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ARDOVA PLC (ARDOVA.ng) Q12020 Interim Report

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first_imgARDOVA PLC (ARDOVA.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2020 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about ARDOVA PLC (ARDOVA.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the ARDOVA PLC (ARDOVA.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: ARDOVA PLC (ARDOVA.ng)  2020 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileARDOVA PLC formerly (Forte Oil Plc) sources and markets petroleum products in Nigeria which includes fuels, production chemicals, lubricants, greases and power generation for automobiles, aircraft, machines and equipment. The Fuel division supplies white petroleum products, aviation turbine kerosene and Jet A-1 aviation fuels; the Upstream division supplies ancillary products for the exploration and production sub-sector of the oil and gas industry; retail and industrial products include lubricants and grease; organic and petro-chemicals; premium motor spirit, automotive gas oil, dual purpose kerosene and fuel oils. Forte Oil Plc also has business interests in power generation through the 414MW Geregu power plant located in Kogi state. Established in 1964 and formerly known as African Petroleum Plc, the company changed its name to Forte Oil Plc in 2010. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. ARDOVA PLC is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Virtual babysitters are here to give isolated parents a break

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first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate The Anatomy of Fear From The Hustle Life in quarantine is stressful for everyone. For parents who work from home, closed schools and daycare centers add an anxiety-inducing question to the mix: How the heck am I supposed to get a moment’s peace if the kids have to be entertained all day long?Virtual sitters are Zooming to the rescueVideo conferencing really is for everything these days, and child care is no exception. The Washington Post reports that entrepreneurs are spinning up virtual services to lend struggling moms, dads, and kids a hand:A stay-at-home mom in Boston who has 4 kids launched SitterStream, where parents can book virtual sessions for 30 or 60 minutes at a time (at $15 and $22 a pop).The CEO of SitterCity told Forbes that demand for virtual services has risen 700% recently. SitterCity’s site is running a promotion that cuts the monthly fee for new members in half.The new tools aren’t meant to replace in-person sitters of old, who might tag in when the adults needed help for longer periods — like date night, the old-fashioned tradition of 2 months ago.But even a little help can make the 2nd shift easierEven in the Better Times, child care and the chores that make up domestic life (laundry, grocery shopping, etc.) fell more heavily on the shoulders of women. The New York Times wrote about how the pandemic has only made those disparities worse.Women also work disproportionately in industries that have been decimated by the virus, like health care and hospitality.Though they may offer temporary relief — or at least enough time to fire off a few emails — virtual-sitter services do come with some unique challenges. Like reeling the kids back in when they stray too far from the camera. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply KID-TAINMENT TAGSCOVID-19entertainmentParentingResourcesThe HustleVirtual Babysitters Previous articleCity of Apopka announces drive up coronavirus antibody test: Starting Monday, May 4Next articleRe-Opening Apopka: Restaurants taking different approaches to ‘Stage One’ Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Brisbane City Courtyard House / Kelder Architects

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first_imgManufacturers: James Hardie Australia, James Hardie, Lysaght, Modinex, PGH Bricks, AWS Structural Engineer: ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/896830/brisbane-city-courtyard-house-kelder-architects Clipboard AD Structure, Adrian Dine Developer/Builder:Natural Life Style HomesCity:BrisbaneCountry:AustraliaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyText description provided by the architects. The project was designed for a builder/developer client, it is a one-off custom designed home. The new courtyard house design replaced a 1960’s brick & tile house, the original house had one redeeming feature; a breeze block screen to the street. This has been recycled into the new design, and also inspired the design direction of the new build to reference the Mid-Century period, particularly the classic examples of homes built in Palm Springs in Southern California during this period. Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographySave this picture!Ground Floor PlanSave this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyThe developer wanted an exciting and liveable family home that would make the most of the site and location. Taking into consideration the location of the existing tree’s, the sites orientation, topography and Brisbane’s sub-tropical climate. It needed to be open to the outdoors and be centered on indoor/outdoor living. The new house sits on a sloping 582sq.m block in the inner-city Brisbane suburb of Auchenflower, about 4km from the CDB. Auchenflower is known for its character filled, leafy – hilly streets that are lined with Brisbane’s traditional style, ‘timber & tin’ Queenslanders.Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyBrisbane city council classifies Auchenflower as a Traditional Building Character area. Any new development must be sensitive to the character of the predominant pre-1946 or earlier homes in the area. This is aimed at preserving the ‘traditional character of the locality’. To build a contemporary home in Auchenflower is difficult as council’s guidelines are very restrictive and need to be creatively and skilfully negotiated. In this instance, it was difficult to reconcile the aspirational modernist mid-century aesthetic with the predominant contextual aesthetic of the traditional Queenslanders in the area.Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyThe challenge for us was to design a contemporary home that would also respectfully appropriate the traditional character of the locality. The planning constraints worked in our favor as it forced a development of the design and an approach that may not have naturally occurred without it. The result is that the design of this home uniquely responds to its place in the city of Brisbane and the client’s desire to reference Mid-Century design. A clash of ideas that made for a much more interesting and layered response.Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyAt the upper level, the house is weatherboard and fibro clad, much like the Queenslanders in the area and instead of a breezeblock screen to the street (strictly prohibited by BCC in this instance), 2 veranda’s flank the entry, screened with lightweight timber battens, providing privacy and filtering the western sun. The lower level of the house is brick, anchoring it to the site and clearly differentiating the upper and lower levels, another characteristic of the Queenslander. The long horizontal proportion of the upper level sits atop the brick base and appears to cantilever across half the site from the retaining wall that divides the front of the site.Save this picture!Upper Floor PlanThe house is capped with a low pitch tin roof that diminishes to a fine, low and long fascia line across the front of the house, this further enhances the designs horizontality and the fine mid-century lines and proportions. The house is centered around a landscaped, north facing courtyard that includes a pool. A somewhat radical departure from the normal block configurations in the area and the BCC preferred planning model, typically being a house in the center of the block, with generous front and rear setbacks. Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyAll the ground floor living areas fold around the central courtyard and open out to it. The courtyard provides many benefits for the home; bringing northern light and breezes into the interior all day, it is a wonderful, protected landscape for the living areas to open onto, outdoor family life and activities are central to the home and very much connected to the interior, a must for life in Brisbane. Most importantly, the house has a centralized outlook that cannot be built out or blocked. Creating the courtyard was like taking the traditional backyard and wrapping the house around it, so the occupants can effectively live in much closer proximity to it and get much more liveable interaction out of it and have complete control over their primary outlook.Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyThe designs response to the shape of the site created some interesting angles in the house and the sites steep topography demanded the design respond with a dynamic interplay of levels. The flow of the house steps down from the street level to entry level and then down again to the heart of the home, the central courtyard and the key living areas around it. The house has a gross floor area of 400sqm, so it is on the larger side, however, it sits on the site in a very unimposing way as the house is cut into the site, retaining a single story at the street level and stepping down the site to reveal its full height. Basically, this means that what is, in reality, a large house presents itself to the street as a smaller, more approachable and generally nicer little house.Save this picture!© Angus Martin PhotographyProject gallerySee allShow lessBroadway Malyan to Design an Expansive “Health City” in BrisbaneArchitecture NewsMarquise / MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANYSelected Projects Share Lead Architects: Architects: Kelder Architects Area Area of this architecture project 2018 “COPY” Save this picture!© Angus Martin Photography+ 55Curated by María Francisca González Share Brisbane City Courtyard House / Kelder Architects Year:  Brisbane City Courtyard House / Kelder ArchitectsSave this projectSaveBrisbane City Courtyard House / Kelder Architects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/896830/brisbane-city-courtyard-house-kelder-architects Clipboard ArchDaily Photographs CopyHouses•Brisbane, Australia Australia Wesley Kelder, Joel Kelder Photographs:  Angus Martin Photography Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Projects Area:  400 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Houses “COPY” CopyAbout this officeKelder ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcreteBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesBrisbaneAustraliaPublished on June 27, 2018Cite: “Brisbane City Courtyard House / Kelder Architects” 27 Jun 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumRailing / BalustradesMitrexIntegrated Photovoltaic Railing – BIPV RailingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Surface: Nordic DécorWindowsAir-LuxSliding Window – CorneringWoodBruagRoom Acoustics – Interior Cladding PanelsSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Frequency® FL-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoInternal Walls – Trimoterm, Qbiss OneGlassSolarluxWintergarden – SDL Akzent plusSystems / Prefabricated PanelsInvestwoodCement Bonded Particle Board – VirocPaintKEIMMineral Paint in Hunters Point LibraryCabinetsburgbadMid-Height Cabinet – EssentoSignage / Display SystemsGlasbau HahnMuseum Display CasesMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Workers fight back against austerity

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first_imgThe capitalist ruling classes in countries all over the world are pressuring local and national governments to spend less on services like education, health care, public transportation, roads and water, and pay more attention to cutting wages and pensions. Resistance to these austerity policies is growing, as workers showed with major protests in Quebec, Ireland and Belgium.QuebecThousands of protesters marched through downtown Montreal, March 24.Quebec, nearly as big as Alaska, stretches from the western border of New York state to Newfoundland, far to the east of Maine. The major part of its 8 million people live in the cities of Montreal and Quebec, but some also inhabit remote, isolated parts like the Gaspé Peninsula and Côte du Nord.Some 50,000 university students all over this vast province have been on strike since March 23, after strike votes on their campuses. Fifteen thousand students marched in Montreal on April 3, defying the cops. Unions and community groups have held smaller protests.The Montreal protest marked the end of a day in which 133,000 students throughout the province walked out, even though the minister of education called on local campuses to expel student leaders.These protests and the strike have been called by the Association of Student Union Solidarity (ASSE).Two thousand five hundred union members formed a human chain around the National Assembly, Quebec’s parliament, on March 30 to mark the end of their contract. They want a 13.5 percent raise over the next three years, while the offer from Quebec’s government is two years of a salary freeze and a 1 percent raise each year of the next three.There was also a smaller picket line in front of a pediatric hospital in Montreal on April 1 since the government’s budget cuts are going to severely affect the services it provides.All these protests are pointing to and supporting the call for a provincewide general strike on May 1.IrelandUnder pressure from the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the Irish government has imposed a major increase in the amount it charges for water. Tens of thousands have gone to the streets in major protests over this charge ever since it was announced by Prime Minister Enda Kenny.The last protest took place on April 4 in Dublin, where up to 80,000 people — in a country of 5 million — came out to chant “Enda Kenny, not a penny!” and “No way, we won’t pay!”Memet Uludag of “People Before Profit” and the Irish Anti-Racism Network, spoke in the context of United Nations World Anti-Racism Day.“We say today water is a human right. Black and white, we will unite and we will fight. From Bolivia to Detroit to Greece, people have been fighting against cuts, against austerity.” (Irish Times, April 6)The government has said it won’t compromise, but some members of the Irish Parliament who spoke on April 5 were predicting that the parliamentary regime would fall over this issue.BelgiumThe Belgian government has announced it will raise the age of retirement from 65 to 67 years and change the way raises are calculated, which would cost each worker $22,000, or six months’ salary, over the course of her or his career.On March 30, both the Flemish-speaking (Flammond) and the French-speaking (Walloon) unions held a joint demonstration in Brussels against these austerity proposals. Both called for a general strike on April 22 against their employer, the government of Belgium.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Report about torture and arbitrary detention

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first_imgDifficulties of covering the human rights situation News NepalAsia – Pacific Human rights violations by the security forces News Organisation Nepal’s civil war has intensified since a truce was broken by the Maoists and a state of emergency was imposed in November 2001. The clashes between government forces (army, police and paramilitaries) and Maoist rebels have reached an unprecedented level of violence. With the king’s support, the government has declared war on “Maoist terrorism” while the rebels have relaunched their “people’s war.” At least 4,930 people died in this renewed violence between 26 November 2001 and 2 November 2002, according to the Nepalese human rights organisation INSEC (Informal Sector Service Centre). More than 3,960 were killed by the security forces.In September 2002, a fact-finding mission conducted jointly by Reporters Without Borders/Damocles Network and INSEC confirmed that civilians, including journalists and human rights defenders, have been hit hard by the state of emergency and people’s war. “The civilian population, especially the poorest, are caught in the crossfire between soldiers and Maoists,” INSEC general secretary Subodh Raj Pyakurel said. The testimony gathered by the mission confirmed that both sides are committing serious human rights violations. The Maoists attack civilians they accuse of supporting the state. They torture, mutilate and conduct summary executions, spreading a reign of terror. The army and police for their part are guilty of summary executions, the most serious forms of torture, and arbitrary detention. These human rights violations are carried out with complete impunity and violate Nepal’s laws and core international human rights treaties that have been signed and ratified by Nepal.Lokendra Bahadur Chand, the new prime minister appointed by the king, stated on 19 October that he wished to seek and negotiated and political way out of the conflict with the Maoists. But the road to peace is likely to be long.Reporters Without Borders and INSEC call on the United Nations, in particular UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Sergio Vieira de Mello, to respond to the gravity of the situation in Nepal by