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EXCLUSIVE: Sister Sparrow Bassist, Josh Myers, Talks New Side Project And Gives Dirty Birds Update

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first_imgBassist, Josh Myers, best known for being in Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, is currently working on his revived side project, Big Words. With two upcoming dates in July and potential for more in the fall, Live For Live Music chatted with Myers to find out more about what’s going on with Sister Sparrow and to learn more about what he’s been up to recently.L4LM: Take us through your younger years. What were some of your influences? Who inspired you and how did you find your way into the music industry?Josh Myers: I started playing music when I was about 6. I grew up outside of Boston and got into classical piano for a number of years. I never really got good at that. Right around the beginning of high school, I switched piano teachers. My new teacher was a jazz pianist. Instead of just teaching the mechanics of the piano, he was teaching the mechanics of music. That’s where I started to get really into music.Around 16 or so, I really got into the guitar and it came very naturally to me. Then, I switched to bass about a year later, just as a hobby. This is the same story that every bass player has. There were way too many guitarists in my group of friends. I picked it up for the first time at a friend’s house, who happened to have one, and we played Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love” for like six hours with one groove. When I got really into the electric bass, I went through all of my favorite music just playing along to it. It gave me a chance to learn different styles by different people.By the time I got to college age, I was thinking I was going to be a jazz musician. I still play a little bit of jazz, but it’s been taken over more by the stuff I loved in high school, which was The Meters, Soundgarden, Tool. It swings back and forth, whether it’s the ’70’s funk, soul, and groove stuff that really moves me or that really heavy grunge that I just loved and would listen to in high school in my room on loop.L4LM: What is currently happening with Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds? Can you bring fans up to speed on what they can expect next? JM: The guitarist, Sasha Brown, left and began doing his own thing. Unrelated to that, Arleigh Kincheloe became pregnant. There was a long period of time when people were asking us what was going on with the band. We weren’t touring. The main thing that we did was tour. We would occasionally take a break to record. We were never the kind of band that put anything in front of touring, so it was a huge change for us. Post baby, we still have plans to be a band. We are all still in the fold. That’s what we’re all thinking.After Sasha’s departure show in New York, we had about ten shows after that. It was mainly Northeast stuff, and we played some New Year’s shows. We played Bearsville Theater in Woodstock, which was amazing. We opened for Galactic at Playstation Theater in Times Square. Then we went on Blues Cruise in January and had four sets on that boat. After the fourth one, we were all looking around like, “Okay, that was it. We’re on break now.” It was a really strange feeling.Break has been really good, actually. I’ve reconnected with the writing side of myself, and the freelancer side. I’ve had a ton of different gigs, going to different places, doing stuff I haven’t done in the last four years because I’ve been full time on the road. It’s been great.L4LM: This brings us up to your revived project, Big Words. Tell us more about that.JM: After the band realized that we were going to have some time off, I started doing a lot of soul-searching. I did some iTunes library searching and found this music that I had written and recorded back in 2009. The band, Big Words, was completely different. We actually had the drummer from the original line-up of Sister Sparrow, Bram Kincheloe. Basically, I just forgot about it. I remember when I stopped doing it, I made a conscious effort to tell myself that I had been leading and starting bands for my entire career. If I didn’t stop that, I would become one of those people that are control freaks.I wanted to branch out and see what other bandleaders’ styles were. I also wanted to check out my own bass playing and give it a real chance when I wasn’t the one calling all the shots. Fast forward eight years, I’m listening to this music and thinking, “Oh man! I like this stuff. It’s so good.” I totally forgot about all of it.  While listening to a few of the songs I was thinking, “I wrote that?”I reached out to a few people that I’ve been wanting to play with, and they all said, “yes.” They are all great guys and amazing players. The goal now is to put this music in their hands and let it breathe. There’s a lot of room for stretching out, and we plan to do a lot of the ‘anything can happen’ attitude with the music. Hopefully, everything will happen.L4LM: You have a few shows slated for July with possibly more in the fall. Is that the plan?JM: That is the plan. We’re working on some more dates in September right now. We’re going to look at more in October. I’m hoping to do a couple weekends every month once we get going, and hopefully, record in the winter.I have a lot going on. Basically, I’m home a lot of the time. I’m still on the road quite a bit, but it’s more of little quick runs on weekends. Being home, I’ve had a chance to really spend a lot of time working on music production, mixing, writing stuff of my own, and working with other writers. You have a lot less time to think when you’re sitting in a van.L4LM: Do you have anything going on during festival season? Are there any projects or collaborations you are working on throughout the summer?JM: As of now, I have one thing booked with a band called The Mammals. They’re up in Woodstock, New York. They put on a festival called The Hoot, which is at the end of August. That’s what I’ve got for festival stuff right now. Next summer, I would love to hit festivals with Big Words in between Dirty Birds dates.The line-up for Big Words for their upcoming shows on July 14th and 15th will consist of Myers on bass, Danny Mayer of The Eric Krasno Band on guitar, Chris Bullock of Snarky Puppy on sax, and Bill Carbone of Max Creek on drums. For more information on Big Words, and how to get tickets for their upcoming shows, please visit their Facebook page.  To check out their music, head over to their BandCamp page to take a listen.Words by Sarah Bourquelast_img read more

