that Whittle owes the company $6.7 million and hasn’t made a payment since 2019. The spokesperson also said the Suffolk County Sheriff’s office would publish an auction notice soon. Such a sale could take place as soon as April unless Whittle repays his debts. [WSJ] — Dennis Lynch Tagslast_img read more

Debris accumulation on oceanic island shores of the Scotia Arc, Antarctica

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first_imgThe oceanic islands in the Southern Ocean can be considered amongst the remotest shores as, not only are they uninhabited (except for small research stations) and geographically isolated, but they are also enclosed by the oceanographic barrier of the Polar Frontal Zone. We survey island shores in the Scotia Arc mountain chain linking Antarctica to South America, including South Georgia, the South Sandwich archipelago and Adelaide Island off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, and compare our findings to literature reports from two other Scotia Arc island groups (South Orkney and South Shetland archipelagos). The presence of marine pollution (in the form of beached debris) in this region is significant, both as a measure of man’s influence on this isolated environment, and due to direct dangers posed to the fauna. This paper reports the results of surveys of beached marine debris at various times in the last decade for each island group. The majority (> 70%) of the items recovered were anthropogenic in origin and most of these were synthetic (plastic or polystyrene). Debris densities varied from zero to 0.3 items m(-1) but were typically lower than those reported from other regions of the globe. At some localities (South Georgia), marine-debris data showed a close relationship with local fishery activity, whilst at others (South Sandwich Islands) debris appeared to have a more distant origin. Unlike oceanic debris in warm (non-polar) water localities, there was no evidence of any colonisation by biota. Debris accumulation may provide a useful indirect measure of local fishery activity and compliance with CCAMLR regulations, as well as monitoring the state of the oceans and island shores.last_img read more

Sri Lanka Navy Rescues Indian Fishermen

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first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Sri Lanka Navy Rescues Indian Fishermen The Indian fishing vessel ran-aground in the seas south of Delft on 28th September 2014.The rescued fishermen were handed over to Delft police for further action.[mappress]Press Release, September 30, 2014; Image: Sri Lanka Navy Sri Lanka Navy patrol craft attached to the Northern Naval Command on routine patrol rescued four Indian fishermen. Sri Lanka Navy Rescues Indian Fishermen View post tag: asia View post tag: Naval View post tag: Sri Lanka Navy View post tag: Fishermen View post tag: Indian View post tag: News by topic Authorities View post tag: rescues Share this article September 30, 2014 View post tag: Navylast_img read more

Otters team up with Easter Seals to boost Home Run Sweeps fundraiser.

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first_imgEaster Seals reports that approximately 2,400 of the 3,000 tickets are still unsold for the 25th annual Home Run Sweeps ALL CA$H Raffle, which raises funds for therapy services at the Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center. Raffle grand prize is $100,000, 2nd prize is $10,000 and 3rdprize is $5,000.  Ticket sales began on January 5 and will continue until the raffle drawing, scheduled for March 14.The Evansville Otters are teaming up with Easter Seals in an effort to boost sales of the $100 Home Run raffle chances.  The Otters have donated a Family Fun Pack as an “incentive” for people to enter the Home Run Sweeps this week.  Anyone who says “Otters” when purchasing an Easter Seals Home Run Sweeps ticket by 5 p.m. this Friday, Feb. 19, will be entered in a drawing for the Otters Family Fun Pack, which includes 12 general admission tickets for an Otters home game during the 2016 season; those tickets can be used all at once or split up and used for different games.To buy Home Run Sweeps chances before Friday’s 5 p.m. “Otters” deadline, visit the Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center, 3701 Bellemeade Avenue, Evansville, IN 47714, 8am-5pm AND SAY “OTTERS” when purchasing. The $100 tickets may be purchased individually or by groups (family members, co-workers, friends, clubs, etc.).On March 14 at noon, ALL sold tickets will be entered in the Home Run Sweeps ALL CA$H Raffle drawing at the Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center to determine the winners of all prizes. Ticket holders do not have to be present to win.Official rules can be found online at www.EasterSealsSWIndiana.com. Indiana Raffle License Number for this event is #139590. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Johnstone’s Bakers trebles turnover