sending a fact-finding mission there as soon as possible and by intervening with both sides to request that the rights of the civilian population be respected. Nepal: RSF’s recommendations to amend controversial Media Council Bill Reporters Without Borders and the human rights organisation INSEC publishthe report of a joint investigation into violence and abuses by bothsecurity forces and Maoists against Nepal’s civilian population, especiallyjournalists. The two organisations call on the United Nations to protecthuman rights in Nepal, where basic rights are now seriously threatened. Receive email alerts Conclusions and recommendations “If they wanted to kill them, they could just put a bullet in their head. But instead, they prefer to break their arms or legs and leave them paralysed for life. To prolong their suffering.”This was the comment of Dr. Suresh Kanodia, the director of a private hospital in the southwestern city of Nepalgunj, who has treated several of the Maoists’s victims. “Torture and mutilation are the basis of the terror imposed by the Maoists in certain parts of the country,” said Subodh Raj Pyakurel of INSEC. Dozens of cases have been registered by human rights organisations. “Their torture destroys families. The man becomes useless and, above all, his injuries remind the other villagers that they should not oppose the Maoists,” another Nepalgunj doctor said.The fact-finding mission took the testimonies of eight persons in Nepalgunj who have been attacked by Maoist rebels. Dr. Jean Rivolet, a Damocles Network medical expert, examined the victims and confirmed the seriousness of their injuries.1. Khadak Bahadur Budha, 30,was attacked in his home in February 2002. After accusing him of having called on Maoists militants to surrender to the police, rebels tied his hands behind his back, dragged him outside, forced him to lie down with his legs over a stone, and used sticks to beat both legs. He was found unconscious, his hands still bound, apparently left for dead by the Maoists. Dr. Rivolet confirmed multiple, splintered fractures on the upper third of the left tibia and lower third of its outer condyle, and fractures on the upper third of the right fibula. The blows had also left scars on the victim’s arms, head and chest. Bahadur is currently been treated at Nepalgunj? main hospital at the Nepalese government’s expense. His family has had to leave their village. Dr. Rivolet said these fractures were the result of very violent blows and that the victim would never recover the use of his legs.2. Gir Bahadur, a farmer from Jamunia (Bardia district), has been in hospital since August as a result of being interrogated and tortured at night by a group of Maoists who accused him of being “the government spy” in his village. He has lost his hearing in his left ear, and he has a wound on his forehead, temporal-maxillary trauma on the left side, and rib cage trauma from being kicked in the chest. He and his family do not want to go back to their village for fear of further reprisals.3. Tikaram Rana, 26, from the village of Kunathari (Surkhet district), sustained fractures to the legs and a kneecap when tortured in June by Maoists who accused him of being an “army spy.” Dr. Rivolet found a clean break in the right leg, and a splintered fracture of the left leg that will have irreversible consequences. The Maoists placed his leg on a stone and struck it violently with the back of an axe.4. Ram Kumar Yadab is from Akalgharwa, a village in Bankey district that was briefly occupied by Maoist rebels in the second week of July although only about 10 kms from Nepalgunj, the country’s second largest military garrison. After summoning the inhabitants from their homes, the rebels selected a dozen young men. Some were shot dead. Yadab and three others were tortured and mutilated in the main square. Yadab’s legs were beaten with the back of an axe. Dr. Rivolet found multiple factures on both of his legs, above the knees. Jagadish Prasad Yadav, 35, was kicked in the head and sustained similar leg fractures as a result of which he has undergone several operations and has a plate in his right leg. He had a further operation because of a bone infection. Inder Prasad Yadav, 18, was also beaten with the back of an axe on his left leg, sustaining injuries that became gangrenous with the result that his leg had to be amputated.Dr. Rivolet was concerned by the post-traumatic condition of these Akalgharwa victims, who told the mission they did not know why the Maoists had mutilated them. News News November 15, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Report about torture and arbitrary detention June 8, 2020 Find out more RSF_en NepalAsia – Pacific to go further The slight improvement in the situation of press freedom seen in August and September is due to the lifting of the state of emergency and an unprecedented mobilisation by the Federation of Nepalese Journalists. The protests culminated with a collective hunger strike. At that point, the government agreed to establish an independent judicial commission to investigate violations of press freedom during the state of emergency. Made up of a former judge, a government representative, a security expert, a media expert and an FNJ representative, the commission is supposed to look into arrests, tortures and other abuses suffered by journalists.The FNJ for its part has established a monitoring committee to register all violations of press freedom. This committee has documented 136 cases of arrests of journalists by the security forces.The lifting of the state of emergency has been an encouraging sign for the process of restoringthe rule of law and the press has taken advantage of the new situation. The daily Kathmandu Post, for example, published a front-page interview with one of the Maoist chiefs in the Kathmandu valley on 5 September. One of the article’s authors, Kosmos Biswokarma, discussed it with Reporters Without Borders. “It would have been hard to publish this article during the state of emergency. Since it came out, we have received no threats from the security forces. On the other hand, the government has felt under pressure because the Maoist chief we met demanded the resumption of negotiations.”In the same way, the government did not react to a report on extrajudicial executions by the security forces that was published in the magazine Nepali. However, human rights organisations note that the privately-owned press is reluctant to publish information on violations by the army. “Their correspondents are terrified and are prevented from confirming our reports in the field, while some editors in Kathmandu censor information that is critical of the security forces,” INSEC General Secretary Subodh Raj Pyakurel said.It continues to be difficult for Nepalese journalists to report freely on the security situation in Nepal, especially on abuses by the security forces. The mission interviewed a dozen journalists on this subject, most of them national newspaper correspondents based in Nepalgunj.The city of Nepalgunj is Nepal’s second biggest military garrison and the headquarters of the army’s second-most senior army officer. Nonetheless, the army has held no press conference for the local news media since the start of November 2001, and it has no press service in this region, although it is the one most affected by the armed conflict. Only the officer in charge of military operations in the Surkhet district has been open to questions from journalists.Major Ajit Thapa has distinguished himself by the number of threats he has made against reporters and human rights activists in Nepalgunj. A young INSEC district representative, Vijaya Chand, was threatened with death by Thapa. “If you continue to publish reports against the army, I am going to cut off your hands and legs,” he told Chand in the presence of government representatives.Nepalgunj reporters who were questioned by Reporters Without Borders said they were unable to verify most of the information received from the security forces and human rights organisations. “Our field access is very limited,” the BBC’s stringer Sharad K. C. said. “The threats from the military make us fear for the worst if we go to investigate reports of abuses. We have ended up practising a large degree of self-censorship.” Major Thapa regularly calls journalists to threaten them after their newspapers publish articles he does not like. “He threatens us or summons us, and he is aggressive,” the correspondent of a Kathmandu daily said. “Of course, it is war, and we are ready to denounce Maoist terrorism, but it is virtually impossible to cooperate with the army,” said the correspondent of the state-owned news agency RSS.In July, for example, the Maoists attacked a village near Nepalgunj. Journalists