Voices from the trees

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first_img“I’m a bad influence,” Microsoft CEO and philanthropist Bill Gates told a crowd of graduating Harvard students in 2007. The speech, delivered before a boisterous Commencement crowd, and recorded for posterity, is out of the archive and streaming from the trees — literally.To celebrate the University’s 375th anniversary, Gates’ address — as well excerpts of other famous addresses — will play on loop from trees in Harvard Yard as part of a project called Harvard Voices, which runs today through Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. The selections reflect Harvard’s collective memory and continuing dialogue of ideas.“As you walk through the Yard, you will hear the voices of Bill Gates, J.K. Rowling, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and other notables who have spoken here at Harvard in the past,” said University Marshal Jackie O’Neill, whose office has overseen the project. “We hope people will pause for a moment and linger, to reflect on what is being said and on all the history made in the space we hurry through every day.”Harvard Voices: Listen to Gloria SteinemOriginally prepared for the University’s 350th anniversary, the recordings have been updated to include major addresses in the past 25 years by public figures and creative artists, as well as the reflections of notable Harvard speakers, including the likes of Al Gore, J.K. Rowling, Colin Powell, Nelson Mandela, Alan Greenspan, Gloria Steinem, Sandra Day O’Connor, and the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.Feminist activist Gloria Steinem, seen here on Harvard’s campus, is one of the many contemporary voices passersby will hear in the Yard. File photo Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerGates’ self-deprecating remarks were, of course, an acknowledgment of his reputation as Harvard’s most famous dropout. “I’ve been waiting more than 30 years to say this: ‘Dad, I always told you I’d come back and get my degree,’” he said to riotous applause. “I’ll be changing my job next year, and it will be nice to finally have a college degree on my résumé.”Harvard Voices: Listen to Bill GatesNobel Peace Prize recipient Mother Teresa spoke at Harvard’s Class Day in 1982. “I have no gold and silver to give to the American people,” she said, “but I give my sisters, and I hope, together with them, you will … go in haste to find the poor. And if you find them, if you come to know them, you will love them. And if you love them, you will do something for them.”” … Go in haste to find the poor,” Mother Teresa told students in 1982.Harvard Voices: Listen to Mother TeresaIn another recording, poet and Harvard graduate E.E. Cummings recalls his undergraduate experiences in a series of Norton Lectures titled “I — six nonlectures.”Harvard Voices: Listen to e.e. cummings“Unofficially, [Harvard] gave me my first taste of independence and the truest friends any man will ever enjoy. The taste of independence came during my senior year, when I was so lucky as to receive a room by myself in the Yard, for living in the Yard was then an honor, not a compulsion. And this honor, very properly, reserved itself for seniors who might conceivably appreciate it. Hitherto I’d ostensibly lived at home, which meant that intimate contacts with the surrounding world were somewhat periculous. Now I could roam that surrounding world, sans peur if not sans reproche, and I lost no time in doing so. A town called Boston, thus observed, impressed my unsophisticated spirit as the mecca of all human endeavors.”Harvard gave E.E. Cummings the “first taste of independence and the truest friends any man will ever enjoy.”And, delivering a speech to the Harvard Law School Forum in 1962, Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. spoke: “We’ve been able to say to our bitterest and most violent components: ‘We will match your capacity to inflict suffering by our capacity to endure suffering. We will meet your physical force with soul force. Do to us what you will, and we will still love you.’ ”Martin Luther King Jr.: “We’ve been able to say to our bitterest and most violent components: ‘We will match your capacity to inflict suffering by our capacity to endure suffering. We will meet your physical force with soul force. Do to us what you will, and we will still love you.’”Harvard Voices: Listen to Martin Luther King JrOther recordings include addresses by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Samuel Eliot Morison, Gertrude Stein, Winston Churchill, George C. Marshall, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, John F. Kennedy, W.E.B. Du Bois, Leonard Bernstein, Barbara Jordan, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Seamus Heaney, Sheldon Glashow, Steven Weinberg, and a unique recording of the riveting last 40 seconds of 1968’s Harvard-Yale football game, in which the Crimson furiously rallied to tie.To listen to the addresses, take a walk through the Yard or visit iTunes.last_img read more

