Category Archives: jfxkm

On the mechanism of crustal block rotations in the Central Andes — Comment

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first_imgIn this paper Beck (1998)reviews the database of palaeomagnetically observed rotations in the Andean margin of South America, in particular with respect to the well known change in sense of rotation linked to the Arica deflection (Bolivian Orocline) in the orogen. The paper argues firstly for the latitudinal distribution of rotations supporting an interpretation that distributed shear combined with oroclinal bending is the best hypothesis to explain the observed pattern of rotations and secondly that this rotation/deformation is time-dependent. While we essentially agree with the former conclusion we would define it more tightly in that the over-arching control on the pattern of rotations is a combination of differential shortening, as opposed to oroclinal bending, along the orogen coupled with distributed shear across the orogen. Our main concern with this paper is that it fails to provide a convincing demonstration that there is a time-dependent element to the magnitude of rotations. Primarily we will argue that it is far from clear from the palaeomagnetic data presented that there is a case for a continuous rate of rotation applicable to the southern limb of the orocline, at least. Not withstanding this we would also argue that geologically the deformation cannot and should not be described by a continuous deformation rate over time, as postulated. We also make specific points about aspects of the paper dealing with the Atacama Fault Zone and its relation to the observed rotations.last_img read more

Uncommon coinage

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first_imgAmong the Harvard Art Museums’ vast treasures is a miniature work that marked a murderous coup.Minted in the Roman Republic in 43‒42 BCE, the small silver coin features the head of Marcus Junius Brutus on one side, and two daggers, a hat often worn by a freed slave, and the Latin words Eid Mar (“Ides of March,” in English) on the other. It was struck by Brutus, who, along with several other members of the Roman Senate, stabbed the Roman dictator Julius Caesar to death on March 15, 44 B.C. Caesar’s assassination set off a scramble for power that would ultimately spell the end of the Roman Republic and inaugurate the Roman Empire under the reign of his adopted son and heir, Octavian, known to history as the Emperor Augustus.The imagery on the piece is unmistakable and “very powerful,” said Carmen Arnold-Biucchi, who recently retired after almost two decades as the museums’ first curator of ancient coins. During her tenure, Arnold-Biucchi helped bring roughly 2,000 other pieces to Harvard, small-scale works of art adorned with mythical creatures, ancient architecture, biblical references, important people, and poignant dates. Her acquisitions are key historical artifacts that augment the museums’ collection of more than 20,000 Greek, Roman, and Byzantine coins. In some cases, in fact, they are among the few existing remnants of parts of the past.Arnold-Biucchi was teaching a seminar in Hellenistic coins several years ago when a student mentioned his interest in seeing the Greek world from another perspective. “Suddenly, I realized that we have very few ancient Jewish coins, which are extremely important,” she said, “because there are so few material documents for Jewish history left.” Arnold-Biucchi filled that gap by acquiring coins from the Hasmonaean and Herodian kings, from the first and the second Jewish revolts (under Titus and under Hadrian), and other coins connected to ancient Jewish life.The Swiss Italian native said she isn’t entirely sure what drew her to study classical archaeology, a field that includes coins, while she was a student at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. Languages or medical school didn’t appeal to her, but history, and the study of ancient, tangible objects, did. And coins, which she eventually gravitated toward, were some of the most tangible artifacts around. Denarius of L. Plaetorius Cestianus for Brutus, Moving Mint. Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Bequest of Frederick M. Watkins Related An unanticipated juxtaposition Radcliffe fellow heads a team helping preserve the ancient city of Nicomedia in modern-day Turkey center_img Uncovering an ancient world “Coins were meant to circulate and to be touched,” said Arnold-Biucchi, whose position was endowed as the Damarete Curatorship of Ancient Coins in 2009. Before arriving on campus in 2002 she spent 18 years at the American Numismatic Society in New York City. At Harvard she has organized, cataloged, and digitized the collection and promoted coins as important windows to history, teaching in the Department of the Classics and at the Harvard Extension School, and always engaging students directly with the collection. “They are among the few types of objects in the museum that people can touch,” said Arnold-Biucchi, “and that is very powerful. So when I teach, I always teach with the coins.”Also powerful is the fact that coins can shine a very distinct light on history. Created by the state, ancient coins often carry important information about a society’s economy, political history, trading patterns, culture, religion, and rulers through their images, materials, and the technologies used to create them. And because they were created in bulk — one pair of dies, notes Arnold-Biucchi, could strike 20,000 coins — and made from durable materials, they survive in large numbers. They also often contain information that ties them to a specific period or even an exact date, said Arnold-Biucchi,who calls them “original works of ancient sculpture in miniature.” Among her favorites at the museums is the dekadrachm of Akragas from the end of the fifth century B.C. Only 10 are known to exist, and Harvard’s is the only one in the U.S. Roughly the size of a silver dollar, it is one of the largest denominations of ancient coinage (originally worth 10 drachmas, the standard unit of Greek coinage) and its detailed engraving renders it an artistic tour de force. On one side two eagles peck at a hare (the eagle is a mark of Zeus), on the other a naked youth drives a four-horse chariot.,“Most of the coins of Sicily have a four-horse chariot with a victory on top,” said Arnold-Biucchi who noted the dekadrachm would most likely have been used to pay high-ranking military men. But the coin’s imagery didn’t honor a political victory, she added. “The Sicilian tyrants of the fifth century B.C. were very wealthy, so they would send their chariots to compete at the games of Olympia.”Arnold-Biucchi said she leaves Harvard inspired by her years at the museums, by her colleagues, and by a message from the University’s recent commencement speaker, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who encouraged her listeners to embrace change. Near the end of her address in May Merkel told the crowd gathered in Tercentenary Theatre: “I believe that time and time again we need to be prepared to keep bringing things to an end in order to feel the magic of new beginnings.”“I will do that too,” said Arnold-Biucchi.The Harvard Art Museums has more than 150 coins on display in the ancient art galleries on the third floor. Online visitors can explore the coin collection via the museums’ website. Harvard Art Museum curators challenge expectations with new art pairinglast_img read more