went there the next day and found that the army had not intervened until three hours after the attack, although it has several bases nearby. Most of the national dailies reported this, including the Space Time Daily. Major Thapa summoned the newspaper’s correspondent Krishna Adhikari the same day and demanded that he get a correction published. The reporter complied, for fear of being arrested.The Nepalgunj journalists voiced their frustration with the constraints placed upon them. “The army and government have nothing but contempt for provincial journalists and yet we are the ones who are close to what is going on,” the BBC stringer said. “What’s the good of reporting from the field if our editors in Kathmandu just reproduce the communiques put out in the capital by the Ministry of Defence,” he asked. “Sure, we make mistakes, but the sanctions are always applied in an arbitrary and violent fashion,” said the reporter, who was himself detained for several hours by the army earlier this year.The reporters are critical of the army’s policy of non-communication.”People say, if the army says nothing about the operations, it’s because it has something to hide,” Nepal Television’s correspondent said. The journalists propose that the army put an officer in charge of press relations in each region.While most of the reporters have not received threats from the Maoists, they fear the rebels’ reactions especially as they become more desperate. “Ever since they abducted two journalists and killed a third, we have become more wary,” the RSS correspondent said. The Nepal Samatapatra Daily’s correspondent has been threatened by a Maoist leader in the region. “I had reported his death in my newspaper on the basis of information supplied by the army,” the young journalist said. “He threatened me with reprisals if I continued reporting the death of rebel chiefs.” Under Chinese pressure, Nepal sanctions three journalists over Dalai Lama story Recommendations: restore the rule of law and compensate victimsReporters Without Borders and INSEC recommend that UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Sergio Vieira de Mello should:- summon Nepal’s ambassador to the UN Commission on Human Rights to remind him of his country’s commitments as regards protection of human rights;- ask the government of Nepal to present as soon as possible the reports on the situation in Nepal required under the international human rights instruments which it has ratified;- organise a fact-finding mission to Nepal led by the commission’s special rapporteurs for torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as a representative of the commission’s working group on enforced or involuntary disappearances;- denounce the acts of violence by the Maoist rebels against civilians.- establish a permanent office of the UN High Commission for Human Rights in Nepal. Human rights violations by the Maoists a. Arbitrary detentionThe security forces arrested several thousand persons suspected of being Maoist militants or sympathizers during the state of emergency that was in effect from November 2001 to August 2002. These arrests were carried out in an entirely unlawful manner and both suspects and their families were rarely given any official explanation.All sectors of the population were affected by the arrests, including more than 300 journalists. At least 10 journalists were tortured. Twenty-six journalists are still held in violation of judicial procedures. The detainees were not taken before a judge and the deadlines for their release (90 days under the anti-terrorist law) were not respected. The judicial authorities have remained silent, and have failed to defend the rights of the detainees. Acts of torture have been committed by both army personnel and police. The information presented below does not cover all of these violations and is given just as an illustration.More than 150 journalists arrested and detained illegallyThe interior ministry recognized for the first time on 4 September that 16 journalists were being detained in Nepal. This belated admission came as result of considerable mobilisation by journalist organisations, especially the FNJ. Nonetheless, it was only a partial admission. At the time of writing this report, at least 21 journalists and news media assistants were detained in Nepal. Most of them have been held for more than six months without the authorities initiating any form of judicial proceedings.On 5 November, Ishwor Chandra Gyawali (editor), Manarishi Dhital (office worker) of the pro-Maoist monthly Dishabodh, Deepak Sapkota (reporter), Dipendra Rokaya (editorial assistant), Dhana Bahadur Thapa Magar (photographer), all of the pro-Maoist weekly Janadesh, and Mina Sharma, editor of the monthly Aikyabaddata (Solidarity), were released by the government. Ram Bhakta Maharjan, a keyboard operator on the weekly Janadesh, was freed the previous day. This decision is due to a strong mobilisation of the FNJ.Jana Astha editor Kishor Shrestha was arrested twice during the state of emergency. The first time, he was arrested by the army in January over an article about the army chief of staff’s son. The second time was on 4 August, when police burst into Jana Ashta’s offices and took him to a police station in the city. Eight police officers, including a Superintendent Khanal and an Inspector Mainali, interrogated him for nearly two hours. They did not hit him, but one officer made as if to hit him and another spat on him. Finally, he was placed in a 4-by-3-metre cell which had no electricity and was already holding 20 others. He estimates that around 300 persons, most of them suspected Maoists, were being held in the police station. The guards were strict, and Shrestha was transferred three times to another cell for talking to fellow detainees.Jana Astha journalists Ambika Niraula and Dev Ram Prasad Yadav are still held by the security forces. After Niraula was arrested in January in Rajbiraj Saptari, the district administrator contacted his father to propose that he surrender his other son, a Maoist student leader, to the authorities in exchange for Niraula’s release. Jana Astha editor Shrestha went to see the then interior minister in July in an attempt to obtain the release of his two reporters. In his presence, the minister telephoned the government representatives in the districts where they are held in an attempt to find a solution to their prolonged detention. Despite the promises made, the two have not yet been released.Shrestha believes the security forces resent the fact that the two journalists reported the public demonstrations held by the Maoist rebels at the time that negotiations were under way between them and the government. “They are being held just for having covered the Maoists’ activities as journalists. Before the fighting resumed, these activities were fully authorised.”According to the information obtained by Reporters Without Borders, 21 journalists are still being held in Nepal, which makes it the world’s biggest prison for the press. Most of the detained journalists are being held for having worked for pro-Maoist or other far-left publications or for having covered the activities of the Maoist rebels. After several months of their being held in secret and subject to physical mistreatment, conditions of detention improved, especially for those in Kathmandu’s central prison. Journalist Om Sharma, for example, now receives regular visits from his wife. She told the mission: “He is in good health and his morale is high, but he cannot say much because a guard is always present when we meet.” Sharma is currently held in a cell with 11 other journalists.Examples of arbitrary detention in the Nepalgunj regionDuring a field visit to the Nepalgunj region, Reporters Without Borders and INSEC obtained information on a dozen cases of arbitrary arrest by the security forces, especially the army. In all these cases, the suspects were never informed in writing why they had been arrested. Their conditions of detention were harsh but they were not subject to severe forms of torture.1. Jitendra Mahaseth is the director of a private hospital in Nepalgunj. The army arrested him on 16 December 2001 on suspicion of having treated Maoists without reporting their presence to the authorities. He spent 21 days in the Chisapani barracks, a few kilometres from Nepalgunj. He told the mission he had not been mistreated but had never received any document from the security forces, which constitutes arbitrary detention. Since then, he has had to present himself at an army post every day and submit to questioning. He must also note the names and descriptions of all the patients he admits to his hospital. If any of them could be a Maoist or sympathiser who was wounded in a clash, he must