Teens who use smokeless tobacco often smoke

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first_imgAbout one in 20 middle and high school students who chew tobacco and use other smokeless tobacco products also smoke cigarettes, a new Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) study shows. The findings suggest smokeless tobacco products may increase – rather than reduce – health risks from cigarettes and other traditional smokes. While cigarette use has declined over the past 10 years, smokeless tobacco use has remained at 5%, the researchers reported.The group analyzed questionnaire responses from 18,866 U.S. students in sixth to 12th grade classrooms at 178 schools in the 2011 National Youth Tobacco Survey. The researchers found about three-fourths of the approximate 6% of teens in the study who used “chaw,” snuff, or other such products also smoked cigarettes. Teens with friends and family members who smoked were especially at risk of using both.The study, led by Israel Agaku of HSPH’s Center for Global Tobacco Control, was published online August 5, 2013, in the journal Pediatrics.Constantine Vardavas, coauthor and senior research scientist at the Center, discussed the findings August 5, 2013 with the website MedPage Today.“Clinicians when they are engaging an adolescent patient shouldn’t only ask ‘Do you smoke cigarettes?,’ but also ‘Do you use any form of tobacco, including smokeless?’,” Vardavas told MedPage Today. “It’s important that a clinician convey the message that all tobacco products are harmful.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