Alum advances dialogue

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first_imgA Notre Dame graduate who now works as Michigan’s Superintendent of Public Instruction spoke Tuesday about education reform and the progress he has encouraged during his tenure. Michael Flanagan’s talk “Education Reform-Mongering: A Practitioner’s Perspective” in Carole Sandner Hall was the latest event in the Notre Dame Forum 2011-12: Reimagining School. Flanagan said the most pressing challenge for today’s educators is addressing the needs of the urban and poor. Sharing his experience of growing up in a working class family on Long Island, N.Y., he said education plays a critical role in realizing one’s potential. “I think there’s a certain point that when you see other people believe in you, it changes your whole trajectory,” Flanagan said. Flanagan said his critical point was when he had to adapt to his new environment after his family moved from Brooklyn to Long Island.  Flanagan said when a teacher informed him he would be placed in the “89er” program, he assumed it meant he was going to “be put on the short bus” because he was a troublemaker. However, he said it turned out to be the opposite ­— a program for talented eighth graders who would be given ninth grade work.  “It taught me a lesson that so much of this [education] is about expectations that you have for every child, and that almost without exception they can reach great heights if we believe in them,” Flanagan said. While it is important to believe all kids can learn, Flanagan said change cannot be conceptualized until we begin to act on an individual level.  “You have to be careful to design reforms that don’t make you feel good about all [the children, and in the process] forget to reach down to every child,” he said.  Even after 30 years as a local, regional and state superintendent, Flanagan said he continues to act on the lesson he learned early on in his career when he examined a particular district: the need to improve the quality of education is more important than what people want to hear.  “Overall, they were high achieving, but they didn’t look at individual schools,” he said. “I said that I bet we’re just like everyone else, that we’re losing women in science by high school.” When he brought his findings to public attention, the reactions were far from positive, he said.  “The headline the next day didn’t help me: ‘New superintendent comes to town, girls test scores go down,’” Flanagan said. “That and the reaction taught me a real lesson that you have to be willing to realize that change is easier said than done, that you have to confront the status quo.” Flanagan said one of his most recent pushes for reform has been to raise the “cut scores,” or the cut-off score that students have to attain on standardized tests to be considered at grade level, which encourages greater achievement in Michigan schools.  “All we did was raise the bar, and even though fewer kids could jump over that bar, we saw that they all ended up jumping higher than they did before,” he said. Flanagan said his other goals include providing free ACT testing to all Michigan students, improving reading proficiency levels, establishing tenure procedures that protect teachers and require achievement and developing ways to address the varied needs of Michigan’s children. The Notre Dame graduate said at times, critics have targeted his Catholic faith.  “I’m very concerned with determining what’s right for the kids, and I know that some of this process is painful for the adults involved,” Flanagan said. “I know that’s part of the job.” Fr. Tim Scully, director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives at the Center for Social Concerns, said this is due to Catholicism’s clearly defined positions on these contentious issues. “Unlike some religions, we have a social teaching, that for example, takes a position in regards to parent choice. All parents should have the opportunity to choose a decent school for their kids,” Scully said. “Because this tradition has this teaching, it implies a certain stake in the ground in debates.” Surprisingly, Flanagan said the economic downturn in Michigan helped them to enact these reforms.  “We wouldn’t get some of these reforms and innovations if we had enough money where we could just keep throwing money [at problems,]” Flanagan said. “[It’s not] that money makes no difference, but … you almost have to use it as an excuse to revamp the whole system.” Scully said Flanagan’s speech continued the Forum’s focus on broad development in education reform.  “I think Mike Flanagan is an example of a leader who has entered into a really contended field and has made a difference because of his deep empathy,” Scully said. “We hope that the people here today will leave asking questions, and at a Catholic university these questions are exactly the kind of questions that we ought to be raising.”last_img read more