alert the police under threat of further punishment. He has also been warned that old charges against him, dating back to 1985, could be revived if he does not cooperate with the security forces. At that time, he spent 13 months in prison because of his pro-democracy activities.2. In Banai Bhar village (Banke district), Dhania Chowdhury, 24, described how soldiers detained her husband Phul Raj Chowdhury on 13 August. “More than a dozen soldiers surrounded our house. Some came in, arrested my husband, calling him a Maoist, and searched the house. The soldiers grabbed me by the hair, dragged me into the bedroom and told me they would let my husband go if I agreed to have sex with them. I refused. They searched the bedroom and left with him.” The mother of two children aged three and six, she has not dared ask news of her husband at the Chisapani military camp. She assumes he was arrested on the basis of someone’s denunciation. “We gave food to Maoists two or three times, but we were forced to do so. We are poor peasants, not rebels.”Before leaving the village, the soldiers beat a 69-year-old resident known as Bharthari Chaudhari, who was examined by Dr. Rivolet a week after the events. He diagnosed the after-effects of shoulder bruising and a bruise to the back of the head. The soldiers also arrested Raj Bahadur Tharu, whom they accused of being a Maoist and of possessing arms. His wife, Rupa Tharu, the mother of a five-year-old boy, has had no news of him since his arrest. His father Khusiram Tharu was also beaten during the army raid. He testified that two soldiers stood on his back while a third struck him. He was unable to move for two days, and still complains of lumbar pans. Dr. Rivolet found scars and multiple bruising on the chest and lower back, as well as open sores on the back.3. Puspa Raj Lamechhne, 42, was detained arbitrarily for 20 days in the Chisapani barracks after being arrested in March in his village, Gabar, near Naubasta VDC-7. He was probably denounced by another person arrested by the army. He acknowledged having giving food to Maoists, but said he was forced to do so. He was held in a small cell with a dozen other suspects, mostly peasants and students. His wife was never allowed to visit him during his detention. Since his release, he has had to report once a week to the barracks, where soldiers question him about his activities.Another incident took place in the village of Gabar at the beginning of July. Three villagers were returning home from their fields at night when they were stopped by a military patrol. Two of them fled, but the third, Rajaram Tharu, who is handicapped, was unable to hide. The two who escaped heard the soldiers fire two or three shots. Thereafter, Tharu’s wife has received no word of him and his body has not been found. The day after this incident, soldiers went to the home of one of the two who had fled, Ram Prasad Tharu, 20. They arrested him and took him to the Chisapani barracks, where he was beaten with a bamboo stick during interrogation. He was released the same day.In this village alone (which has 700 inhabitants), a total of four civilians have been arrested since the state of emergency was declared, and a fifth has disappeared.4. Bhagwathi Prasad Chowdhari, 24, from the village of Chapargauthii (Kohalpur VDC-4), was arrested on 8 June when soldiers came looking for two other young villagers who went underground a few years ago. Accusing him of being a Maoist and of harbouring a network, they tied his hands behind his back and blindfolded him. They held him for 48 hours in the Chisapani military camp, keeping him blindfolded except when he ate or went to the toilet. He also had to remain with his hands tied behind his back. Officers slapped him in the face during interrogation sessions. All the detainees in his cell were hooded, and none of them dared speak for fear of being caught by the guards. Before releasing him, the soldiers told him they no longer thought he was a Maoist. Chowdhury claims that his vision has deteriorated since then. Dr. Rivolet found that he was very anxious about the idea of being rearrested.In the city of Nepalgunj alone INSEC has registered more than 200 arrests of civilians suspected of being Maoist activists or sympathisers. The overwhelming majority never received any official record of their detention. Furthermore, in almost all cases, the security forces require former detainees to regularly present themselves to a police post although they have not been charged. In the district of Rolpa, for example, at least 200 teachers must present themselves at least once a week to the security forces based in the main towns. For some of these teachers, this entails a round trip of several days. Finally, INSEC has registered no instance of the authorities initiating judicial proceedings against suspected Maoists in this region, although some of them have been held since the start of the state of emergency, that is to say, nine months.b. Use of torture by the security forcesIn the course of this fact-finding mission, Reporters Without Borders had access to a series of documents (photographs and testimonies) on cases of torture of suspected Maoists by the army and police.Several of these suspects died under torture. Kancha Dangol, a Congress Party activist in Tokha (Kathmandu district) who was mistakenly accused of being a Maoist, was tortured to death in March 2002. From photographs of her body, Dr. Rivolet was able to identify very large bruises that would have been caused by a blunt object such as a bat or a bar. He also identified pubic bruising, an oedema of the tongue and a nose fracture.Photographs of other victims showed various forms of torture: burns on the arms and legs, open head wounds with rupturing of the cranium, the marks of blows with metal objects, and large bruises to the forehead and temples. A doctor questioned by the mission said examination of individuals interrogated by the security forces had shown clears signs of such torture as repeated violent blows to the soles of the feet; forced submersion in water; electric shocks (especially to the genitals); and simultaneous blows to both sides of the head, causing partial deafness and sensory disorientation.Kathmandu-based organisations that defend human rights and assist victims told the mission they had received more than 100 torture victims since the start of the state of emergency. The situation of detainees in the police stations has improved slightly since June. Under national and international pressure, the government also created a unit within the army with responsibility for human rights in August. But army personnel suspected of violating basic human rights have not been subject to any sanctions.Nepal has nonetheless ratified the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, which entered into force in June 1987. Article 2 of this convention states that, “no exceptional circumstances whatsoever, whether a state of war or a threat of war, internal political instability or any other public emergency, may be invoked as a justification of torture.” Each state that is a party to the convention is also required to “ensure that all acts of torture are offences under its criminal law.” Reporters Without Borders and INSEC therefore call on the UN Committee against Torture to act quickly to obtain explanations from the Nepalese government about the information contained in this report.Press victims of tortureThe lifting of the state of emergency in August 2002 and the significant fall in the number of journalists arrested during July and August are encouraging signs for the defenders of press freedom in Nepal. But the death of Krishna Sen, the editor of a pro-Maoist publication, while in detention in May says a lot about the treatment reserved for opposition journalists and journalists who for whatever reason are suspected of links with the Maoist rebellion.Reporters Without Borders and Damocles Network concluded in a report published on 15 October that Sen probably died under torture on 28 May, eight days after his arrest, in an interrogation room of the Mahendra Police Club in Kathmandu. Among those thought to have been present at his death was Police Officer Bikram Singh Thapa, who was awarded the title of best officer of the year in October.The mission obtained the testimony of two journalists who were tortured while in detention. In the first case, the journalist was subjected to a violent interrogation with intermittent beatings. In the second case, the torture did not consist of physical violence. Kept blindfolded for 24 days, the journalist had to endure severe psychological torture.The case of Rewati SapkotaA young journalist with the Nepalese-language Rajhdhani Daily, Rewati Sapkota was arrested at his