Category Archives: ujcou

On the Silk Road again

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first_imgIt wasn’t your average day in the expansive Spangler lounge at Harvard Business School (HBS).The sounds of a Galician bagpipe, a conch shell, a tambourine, and a host of other instruments shattered the hall’s typically hushed atmosphere to the delight of a large lunchtime crowd of potential future entrepreneurs and CEOs.Clad in a dark blue pinstripe suit, HBS Dean Nitin Nohria happily plunked himself on the floor, the only place left to sit, and quickly began tapping his foot to an infectious beat as members of the Silk Road Ensemble partook in a brief performance and discussion with the audience. The event was part of the ensemble’s weeklong residency at Harvard.Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria (lower right) happily plunked himself on the floor, the only place left to sit.Affiliated with the University since 2005, the group, made up of internationally renowned performers and composers from more than 20 countries and led by celebrated cellist and Harvard alumnus Yo-Yo Ma, moved to its North Harvard Street headquarters in Allston last year.The residency is part of a five-year collaboration between Harvard and the Silk Road Project, a nonprofit inspired by the cultural traditions of the ancient Eurasian Silk Road trade routes that connected east with west. The project promotes learning through the arts. For the next several years, the ensemble will present a series of performances, workshops, and collaborations with local arts, cultural, and educational institutions.In collaborating with HBS, the ensemble hopes to engage with and learn from future business leaders focused on social entrepreneurship. It also aims to explore the intersection between the worlds of business and the arts, and the notion of cultural entrepreneurship.The idea for it grew out of a meeting between Laura Freid, the Silk Road Project’s chief executive officer and executive director, and Nohria, who discussed the importance of common interests and the meaning of creating value in society, said Ma, the project’s founder and artistic director.Tabla composer Sandeep Das (left) performs with his group at the Harvard Business School event.“We always say that in music the tip of the iceberg is the sound, but what’s behind the sound is the music, which is actually values,” said Ma. He said that the ensemble will work with the Business School and other Schools at Harvard to identify those values.“Then the things that you do,” Ma said, “are the things that make those values visible.”During the week, the ensemble also helped Harvard undergraduates to create music. Last Saturday, student composers met with members of the ensemble and were introduced to some of the group’s instruments, including a gaita, a Galician bagpipe; a shakuhachi, a Japanese bamboo flute; and a jang-go, a Korean hourglass drum.The young composers then worked overnight creating compositions based on either traditional melodies from India or Galicia, Spain. On Sunday, the students reconvened to work on their scores with support and input from ensemble members.For freshman George Meyer, being up all night was a small price to pay for creating a composition with the help of such gifted musicians. Meyer, a talented violinist from Nashville who has a classical music background but is also steeped in the bluegrass tradition, called the collaboration “thrilling.”“They have composers who are working on their own pieces with the group right now, so we got to work with them as we were doing the same thing.”“It was intense,” said Meyer, “but very fun. … It’s a fun challenge to deal with something as loud as the bagpipes and as soft as some of the other instruments like the kamancheh,” a bowed Persian instrument.Some student performers also learned pieces from the group’s non-Western repertoire, which they will perform with the ensemble during a sold-out concert at Harvard’s New College Theatre tonight at 7, an event presented by the Office of the President. Ma and Homi Bhabha, director of the Mahindra Humanities Center, will give a pre-concert talk on neighborliness and the arts.“One of our guiding principles at the Silk Road Project is that the best teachers are also the best learners,” said Freid. “So it has been truly rewarding to watch the fluid dynamic of teaching and learning unfold this week in our collaboration with Harvard undergraduates. We were especially excited to work with students in creating new arrangements for the ensemble. In this way, we are hoping to encourage the student body to become an active part of our roving creative laboratory.”Later this week, members of the ensemble will also take part in a class called “The Arts In Education: Learning In and Through the Arts” at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The class is taught by Steve Seidel, director of the School’s Arts in Education Program. The group will return to Harvard in January for an intensive workshop.Allison Johnson with 5-year-old daughter Clara watch as cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Project perform.last_img read more

Broadway.com Readers Rank the Best Gender-Bending Broadway Roles

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first_img Angel in RENT Hedwig in HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH Edna Turnblad in HAIRSPRAY Yitzhak in HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH Peter in PETER PAN Miss Trunchbull in MATILDA Frank ‘N’ Furter in THE ROCKY HORROR SHOWcenter_img The D’Ysquiths in A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE Emcee in CABARET Have you heard the news? Darren Criss is high-kicking his way into the Tony-winning musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch after co-creator John Cameron Mitchell departs in April. Naturally, we had drag on the brain, so we asked you to rank your favorite gender-bending Broadway roles on Culturalist.com. Put on some makeup, turn up the eight-track and find out who came out on top! Lola in KINKY BOOTS View Commentslast_img