Claybourne Elder & Elizabeth A. Davis Will Star in Allegro Off-Broadway

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first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 14, 2014 Allegro was Richard Rodgers’ and Oscar Hammerstein II’s third collaboration and first premiered on Broadway in 1947. The musical chronicles nearly four decades in the life of an Everyman, Joseph Taylor Jr. (Elder), from cradle through a mid-life discovery of who he is and what his life is truly about. The saga takes us from Joe’s birth through his childhood, from college dorm to marriage altar, and on to his career; from the tranquility of his small Midwestern hometown to the hectic din of big city life. Joining Elder as Joseph Taylor Jr. and Davis as Jenny Brinker will be George Abud as Charlie Townsend, Alma Cuervo as Grandma Taylor, Tony nominee Malcolm Gets as Joe Taylor Sr., Maggie Lakis as Hazel, Megan Loomis as Beulah, Paul Lincoln as Brook Lansdale, Jane Pfitsch as Emily, Randy Redd as Dr. Bigby Denby, Ed Romanoff as Ned Brinker and Jessica Tyler Wright as Marjorie Taylor. The production will feature scenic design by Doyle, costume design by Ann Hould-Ward, lighting design by Jane Cox and sound design by Dan Moses Schreier. Related Showscenter_img View Comments Allegro Claybourne Elder (Bonnie & Clyde) and Tony nominee Elizabeth A. Davis (Once) will star in the previously announced Classic Stage Company production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Allegro. Directed by Tony winner John Doyle, the production will play a limited off-Broadway engagement November 1 through December 7. Opening night is set for November 19.last_img read more

A. Wayne Roberts joins Champlain College as senior project consultant

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first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Champlain College President David F. Finney and Lynne Ballard, dean of Champlain’s Online and Continuing Education Division, announced today that A. Wayne Roberts will join the College as a senior project consultant.The recently retired president of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce, Roberts will work directly with the Workforce Development Center at Champlain College to provide financial and marketing consulting as the center launches new adult learning opportunities for the Vermont business community and beyond. Additionally, Roberts will assist in developing new strategic alliances for the College, also targeted to working professionals and their employers.For 20 years, Roberts served as Chamber president in Burlington and recently retired in October. Before his Chamber career, Wayne worked in Washington, D.C., in a variety of high-ranking government positions within the Reagan administration, and he owned several hospitality businesses in Jeffersonville, Vt. Wayne was also a tenured assistant professor in management at Johnson State College, where he helped build a business management program. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Babson College and MBA from University of Massachusetts.”I have been impressed with Wayne’s creative entrepreneurial spirit and business acumen and the College will benefit greatly from his experience as a business leader,” said President Finney.Ballard shared President Finney’s enthusiasm by commenting, “Wayne’s expert, no-nonsense approach will help us launch new initiatives with confidence and in a short timeframe that will truly address the needs of employers.” Champlain College prides itself on having close connections with the business community, preparing its students for career change or advancement, and delivering education that is relevant and experience-based.Champlain College’s Workforce Development Center was established in January 2006 to bring leadership to initiatives that include: delivery of professional education to high-priority industries in the form of new master’s degrees, bachelor’s degrees or professional certificates to meet the needs of a knowledge-intensive, highly skilled workforce; strategic partnerships that connect companies and individuals to educational and training opportunities; and collaboration with economic development partners to create an attractive environment for creative entrepreneurs to stay in Vermont and grow their businesses.For more information about the Workforce Development Center at Champlain College, visit www.champlain.edu/workforce(link is external) or contact Melissa Hersh at (802) 865-5402 and [email protected](link sends e-mail).last_img read more

Chenango County reports decline in mandatory and precautionary quarantine numbers

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first_imgThe Chenango County Health Department said that as of Saturday, there are 60 positive cases. On Friday, the health department reported a total of 55 positive cases. That shows an increase of just five cases in 24-hours. The Chenango County Health Department says there have been a total of 315 tests, with 29 additional individuals tested on Saturday. (WBNG) — The Chenango County Health Department gave an update on the latest information regarding the coronavirus on Saturday. While the number of positive cases has increased, the health department has reported a decline with individuals in mandatory and precautionary quarantine. The health department says the number of active hospitalizations has remained the same since Friday at nine. They also reported one additional recovery, bringing that number up to 13.center_img For more information, go to the Chenango County Health Department’s website. On Friday, they said there were 313 individuals in mandatory quarantine and 74 individuals in precautionary quarantine. Saturday’s numbers look much different with 244 individuals in mandatory quarantine and 46 individuals in precautionary quarantine, bringing those numbers down by 69 and 28. For more coronavirus coverage, click here.last_img read more