Sustainability in Big Sky Country

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first_imgThe young Blake family left Boston and moved to Big Timber, Mont., in the early 1970s to try their luck at cattle ranching. Since then, Francis ’61, Sandi, and their sons, Peter ’93, Alex ’96, and Amory ’98 (who was born a few years after the move) have spent the better part of five decades turning a patch of unloved dirt into a ranch and nursery built for sustainability. Alex, who was just a month old when he arrived in Montana, now runs day-to-day operations with help from his father and younger brother, Amory. He says that his parents recognized early on that the long-term viability of the business would depend on embracing smart conservation practices. The Gazette recently spoke with Alex, who was an economics concentrator and heavyweight crew team captain at Harvard, about the business and his views on the future of regenerative ranching in Montana, and across the country. BLAKE: While we have a long way to go on this front, our long-term goal is to restore our rangelands to their historic potential. This would mean much greater plant diversity, increased soil organic matter, better wildlife habitat, and ultimately healthier, happier cows. Some of the specific goals and targets that we think about are increasing our livestock carrying capacity through better grazing management, further reducing the need for livestock (hay, protein supplements) and chemical (herbicide and pesticide) inputs, and developing a herd that’s a better fit for our environment (smaller-framed, better adapted to our harsh summer and winter climate). Through our involvement in a soil carbon program we’re taking a lot of baseline soil samples that will allow us to track organic matter and soil carbon levels. The program has a 30-year commitment, and we hope to see significant improvements over that time period. All of these goals tie directly to our bottom line. Considering the relatively small scale of our operation, we know that without making continuous improvements to our management skill set and on-the-ground practices we’ll have a hard time keeping this ranch economically viable.In the spirit of enterprise diversity, we’ve also developed a grass-fed beef program that will improve financial returns on our cattle herd. We sell directly to consumers who are interested in supporting our care for the land and animals. These animals are finished here on grass, never in feedlots, are handled using low-stress herding techniques, and have never received hormones or antibiotics, so we feel confident that we’re selling a great product. Ultimately, we would like to market all of our cattle through this program or a grass-fed beef cooperative that shares these management principles and values.GAZETTE: Talk about the climate of sustainable ranching, and your place, in the state of Montana.BLAKE: We consider ourselves fortunate to be working with many like-minded partners in the sustainable/regenerative ag movement. I work part-time with a great nonprofit called Western Sustainability Exchange (WSE) that’s providing resources to ranchers using regenerative practices, and there’s a great network of progressive ranchers spread across the state and region who are alumni of schools and workshops that promote sharing ideas and alternative management strategies. We’re still a very small percentage of the overall ranching community (and I want to acknowledge that many/most of the “traditional” ranchers care a lot about conservation and good management practices too), but I think the movement has been gaining a lot of interest as producers become more aware of the realities of climate change and resource scarcity.GAZETTE: What is the future of sustainable ranching more broadly?BLAKE: I’m really excited about the growing interest in understanding soil health and learning about how we can build and restore healthy soils on our native grasslands. A soil health conference held in Billings a few months ago drew close to 400 participants. That same conference drew only about 50 participants just a few years ago. We see similar interest in WSE workshops that address grazing management, low-stress livestock handling, and “drought-proofing” ranches, among other topics, so I’m optimistic about the future of regenerative ranching as younger generations see the imperative to be better stewards of our land, water, and wildlife resources.We know that consumers are also demanding more accountability in how land and livestock are managed, so being in a position to meet and document these expectations is important for the future of our industry. In my opinion, the potential for building soil organic matter and carbon sequestration though better grazing management is one of the biggest and most important developments in our industry. This is why we’re really excited to be one of the first ranches to sign up with a new grasslands soil carbon program, which will pay us for verified sequestered carbon. This program is unique because it also provides up-front funding for infrastructure improvements, through stock water and fencing, that will increase our ability to manage our grazing.Interview was edited for clarity and length. Q&AAlex BlakeGAZETTE: When did your family start thinking about the importance of sustainable practices?BLAKE: My parents realized soon after they moved our family here in 1973 that protecting our grasslands and conserving our precious soils and water resources was really important in making this ranch viable. In the early years they started fencing off riparian areas and adopting rotational grazing practices. They formalized their efforts to this end in the mid-1980s when my dad attended holistic resource management trainings, which promote “healthy land, healthy food, and healthy lives,” and further realized that there were some alternatives to the traditional practices that were in favor at the time.At the same time my mother, who started the nursery in 1977, was seeing increasing demand for native hardy plants and recognized that there were very few, if any, nurseries in the area that were growing and promoting their use in landscaping. There was a clear need for these types of trees, shrubs, and perennials, and she had a strong interest in them, so this was a clear business opportunity for the nursery. Native plants tend to thrive in harsh Montana conditions that can include extreme cold, difficult soil, drought, and heat, as they need a lot less water than many non-native species that are introduced, and which can at times outcompete, or even take over landscapes. My brother Amory now runs the nursery (with valuable support from our mother) and he has continued this emphasis on plants that will thrive in our challenging environment. GAZETTE: Environmental concerns were only beginning to catch on in the 1970s. So was there something about the ranch itself that made your parents so aware of the need for sustainable practices?BLAKE: Our ranch is not large by Montana standards, and we have had limited baseline soil and water resources from the outset, so conserving and hopefully improving what we had was important from day one. We want to give future generations the opportunity to continue living and working on this land. Considering changing climate conditions and uncertainties in our cattle markets, that may not be an option without good management practices. We also care a lot about maintaining open spaces and keeping ranch lands and farmland intact, so not getting ourselves in a financial position where we’d have to consider subdividing has also been an incentive to manage as best as we can. What will make our ranch sustainable in the long term is our ability to work together as family and pursue these passions of ours here on this landscape. I really like that I get to work cattle with my wife, Abby, and other family members, and now my 11-month-old daughter, Mabel, is often along for the ride. It is powerful to share these enjoyable and sometimes challenging aspects of ranching with people we love.GAZETTE: What are some examples of the sustainable practices you employ?,BLAKE: We use regenerative grazing practices that attempt to mimic how this landscape historically would have been used by bison. In practice this means short-duration, high-intensity grazing with an emphasis on long rest periods. Our native landscapes in Montana need grazing; the types of species of plant life that grow in Montana don’t always do well when left to their own devices. A limited amount of grazing can stimulate plant growth, clean up old dead grasses, and as this happens, encourage deeper root growth and nutrient cycling.We have also built a low-input cow herd that fits our environment (low annual precipitation, hot, dry summers, and, historically, cold and snowy winters) and have moved our calving dates to be in sync with our grass resources and more favorable weather. So instead of the traditional February/March calving season, we now calve in May/June when the cows are on better grass (which means there’s less need for feeding hay) and the calves aren’t potentially being born in the middle of a blizzard. As a result of these changes we have almost no sickness in our cows and calves, and we have drastically reduced the need for antibiotics. In addition, we don’t use any hormones in our cattle.GAZETTE: Have you also been able to incorporate new technologies?BLAKE: In terms of powering the farm and nursery, we’ve installed solar panels for tasks like pumping livestock and irrigation water and for powering one of the homes and several outbuildings on the ranch. The nursery has specialized in low-input (drought-tolerant, winter-hardy) and native trees and shrubs for years and we work hard to promote practical landscaping that fits our harsh environment. We have completely eliminated synthetic fertilizers from the ranch and have significantly reduced our use of chemicals (herbicides and pesticides) in both the ranch and nursery.Recently, we started using an app called MaiaGrazing that allows us to track livestock movements and forage resources in real time. We’re also doing more soil sampling that will allow us to receive payments for carbon sequestered as a result of our grazing practices. When we do have to reseed pastures, we now use no-till techniques; this means that, through timed grazing and the use of cover crops, we’re able to avoid disturbing the soil, and we’ve stopped using the herbicides that are typically associated with reseeding. We’ve also recently installed a center-pivot irrigation system that will significantly reduce our irrigation water use. And we’re waiting for my older brother, Peter, to deliver a drone (he works in the industry) to help us find missing cows and to better monitor our range conditions.GAZETTE: Do you have specific goals and targets that you try to strive for? “I’m optimistic about the future of regenerative ranching as younger generations see the imperative to be better stewards of our land, water, and wildlife resources.”center_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Robinson Center celebrates ninth anniversary