Grubby details

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first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of GeorgiaThe rear end of a white grub isn’t a pretty sight. But if you’regoing to identify the grubs that are damaging your lawn,somebody’s got to look.That somebody is going to have to use a magnifying glass, too,which makes the grub’s rear end look even bigger.Lately, I’ve had a lot of calls about crows and even wild turkeysdigging up turf grass looking for stuff to eat. In a lot of thesecases, the birds are digging for grubs in the soil.Moles, skunks, raccoons and armadillos, as well as birds, all canroot up the turf hunting for grubs. And even if animals aren’tdigging, the grubs themselves can damage turf grasses.Damage symptomsMost grubs feed on grass roots, cutting the plants off from waterand nutrients. Damage from grubs appears as yellowing or browningof the leaves, signs of drought stress even when there’smoisture, and loose turf that pulls easily from the soil.A typical phone caller will say something like, “Mike, I was outmowing my lawn and my mower just tore up the grass by the roots.”Sounds like grub damage to me.Grubs feed most actively and are easiest to control during latesummer and early fall. But they may be active in warm periodsthroughout the winter.Main culpritsMore than a dozen species may damage turf in the Southeast, butthe main ones we have are green June beetles, chafers, Japanesebeetles and May beetles or June beetles.While white grubs in general are among the hardest turf pests tocontrol, the green June beetle grub is one of the easiest.Because they come to the surface at night, green June beetlegrubs come in contact with insecticides more readily than theother grubs that remain deeper in the ground.To check for white grubs, cut three sides of a square foot ofturf with a shovel. Then fold the sod flap back and look forgrubs in the top 2 or 3 inches of soil and roots.Some species can damage turf with just four grubs per squarefoot. Others can have 10 to 20 per square foot and still notdamage turf.Which grubs?If you find white grubs in your soil, how do you know which oneit is? Well, if it crawls on its back, with its legs sticking upin the air, it’s a green June beetle. I’m not making this up –they do crawl on their backs.If they don’t crawl on their backs, that’s when you use yourmagnifying glass. But you have to be willing to get close, andyou have to know what you’re looking for. It’s not for thesqueamish.With an identification key available from the Extension Service,you can identify the grubs you find. If you can identify them,your county agent can tell you what to use to control them.You don’t have to be an entomologist to identify a grub. But aproctologist? Maybe.(Mike Isbell is the Heard County Extension Coordinator withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Regional Police Chiefs Plan Operation to Curtail Weapons Trafficking

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first_img “Although there are no Central American countries that manufacture firearms, about 2,826,000 weapons are circulating in the region, and two out of three are illegal, which is a risk factor for crime and insecurity throughout the region,” it added. The meeting, held in a hotel near the Pacific coast of Sonsonate, 115 km southwest of San Salvador, aimed to “organize” the second “Regional Operation for Weapon Seizure” or “ORCA II”, using the experiences gathered from the first operation in 2011. On April 18, Central American, Mexican, Caribbean, and Colombian police chiefs met for a two-day meeting in El Salvador, to coordinate a regional operation against weapons trafficking, with the goal of reducing violence, the Central American Integration System (SICA) reported. The operation will be coordinated and promoted by SICA Secretary General Juan Daniel Alemán, and by the Commission of Central American, Mexican, Caribbean and Colombian Chiefs of Police (CJPCAMCC) as part of the support for the fight against illegal firearms carrying and trafficking in Central America and neighboring countries, funded by the European Union. Sixty-three members of the CJPCAMCC, personnel of the Central American Program for Small Arms and Light Weapons Control, and representatives of the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (UNLIREC), attended the meeting, during which Interpol and the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives officials also shared their experiences on disarmament. By Dialogo April 22, 2013 The SICA initiative intended to “contribute to strengthening citizen security in Central America, to reduce the impact and potential harm of armed violence from a human development perspective,” the organization stated. last_img read more