Cap&Reg joins Pillar in Glasgow site acquisition

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first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

NZ gets ‘D’ ranking for treatment of children

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first_imgOneNews 12 February 2014Children continue to be violently and sexually assaulted at alarming rates with a 68% increase in reported cases in the last five years.The Salvation Army’s State of the Nation report is out today and it makes for grim reading.Child poverty and abuse are two of the key problem areas identified in the report which is designed to provide a broad snapshot of New Zealand’s social progress over the past five years.The report found a huge increase in the number of recorded offences of violence and sexual assault against children between 2008 and 2013.Over the last five years, recorded assaults on children doubled from 1,328 to 2,667 offences, while recorded sexual offences against children rose 43%.http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/nz-gets-d-ranking-treatment-children-5829685last_img read more

Opinion: Seymour shuns submitters on end-of-life bill

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first_imgNZ Herald 7 May 2018Family First Comment: Excellent op-ed from Simon O’Connor“Seymour must be convinced that no one will ever be coerced into dying for the convenience or financial gain of another. He obviously believes no one in his family would ever encourage someone to end their life early so that the will could be read that much sooner. Indeed, it is tempting to think that of all families in New Zealand. However, we know that elder abuse is rampant, and that seniors, the sick, and the disabled are already marginalised in our society. Many feel unvalued and unwelcome, either through the deliberate actions of others or because of a prevalent unconscious bias. In the face of these and other concerns, it is unfortunate that Seymour has dismissed anyone not wholeheartedly supporting him as “fearmongering”. This is an injustice to the issue, to those who disagree with him, and to his own bill.”www.rejectassistedsuicide.nzA few weeks ago David Seymour dismissed tens of thousands of New Zealanders who wrote to Parliament with their concerns about his End of Life Choice bill.Submissions on his bill, which allows for euthanasia or assisted dying, have barely closed and he has already stated he doesn’t care what people have to say.Armed with a handful of polls that assure him of just how right he thinks he is on this issue, he has decided Parliament no longer needs to think for itself.The problem with relying on public polling to decide serious, complex social issues is that it inherently reduces the issue to a simple yes or no question. This is a dangerous way to address difficult subjects, especially when lives are at stake.Polling questions are not only simple, they are entirely dependent on the imagination of those polled. It is very easy to support just about any proposition if you are asked only about the idealised version in your own mind.While polls may indicate broad public support for the concept of “assisted dying”, the public has never been asked about the specifics. Supporting an abstract principle is very different from writing a law that will shape the real world.Assisted suicide, and this bill in particular, is a serious risk to many people in our society.Though Seymour is at great pains to remind everyone this bill advocates only voluntary euthanasia, we also know that many people are vulnerable to abuse, bullying and exploitation.READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/wanganui-chronicle/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503426&objectid=12046348last_img read more

FA Cup: Ajayi sees red as West Brom beat West Ham to fifth round spot

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first_imgRead Also: FA Cup: Iheanacho’s goal helps Leicester pip BrentfordThe changes had little impact as the Baggies continued to miss chance after chance. Before Semi Ajayi gifted the Hammers a route back into the game, when he was sent off with around 20 minutes to go for picking up two cautions.West Ham threw men forward and Noble should have equalised in stoppage time but fired over from 10 yards as Albion moved into round five. West Brom went into the lead in the 9th minute and despite going down to ten men with Ajayi’s sending off  they held off their Premier League opponents.Slaven Bilic made eight changes from the side that was beaten by Stoke City in the Championship on Monday, sticking true to his promise of rotation. Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreThe Best Cars Of All TimeHe Didn’t Agree With His Character Becoming Gay And Quit A RoleWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black Holes6 TV Shows That Got Better After A Major Character Had Left7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too Much7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny Super Eagles and West Brom defender Semi Ajay saw red against West Ham as ferocious Conor Townsend strike saw the Baggies to pip the Hammers  1-0 at the London Stadium, to move into the 5th round of the FA Cup. Loading… FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 It was a noticeably stronger travelling squad than the one sent to Charlton in round three, with a bench including the likes of Jake Livermore and Kyle Bartley. West Ham meanwhile made four changes, with David Moyes surprisingly opting for a strong team despite their Premier League struggles.Albion dominated right from the off and richly deserved their lead when Townsend smashed a strike across Darren Randolph before the 10 minute mark.  It could and should have been two before the break, Charlie Austin missing a glaring, headed chance as the first period wound down.After being roundly booed off at half time, Moyes rang the changes, with first teamers Mark Noble, Michail Antonio and Angelo Ogbonna coming.last_img read more