home in Kathmandu on 24 May by Police Inspector Kamal Manandhar. Police interrogated him for four nights and five days about other journalists and human rights activists, torturing him repeatedly. He told Reporters Without Borders: “my hands were tied with a piece of cord. So were my feet. I was blindfolded so that I couldn’t see my torturers. They would hit me very hard with bamboo sticks. They often laid me in the sun. Two policemen wearing boots would stand on my knees while another beat my legs or my feet. I couldn’t even cry out because I had a gag over my mouth (…) They only stopped torturing me when I fainted.” Sapkota shared a small, dirty cell with a dozen other persons. “All the detainees had bruises from where they had been hit,” he said.Sapkota was finally released thanks to international pressure and pressure from the Nepalese Federation of Journalists. Back at home, he had to recover in bed and could not walk for a week. After his release, he was obliged to go to the police post twice a week and each time answer a series of questions about his activities. Nowadays, Sapkota has to go to the police station once a month. “Four months after my arrest, I still have pains in my feet, nightmares, and the fear of being arrested again and dying,” said Sapkota, who as a journalist specializes in scientific subjects. “Worst of all, I don’t have any paper saying I was arrested.” Sapkota has no visible after-effects from the torture, but Dr. Rivolet noted pains in the knees, calves and soles of his feet and detected post-traumatic disorder.The case of Gopal BhudhatokhiThe editor of the weekly Sanghu, Gopal Bhudhatokhi has been arrested twice since the declaration of the state of emergency in November 2001. The first time, on 17 December 2001, about 50 police officers surrounded his home in Kathmandu and took him to the city’s main police station. He was held for more than 12 hours without food and water, and any blanket. Army officers interrogated him while he was blindfolded, questioning him about a cartoon that ran on the newspaper’s front page showing two persons asking what country Nepal could go to in order to buy arms. The officers also criticised the publication of an article by a political leader about the population’s loss of confidence in the royal family. Before releasing him, the army officers threatened him with reprisals if he published any more articles on the army or royal family.The second time was on 3 March, as he was leaving his office in the centre of Kathmandu. He had just completed the latest issue of the weekly and was going home by motorcycle. He had suspected that he was being followed all week. About 100 metres from his office, his way was blocked by a small truck and three motorcycles. A dozen individuals surrounded him and told him to go with them. “We are the army. Our officer wants to talk to you.” He was driven away in the back of the truck with his face covered and his hands tied behind his back. About an hour later he was placed in an cell with no ventilation and no light, and was kept in isolation, with his head hooded and his hands bound, for the next 24 days. He was allowed to remove the hood only when he ate or went to the toilet.The isolation plunged Bhudhatokhi into a “deep depression.” This is how he described the anxiety he suffered during his detention: “All the time, I was afraid I would go mad (…) I spent all day being frustrated. I’d become a nothing. No more telephone. No more contact with my wife and friends. Nothing (…) All the noises terrified me. The sound of the soldiers’ boots or the screams of the other detainees.” He was not beaten during interrogation but he regards the treatment he received as “the worst of tortures.” During the interrogation sessions, which were every day at first, the officers took him to task over an article on 23 February criticising the army chief of staff. “Why don’t journalists like you support the army,” they asked.Budhatokhi was released on 25 March as a result of national and international pressure. Since then he has had back and lower-back pain and discomfort in certain positions, and says his memory has been affected. “I have avoided going mad, but I have the impression that my brain is running at half speed.” Dr. Rivolet thought he was suffering from anxiety as a reaction to the torture. Conclusions: disregard for legalityWithin days of the proclamation of a state of emergency, lawyers presented habeas corpus petitions to the supreme court on behalf of colleagues and journalists. The petitions were received, but thereafter the supreme court justices have deferred judgement from month to month. None of the dozens of habeas corpus procedures has yet reached a conclusion. Either the judges have declared themselves incompetent, transferring the cases to a broader supreme court tribunal, or they have delayed decisions on the grounds of not having completed their deliberations.The authorities are obliged by law to bring a detainee before a judge within 24 hours of his arrest. If they do not comply, a lawyer may petition the supreme court for habeas corpus. The supreme court, especially Chief Justice, Keshav Prasad Upadhyaya, who escaped a Maoist ambush, has dragged its feet in these habeas corpus cases and has failed to fully play its role as check and balance to the executive.The authorities have also targeted the lawyers who tried to ensure that the rights of detainees were respected. Khim Lal Devkota, for example, a lawyer involved in defending jailed journalists, was himself detained by the Kathmandu police on 11 June. The authorities have on several occasions declined to produce Devkota before the supreme court. Due to heavy pressure from the Bar Association and a Supreme Court, he was produced before the court and released. But, the same day, plain clothe security personnel tried to arrest Mr. Devkota at his home. He was protected by human rights activists and he went into hiding. Another lawyer Raman Kumar Shrestha was arrested on 23 August.The government decided to place hundreds of individuals in custody, including journalists and human rights defenders. Nepal’s anti-terrorist law allows the authorities to hold these persons for three months. Thereafter, their detention may be extended by decision of any of the 75 district courts. Under the state of emergency, the authorities were required only to present “reasonable justifications” in order to get the detention extended. But the government and security forces chose to ignore the rules by failing to bring detainees before judges at the end of the legal detention period. The authorities also did not try to present evidence implicating any detainees in the Maoist rebellion. As a result, hundreds of persons are currently detained in Nepal in an utterly illegal manner. One more proof of this is the fact that those detained has not been given a written record of their arrest, detention or release. “I have no way of proving I was arrested,” the journalist Sapkota said. “It is my word against the army’s”.The Kingdom of Nepal must begin at once to respect its international undertakings in the area of human rights, in particular, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which has been ratified by Nepal. Reporters Without Borders and INSEC also call on the Nepalese government to ratify the Rome Statute creating the International Criminal Court. Follow the news on Nepal The Maoists target “journalist spies”The mutilated body of Nawaraj “Basant” Sharma was found on 13 August near the village of Suna in the western province of Karnali. According to a local journalist questioned by Reporters Without Borders, armed men kidnapped Sharma on 1 June from his home in Kalikot district. Identified as Maoist rebels, his kidnappers cut off his limbs, cut out his eyes and finally shot him in the chest. Since then, the rebels have been threatening his relatives and have prevented them from going to Kathmandu to collect the aid which the government gives to the families of the rebels’ victims. Sharma was the founder and editor of the weekly newspaper Karnali Sandesh (Karnali Message), since 1999 the only independent news media in the far west, Nepal’s poorest region. He was also president of the local branch of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists (FNJ) and the director of Kalikot school. He had previously been kidnapped by a Maoist group in February and held for nearly three months. Following his release in May, he was interrogated by the security forces for five days on suspicion of being a spy for the Maoists.Two other journalists have been kidnapped by the Maoists and one is still being held. Dhana Bahadur Rokka Magar, 33, a news presenter for state-owned Radio Nepal’s programme Kham (in the Magar language), was kidnapped on 1 August on the road from the Jaluke region to the town of Surkhet (in the west of the country). He was travelling in a bus that was stopped by Maoist rebels. They made him get out and go with them. At least five other passengers including an employee of the Gorkha Welfare Trust, a British NGO, were also abducted. In early September, the Maoists told other journalists that Magar was still alive and was being held in one of their camps. He is accused of being a government spy. According to some sources, Magar’s father was killed by the Maoists.Demling Lama, correspondent of Radio Nepal and the Himalaya Times national daily in the Sindhupalchok district (north-east of Kathmandu), was asleep in his home in Dhuskot on the night of 5 April when armed rebels burst in and took him away. He succeeded in escaping from his captors four days later and told an FNJ representative that they had beaten him. May 17, 2019 Find out more Nepalese journalists threatened, attacked and censored over Covid-19 coverage Help by sharing this information May 29, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