The profession faces challenges that must be met

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first_imgThe profession faces challenges that must be met Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Even though former Florida Supreme Court Justice Major Harding considers himself an optimist, challenges faced by the judiciary can be downright depressing.“I feel like the guy walking around with the sign: ‘Repent! The end is near!’” Harding said in his keynote address at the General Assembly at the Bar’s Annual Convention in Boca Raton June 23.“But there is something we can do. We can repent. We can change. And we can meet this challenge.”Among the challenges Harding listed: • There is a need to educate those who come to America from other countries about the value of an independent judiciary.“One out of two people living in Miami-Dade County was born in another country. Did you know that?” Harding asked.“Yeah, I did,” said Bar President-elect Frank Angones, born in Cuba.“He’s one of the two,” Harding continued, to laughter.“These people come into our country, many of them have no tradition of an independent and nonpoliticized judiciary. I’ve been told by lawyers and judges, throughout the state and throughout the country, that many of these people have a tradition of bribery and corruption to get favorable decisions. I think it presents to us, as members of the Bar, a significant challenge to tell these friends what a wonderful system we have and how things get done better the way we do it.”• There is a growing divide between the rich and the poor. “We hear that many families making a living wage cannot find adequate housing for their families. A startling headline in the Jacksonville paper just a few days ago said that one out of 50 on the First Coast are homeless. One out of 50! My friends, that is startling!”• County courts have become a collection court, primarily for credit card debt. “Whether these assertions are true, they are statewide; they are a concern; and we as members of the Bar should consider them a challenge,” Harding said.• Eighty percent of the civil legal needs of low-income Americans are not being met, and half of those who come to legal aid seeking civil legal help are turned away, according to a recent report from the Legal Services Corp.• In family law cases, one or both parties are unrepresented in 70 percent of cases. “Even more alarming is that the pollsters tell us that there is a greater satisfaction rate for those who go through the system without an attorney than those who go with an attorney,” Harding said.• A constitutional amendment petition drive by Florida J.A.I.L. 4 Judges “claims to be able to sanction corrupt judges with civil lawsuits and even jail. It claims that J.A.I.L. (Judicial Accountability Initiative Law) is totally in the hands of the people and is accountable to no government body,” Harding said. “And, my friends, this is an effort to undermine the very foundation of our country and places at risk freedoms and liberties we have been so blessed to have.”In a call to action to Florida lawyers, Harding said he is signing up to take legal aid cases, now that he is a lawyer once again after 34 years as a judge.“I have a particular interest in contributing to the legal aid in Jacksonville. It’s housed in a building entitled the Major B. Harding Center. As my wife, Jane said, ‘It’s wonderful to have a building named after you because you have to behave yourself the rest of your life!’”Harding said he is also going to support Chief Justice Fred Lewis’s efforts to educate children “about our precious heritage of our governmental role in securing our liberties and freedoms. More than that, Justice Lewis, I am going to volunteer the Bar, the whole Bar, to join in an education blitz with you for civics education.”For those who may laugh about whether Florida’s lawyers can meet the challenges, Harding quoted Florida lawyer Martha Barnett, former president of the ABA:“One vote, one act, one person can change the course of history. I thought of the lawyers who daily and tirelessly labor in the vineyards of justice, men and women who represent their clients with integrity, ethics, and professionalism, and who think nothing of it. Because that’s what lawyers do. Yet often these individuals are the very people who change the world.”To Florida’s lawyers, Harding challenged: “You can be that one person. You can join with me to reduce the number of people who are turned away from legal aid. You can be the one who will contribute with me to send money to legal aid associations in your area. You can be the one who will help change the course of history and help preserve this wonderful heritage created for us by our founders. You can be the one who will help the efforts of our new Florida Bar President Hank Coxe, who this year will walk in the shoes of those who have so faithfully gone before him.” July 15, 2006 Regular Newscenter_img The profession faces challenges that must be met last_img read more

Yes at NYCB Theatre at Westbury (Preview)

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York British rockers Yes have seamlessly overcome a generational alteration in their audience and are considered among the longest continuing and utmost successful bands of the ’70s progressive rock groups.With 21 albums under their belt, Yes can justifiable be treated as one of the lasting achievement stories and pioneers from that musical genre, mixing progressive and symphonic styles. They’re renowned for their usage of cosmic and mystical lyrics combined with complicated instrumental and vocal arrangements.Despite the departure of key members over the decades, Yes has still produced top-charting music. Nine of their albums have reached the top 10 in either the UK or the US charts, with two reaching the number one spot in the UK. Their current members include Chris Squire (bass), Alan White (drums), Steve Howe (guitars), Jon Davison (vocals) and Geoff Downes (keyboards). Squire is the only founding member to appear on every album, influencing generations of bassists with his incisive sound and sophisticated bass lines. White can be attributed to more than 50 appearances on collaborated albums and has been a member since ‘72. Howe has the second longest tenure on Yes, becoming a member in ‘70, he has also been a member of Syndicats, Bodast, Tomorrow, Asia and GTR, as well as having released 19 solo albums. Downes graduated from Leeds School of Music in ‘75, making him the first member of Yes to graduate with a degree in music. Prior to joining Yes in ‘12, Davison toured with Sky Cries Mary.Their July 12 appearance at the NYCB Theatre at Westbury is to promote their latest release, Heaven and Earth, which is slated for a July 21 release.For more information, visit our NYCB Theatre at Westbury page in The Island Ear.–Nick Crispinolast_img read more