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first_imgJohnstone’s Bakers has announced that its turnover has more than trebled since 2007 following a major investment in a state-of-the-art factory.The independently-owned Scottish firm said that following a £7m investment three years ago, which saw the company relocate to a new site in East Kilbride, the firm’s turnover has risen from £2.1m in 2007 to £7.4m in 2009.During the same period, it also won international contracts to supply the USA, Australia and Russia, and achieved its highest-ever monthly sales in June this year.Johnstone’s said it has seen its export business grow significantly over the last three years, and revealed that it is currently gearing up to fulfil a new contract, which will see its products distributed throughout 15 countries across Europe. A spokesperson for the firm said the new contract is for an own-label range for one of Europe’s multiple retail chains.In order to cope with increased demand for its recently launched Connie’s range, the firm has also announced it is to invest a further £400,000 in its production area. The expansion will include the addition of new equipment, including an enrobing machine and a machine that will allow the bakery to make its own chocolate.Johnstone’s Bakers produces a number of cake, cereal and biscuit bars and slices, including caramel shortcake, lemon cheesecake and rocky road, orange chocolate tiffin, chocolate tiffin and Black Forest brownie.last_img read more

Artisan bakery scoops national award

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first_imgNorthumberland-based artisan bakery The Running Fox has won a Country Homes and Interiors My Country Business Award.The Morpeth bakery won the Hospitality and Leisure category, and will receive coverage in Country Homes and Interiors magazine and business mentoring sessions from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s River Cottage team as part of its prize.Kris Blackburn, owner of the Running Fox, expressed her delight at the win and said her goal was to open premises in every village in her local area.She said: “My dream is a quality bakery and cakery in every village – let’s see if Hugh can help us make our dreams come true.“It’s the sort of national exposure and business expertise that money just can’t buy for a small rural business like ours, and I’m really looking forward to seeing what business experts think about the way we can develop.”Earlier this year, The Running Fox took the Coolest Café of the Year title, as part of the WOW24/7 Awards 2016, and also recently expanded into a second premises. It sells handmade cakes, pies and artisan breads, all baked on-site.last_img read more

On the Silk Road again

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first_imgIt wasn’t your average day in the expansive Spangler lounge at Harvard Business School (HBS).The sounds of a Galician bagpipe, a conch shell, a tambourine, and a host of other instruments shattered the hall’s typically hushed atmosphere to the delight of a large lunchtime crowd of potential future entrepreneurs and CEOs.Clad in a dark blue pinstripe suit, HBS Dean Nitin Nohria happily plunked himself on the floor, the only place left to sit, and quickly began tapping his foot to an infectious beat as members of the Silk Road Ensemble partook in a brief performance and discussion with the audience. The event was part of the ensemble’s weeklong residency at Harvard.Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria (lower right) happily plunked himself on the floor, the only place left to sit.Affiliated with the University since 2005, the group, made up of internationally renowned performers and composers from more than 20 countries and led by celebrated cellist and Harvard alumnus Yo-Yo Ma, moved to its North Harvard Street headquarters in Allston last year.The residency is part of a five-year collaboration between Harvard and the Silk Road Project, a nonprofit inspired by the cultural traditions of the ancient Eurasian Silk Road trade routes that connected east with west. The project promotes learning through the arts. For the next several years, the ensemble will present a series of performances, workshops, and collaborations with local arts, cultural, and educational institutions.In collaborating with HBS, the ensemble hopes to engage with and learn from future business leaders focused on social entrepreneurship. It also aims to explore the intersection between the worlds of business and the arts, and the notion of cultural entrepreneurship.The idea for it grew out of a meeting between Laura Freid, the Silk Road Project’s chief executive officer and executive director, and Nohria, who discussed the importance of common interests and the meaning of creating value in society, said Ma, the project’s founder and artistic director.Tabla composer Sandeep Das (left) performs with his group at the Harvard Business School event.“We always say that in music the tip of the iceberg is the sound, but what’s behind the sound is the music, which is actually values,” said Ma. He said that the ensemble will work with the Business School and other Schools at Harvard to identify those values.“Then the things that you do,” Ma said, “are the things that make those values visible.”During the week, the ensemble also helped Harvard undergraduates to create music. Last Saturday, student composers met with members of the ensemble and were introduced to some of the group’s instruments, including a gaita, a Galician bagpipe; a shakuhachi, a Japanese bamboo flute; and a jang-go, a Korean hourglass drum.The young composers then worked overnight creating compositions based on either traditional melodies from India or Galicia, Spain. On Sunday, the students reconvened to work on their scores with support and input from ensemble members.For freshman George Meyer, being up all night was a small price to pay for creating a composition with the help of such gifted musicians. Meyer, a talented violinist from Nashville who has a classical music background but is also steeped in the bluegrass tradition, called the collaboration “thrilling.”“They have composers who are working on their own pieces with the group right now, so we got to work with them as we were doing the same thing.”“It was intense,” said Meyer, “but very fun. … It’s a fun challenge to deal with something as loud as the bagpipes and as soft as some of the other instruments like the kamancheh,” a bowed Persian instrument.Some student performers also learned pieces from the group’s non-Western repertoire, which they will perform with the ensemble during a sold-out concert at Harvard’s New College Theatre tonight at 7, an event presented by the Office of the President. Ma and Homi Bhabha, director of the Mahindra Humanities Center, will give a pre-concert talk on neighborliness and the arts.“One of our guiding principles at the Silk Road Project is that the best teachers are also the best learners,” said Freid. “So it has been truly rewarding to watch the fluid dynamic of teaching and learning unfold this week in our collaboration with Harvard undergraduates. We were especially excited to work with students in creating new arrangements for the ensemble. In this way, we are hoping to encourage the student body to become an active part of our roving creative laboratory.”Later this week, members of the ensemble will also take part in a class called “The Arts In Education: Learning In and Through the Arts” at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The class is taught by Steve Seidel, director of the School’s Arts in Education Program. The group will return to Harvard in January for an intensive workshop.Allison Johnson with 5-year-old daughter Clara watch as cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Project perform.last_img read more