Newspaper editor jailed for six months

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first_img The conviction of Niger newspaper editor Moussa Aksar is an attack on investigative journalism News NigerAfrica Organisation News The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Follow the news on Niger May 11, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders today deplored the jailing for six months on 7 November of Mamane Abou, editor of the independent weekly paper Le Républicain, for supposedly libelling the country’s finance minister.”This conviction makes no sense, as he was simply doing his job,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard. “Nothing justifies such a heavy sentence either. Legal procedures were also not properly followed because he was tried in his absence while he was in Niamey prison.””His lawyers were not even told of the trial, which is evidently a political matter. The authorities sentenced him quietly without telling anyone. Niger claims to be a democracy that respects the rule of law but this is a very alarming violation of freedom of expression,” Ménard said, calling for the journalist’s release.Abou was also fined 300,000 CFA francs (450 euros) and ordered to pay 10 million CFA francs (€15,200) in libel damages. One of his lawyers, Oumarou Soulé, told Reporters Without Borders he was shocked by the failure to follow legal procedure and said he would immediately appeal again the sentence.Abou has been held in Niamey prison since 5 November accused of publishing confidential finance ministry documents showing that the finance minister had embezzled several billion CFA francs (more than €1.5 million). Niger: Two journalists arrested in disturbing setback for press freedom News Reports Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information RSF_en to go further NigerAfrica November 27, 2020 Find out more November 12, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper editor jailed for six months Mamane Abou, editor of the weekly paper Le Républicain, was sentenced to six months in prison in Niamey on 7 November for supposed libel. Reporters Without Borders condemned the arbitrary conviction and called for his release. July 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Dr. Valerie Wardlaw Appointed Interim Director of Public Relations for Pasadena City College

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first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment HerbeautyIt Works Great If Weight Loss Is What You’re Looking For!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeauty Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community Newscenter_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Education Dr. Valerie Wardlaw Appointed Interim Director of Public Relations for Pasadena City College By VALERIE WARDLAW, INTERIM DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS Published on Thursday, September 26, 2013 | 11:15 pm Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Pasadena City College announced the appointment of Dr. Valerie Wardlaw as Interim Director of Public Relations effective September 5, 2013.Wardlaw previously served as special projects consultant for the Pasadena City College Foundation.  In her new position, Wardlaw will direct public relations and marketing for one of the nation’s largest community colleges.  She is charged with overseeing media and communications strategies for the college.In announcing this appointment, Superintendent- President Mark Rocha said:  “Valerie’s leadership and strategic abilities makes her well-suited to develop comprehensive communications programs for PCC”.Dr. Wardlaw received her bachelor degree from Hampton University and graduate degrees from Temple University and Fuller Theological Seminary.  Wardlaw serves as a national Information and Communications committee member for Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., board of director and treasurer for the Pasadena Delta Foundation, chair of Technology for the Harbor Area Chapter of The Links, Incorporated and management team member of The Tournament of Roses, Formation Area.For more information, visit www.pasadena.edu. Business News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Limerick Marine Search and Rescue

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first_imgEmma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Marine Search Rescue 01 Marine Search Rescue 51 Marine Search Rescue 10 NewsLimerick Marine Search and RescueBy Bernie English – April 23, 2014 902 WhatsApp #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Marine Search Rescue 64 Marine Search Rescue 37 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Marine Search Rescue 41 13.04.14Limerick Marine Search and Rescue. Picture: Alan Place. Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch Linkedin Email Marine Search Rescue 13 Marine Search Rescue 26 Facebook Marine Search Rescue 30 Marine Search Rescue 19 TAGSmarineMusic Limerickrescuesearch Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Twitter AMID all the sophisticated communication equipment that greets a visitor to the Limerick Marine Search and Rescue base on the Dock Road, there is a little stack of leaflets offering information on a counselling service for families bereaved by suicide.Sadly, the leaflet reflects what the team of volunteers encounters all too regularly. A person who has been overtaken by despair, if even for a moment, goes to the river and the rescue  unit is scrambled.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up But if someone is in trouble, either by accident or design, the Limerick unit is one of the best prepared to get out there and help.The team is equipped and trained to the same standard as the professional coastguard service.They are on-call 24-7 and, when an emergency arises, they can be fully operational in under two minutes.There is a slipway just yards from the base which gives them instant access to the water and they have now put a boat on the Abbey River to deal with calls that end of the water.“We’re unique in that we know the river so well. An operation is a risk but it is a calculated risk,” explained rescue diver and coxswain John Broderick.Most of the calls are of sightings of people entering the water between Shannon Bridge and Sarsfield Bridge and by far the majority of emergencies happen between two and three am, “when the clubs empty out”, said dive supervisor Jimmy Connors.Once a call comes in, the first three people to reach the base – or the crew staying overnight in the station on-shift – will get a boat in the water, getting information as they go and beginning the search at the point where the person was last seen.The next person in will take over communications co-ordination and they are followed by another team that includes a swift water rescue swimmer and dive team.“The dive team goes in immediately if a person is not on the surface. If they have gone under, the best chance we have of recovery is if we find them quickly. We know the flow of the river. We go above the entry point and we search all the way down to where we know a person may go,” explained jimmy.If the person is not found straight away, then begins a highly professional operation which involves divers swimming in formation, roped together at arms length wearing special diving equipment.At the bottom of the river, visibility can be so low that the team can barely see in front of them. They are using their hands to sweep and feel for a body which may stuck in the deep, sticky mud at the bottom.They literally feel their way to finding a body which has often been in the water for a time.If a body is not recovered, searching may be scaled back “but we don’t give up. There are very few that we’ve never got. The longest time for a recovery was fifteen months,’ said Jimmy.All of the volunteers have been extensively trained but ‘rookie’ volunteers are not sent on expensive training courses immediately. First they learn everything there is to know about handling the boats.