Berger urges Cordray to delay HMDA rule

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first_img continue reading » NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger yesterday urged CFPB Director Richard Cordray to approve a one-year delay of the effective date of its 2015 Home Mortgage Disclosure Act rule.Berger emphasized the importance of giving credit unions more time to implement the new provisions, and he urged that the effective date be delayed to Jan. 1, 2019.“The Bureau’s pending proposal to ‘fix’ various issues within the HMDA Final Rule is a step in the right direction,” Berger wrote in a letter to Cordray. “Credit unions appreciate measures taken by regulators intended to correct errors and offer additional clarifications … That being said, no amount of 11th hour tinkering with technical amendments can offset the tremendous burden being hoisted upon credit unions and their vendors as a result of the Final Rule.”“As we continue to inch toward the fixed effective date, NAFCU has heard increasing levels of concern from credit unions and their vendors over preparations for the Final Rule,” Berger added. “In order to facilitate a smooth transition to the new HMDA requirements, it is critical that credit unions and their vendors are provided enough time to ensure they are adequately prepared before the ultimate effective date.” 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Photo finish: End of an era as Olympus sells camera division

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first_imgIt’s the end of an era: Japan’s Olympus said Wednesday it is selling its struggling camera division to focus on medical equipment — now the major portion of the storied firm’s business.Olympus has been in the camera business since 1936, when it launched a product using the “Zuiko” lens, but it has struggled along with industry rivals as demand for traditional cameras declines, with consumers relying on increasingly sophisticated smartphone cameras.The company said it has signed a memo of understanding to transfer its camera business to investment fund Japan Industrial Partners, with the goal of sealing a final deal by the end of September. Olympus has, however, seen success in the medical equipment field, controlling a whopping 70 percent share of the global endoscope market.The firm’s decision comes as many of its domestic, traditional rivals including Fujifilm and Canon also aggressively expand in the medical equipment sector, under pressure from the same decline in camera sales. Topics :center_img The value of the sale was not specified.The firm has produced a number of famous products, including the half-size camera Olympus Pen, the world’s first micro-cassette tape recorder Zuiko Pearlcorder, and the Olympus OM-D series, a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera.The company said it had tried to cut costs and develop profitable, high-end lenses to survive in an increasingly difficult digital camera market.”Despite all such efforts, Olympus’s Imaging business recorded operating losses for three consecutive fiscal years up to the term ended in March 2020,” the company said.last_img read more

Teekay shuttle tanker takes Draugen load

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first_imgThe Norwegian oil company OKEA has informed that a Teekay shuttle tanker has recently unloaded 855 628 bbls of oil from the Draugen field in the Norwegian Sea for OKEA and Neptune.OKEA, which bought Shell’s entire 44.56% interest in Draugen field and 12% interest in Gjøa in Norway for NOK 4.5 billion ($525M) in November 2018, said that Teekay’s shuttle tanker Grena Knutsen unloaded 855 628 bbls of oil from the Draugen field on June 25.OKEA holds 729 769 bbls of this cargo which is sold to Shell Trading.The next unloading is planned for July 25 and will be a Petoro cargo which is traded by Equinor, OKEA said on Tuesday.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

Marriage and govt don’t mix, says vicar

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first_imgWairarapa Times-Age 25 August 2012The Government should butt out of trying to determine what marriage is, a Greytown minister says. “My personal view is [that] I look at things from a spiritual perspective,” St Luke’s Anglican Church vicar Andy Eldred said. “I know we live in the real world but I don’t really feel that people, or for that matter governments, or anyone really has the right to determine what marriage is.” Mr Eldred said the official church position was that marriage was between a man and a woman. “We haven’t really changed that position.” Mr Eldred said a civil union provided all the legal rights. He openly welcomed gay people into his church. A conservative group within the Presbyterian Church has urged Parliamentarians to reject the same-sex marriage bill next week, dismissing the views of other Presbyterians who support the bill as “isolated voices”.http://www.times-age.co.nz/news/marriage-and-govt-dont-mix-says-vicar/1518156/last_img read more