Broadway.com Readers Rank the Best Gender-Bending Broadway Roles

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first_img Angel in RENT Hedwig in HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH Edna Turnblad in HAIRSPRAY Yitzhak in HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH Peter in PETER PAN Miss Trunchbull in MATILDA Frank ‘N’ Furter in THE ROCKY HORROR SHOWcenter_img The D’Ysquiths in A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE Emcee in CABARET Have you heard the news? Darren Criss is high-kicking his way into the Tony-winning musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch after co-creator John Cameron Mitchell departs in April. Naturally, we had drag on the brain, so we asked you to rank your favorite gender-bending Broadway roles on Culturalist.com. Put on some makeup, turn up the eight-track and find out who came out on top! Lola in KINKY BOOTS View Commentslast_img

Grubby details

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first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of GeorgiaThe rear end of a white grub isn’t a pretty sight. But if you’regoing to identify the grubs that are damaging your lawn,somebody’s got to look.That somebody is going to have to use a magnifying glass, too,which makes the grub’s rear end look even bigger.Lately, I’ve had a lot of calls about crows and even wild turkeysdigging up turf grass looking for stuff to eat. In a lot of thesecases, the birds are digging for grubs in the soil.Moles, skunks, raccoons and armadillos, as well as birds, all canroot up the turf hunting for grubs. And even if animals aren’tdigging, the grubs themselves can damage turf grasses.Damage symptomsMost grubs feed on grass roots, cutting the plants off from waterand nutrients. Damage from grubs appears as yellowing or browningof the leaves, signs of drought stress even when there’smoisture, and loose turf that pulls easily from the soil.A typical phone caller will say something like, “Mike, I was outmowing my lawn and my mower just tore up the grass by the roots.”Sounds like grub damage to me.Grubs feed most actively and are easiest to control during latesummer and early fall. But they may be active in warm periodsthroughout the winter.Main culpritsMore than a dozen species may damage turf in the Southeast, butthe main ones we have are green June beetles, chafers, Japanesebeetles and May beetles or June beetles.While white grubs in general are among the hardest turf pests tocontrol, the green June beetle grub is one of the easiest.Because they come to the surface at night, green June beetlegrubs come in contact with insecticides more readily than theother grubs that remain deeper in the ground.To check for white grubs, cut three sides of a square foot ofturf with a shovel. Then fold the sod flap back and look forgrubs in the top 2 or 3 inches of soil and roots.Some species can damage turf with just four grubs per squarefoot. Others can have 10 to 20 per square foot and still notdamage turf.Which grubs?If you find white grubs in your soil, how do you know which oneit is? Well, if it crawls on its back, with its legs sticking upin the air, it’s a green June beetle. I’m not making this up –they do crawl on their backs.If they don’t crawl on their backs, that’s when you use yourmagnifying glass. But you have to be willing to get close, andyou have to know what you’re looking for. It’s not for thesqueamish.With an identification key available from the Extension Service,you can identify the grubs you find. If you can identify them,your county agent can tell you what to use to control them.You don’t have to be an entomologist to identify a grub. But aproctologist? Maybe.(Mike Isbell is the Heard County Extension Coordinator withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.)last_img read more