“They’re on probation for twelve months. We’ll see what commitment they give and watch their behaviour. But it’s only on an actual recovery that we know and they know if they are suited. We say you’re not a volunteer until your first recovery,” said Jimmy.On of the things the team is anxious to get across is their gratitude to the public and to others who support them.“We’re all volunteers so when we’re out there, rattling a bucket, ever cent that’s donated is ploughed back into the service. We couldn’t do what we do without the support we get,” said PRO Peter Hogan.“Nor could we do this without the support of our families. We are away so much and our families are putting up with that,” said John.But with all of the tragedy that goes with taking someone who has drowned out of the river, the team have many causes to celebrate.The volunteers take heart when they have a recovery that those who loved that person can have closure.“The buzz you get from a rescue is amazing,” said John.They team is clearly 100 per cent involved in what they do, regardless of the huge demands it makes on their time.“It’s in our blood,” said Jimmy. Marine Search Rescue 17 #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Print Previous articleNewsreel for Arts…Next articleSumo Cyco play Limerick’s Indie Week Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Advertisement Marine Search Rescue 03 woman rescued from Shannon River Marine Search Rescue 52 Marine Search Rescue 38 Marine Search Rescue 59 Two rescued from the water overnightlast_img read more

Detention center officer charged after reportedly assaulting wife

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first_img By admin – January 16, 2018 Previous articleTwo bridges closed east of MidlandNext articleMan charged with sexually assaulting five-year-old admin WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Twitter Local NewsCrime Malcolm Anders The Odessa Police Department charged an Ector County Sheriff’s Office detention center officer Friday morning after he reportedly pushed his wife down a stairwell and began strangling her.Officers responded to the incident around 2:34 a.m. Friday in the 1100 block of 51st Street, the probable cause affidavit said, where they made contact with 24-year-old Malcolm Anders and his common-law wife.His wife reportedly told police they got into a verbal argument which became physical when Anders pushed her down the stairwell in their residence. Anders then grabbed her by the neck with both hands and applied enough pressure to where she began to lose consciousness, the report stated.After hearing the woman’s story, and noticing the red marks around her neck, officers charged Anders with assault by strangulation, a third-degree felony, the report detailed.ECSO Spokesman Sgt. Gary Duesler said Anders was employed as a detention center officer at the Ector County Detention Center, and said he has been re-assigned to a position still in the detention center, but outside of the secured facility of the jail, pending further investigation. Duesler added he is still being paid.OPD Spokesman Cpl. Steve LeSueur said Anders was previously enrolled in the OPD police academy, working at OPD from February 2016 to November 2016 when he resigned, but was never a police officer and never graduated the police academy. LeSueur added Anders worked with animal control for a short time before resigning.Jail records show Anders was taken to the Ector County Detention Center Friday, and released the next day on a $15,000 bond. Pinterest Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Detention center officer charged after reportedly assaulting wifelast_img read more

Central Govt. Is Expected To Respect Languages Of All The States & Issue Notifications In Vernacular Language: Madras High Court

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first_imgNews UpdatesCentral Govt. Is Expected To Respect Languages Of All The States & Issue Notifications In Vernacular Language: Madras High Court Sparsh Upadhyay12 Dec 2020 9:52 PMShare This – xWhile noting that mere issuance of the notification in Hindi and English languages will not be sufficient, unless it is issued in the vernacular languages, the Madras High Court recently remarked that it is expected of the Central Government to respect the languages of all the States and comply with the procedures. The Bench of Justice N. Kirubakaran and Justice B. Pugalendhi was…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginWhile noting that mere issuance of the notification in Hindi and English languages will not be sufficient, unless it is issued in the vernacular languages, the Madras High Court recently remarked that it is expected of the Central Government to respect the languages of all the States and comply with the procedures. The Bench of Justice N. Kirubakaran and Justice B. Pugalendhi was hearing a writ petition challenging the gazette notification (dated 22.09.2020) issued by the Union Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Government of India reducing the size of the Kanyakumari Wild Life Sanctuary from 0-10 kms to 0-3 kms. The grievance of the Petitioner was that prior to the issuance of this gazette notification, a draft notification was issued by the Union Ministry on 21st February which invited objections, if any, within a period of 60 days, from the general public, however, no public hearing was conducted, in view of the COVID-19 pandemic situation and the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) announced by the Government, by imposing the nation-wide lock-down. It was also submitted that the draft notification was not made available to the local people in the vernacular language, as per Rule 3 of the Notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forests, dated 19.01.2009 and the Official Memorandum of the Government of India, Ministry of Environment and Forests, dated 19.04.2010. Court’s observation The Court, in its order, observed that as per the relevant rule & the Official Memorandum, the notice of public hearing as well as the Draft Environmental Impact Assessment Report has to be advertised in one major National Daily and in one Regional Vernacular Daily in Official State Language, enabling the local people to understand the importance of the notification and to respond. The Court said, “Mere issuance of the notification in Hindi and English languages will not be sufficient to comply with the requirement of the aforesaid notification dated 19.01.2009 and the Official Memorandum dated 19.04.2010, unless it is issued in the vernacular languages.” The Court also remarked, “This Court expects the Central Government to issue all the notifications in the vernacular language of the States, which is the primary requirement, apart from Hindi and English languages. Otherwise, the very purpose of the notification will be lost. After all, languages are the medium of communication for people.” The Court further observed that reduction of the size of the wildlife sanctuary from 0-10 kms to 0-3 kms would definitely affect the environment and the same was attempted, without any public hearing. Importantly, the Court noted, “Like animals, many foreign birds are migrating to various sanctuaries across the Country. Birds, animals and other creatures are having every right to live in the world. This universe is meant not only for humans, but also for every other creature. Since this is a serious issue affecting our environment, the matter has to be dealt with very seriously.” Observing that the notification is not made known to the local people, as required, the Court said that “the local people are prevented from making any effective objection to the impugned notification.” Lastly, the Court said, “The present COVID-19 Virus has also made the issue very complex, as the people could not come out and give their objections. Therefore, there shall be an order of interim stay of the gazette notification issued by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Government of India, in CGDL-E-23092020-221903, dated 22.09.2020.” The matter has been posted for further hearing on 14th December.Advocate P. Puhazh Gandhi argued for the petitioner. Case title – M. Satheesh v. The Secretary To Government Of India [WP(MD) No.17277 of 2020 and W.M.P.(MD)No.14467 of 2020] Click Here To Download OrderRead OrderNext Storylast_img read more