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first_imgFor the past nine years, Notre Dame faculty, staff and students as well as members of the South Bend community have volunteered their time to better their lives of local children at the Robinson Community Learning Center. The Center, an off-campus educational initiative sponsored by the University, celebrated its ninth anniversary Friday afternoon and gave thanks to the support of its volunteers.Speakers at the event included University President Fr. John Jenkins and South Bend Mayor Steve Luecke.Jay Caponigro, the founding director of the RCLC, was officially appointed to the position of the Director of Community Engagement for the University, a promotion effective March 1. No announcements about his replacement at the RCLC have been made yet.Friday’s festivities also included the recognition of various community volunteers and Notre Dame faculty and students who work to further the Center’s ventures.In addition, the James Kapsa Take Ten Award was presented to a local school leader and awards were given to the top 12 schools in the Take Ten poster design contest.The Take Ten Program is an outreach project of the Robinson Community Learning Center encouraging students to “Talk it out, Walk it out and Wait it Out” before taking action. The Center lists the mission statement of its Take Ten Program as one working “to promote choices and strategies that cultivate nonviolent communities.”Two Notre Dame seniors, Jarred Carter and Austin Dwyer, were recognized for their service within the center at the celebration.“We pretty much have an occupation where we are able to help kids, play with them, tutor them and also give them advice about the world and guide them in their future endeavors,” Carter said about his two and a half years of volunteer service at the Center.Members of the John Adams High School Jazz Band provided musical entertainment to guests, mainly consisting of parents of the students and elderly members of the community, Carter said.Each semester over 250 Notre Dame students volunteer at the Center.In a recent press release about his new promotion, Caponigro said he would continue to work to improve Notre Dame’s presence in South Bend and build relationships with both community leaders and ordinary citizens.  He also expressed hope that these partnerships would last, sustain, and grow because they are the “foundation of the Robinson Center.”last_img read more

UPDATED: Water boil advisory listed for areas of Johnson City

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first_imgJOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — The Village of Johnson City Water Department is advising residents of certain areas to boil their water before consuming.  —– The water department says customers will be notified when they no longer need to boil their water. 1 P.M. UPDATE: The water department is advising residents to bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using. They also recommend using bottled water.  Customers who live in the following areas should boil their water before consuming: The boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, brushing teeth, washing dishes, food preparation and making ice.  Tokos Grove RoadDellapenna DriveDellrose LaneReynolds Road between Tokos Grove and Pinewood BlvdOakdale Road – north of Overbrook RoadNelson RoadAetna Road between Oakdale and NelsonDeyo Hill Road — Between Reynolds Road and the Johnson City / Town of Dickinson line (added in 1 p.m. update)Columbia DriveDavid DriveEric DriveEric CourtEnid PlaceTamara LanePamela DriveWeymouth LaneMarlayne DriveChristina DriveMarian DriveAnna Maria DrivePenna RoadSan Marco DriveOakview DriveRose LaneLee CircleNadine WayDeborah DriveReynolds Road — Marian to East Maine Road (added in 1 p.m. update) For more information, please contact Robert Bennett, Director of Public Services at (607) 797-3031 or the Johnson City Water Department at (607) 797-2523. JOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — The village water department has removed several streets from the boil water advisory list. Please note the changes posted below. They say due to a water main break on Marian Drive and Christina Drive just off of Reynolds Road, certain areas became void of water. last_img read more

The city of Umag provided free parking to all its residents

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first_imgBravo for the move of the city of Umag. The purpose of tourism is to focus the newly generated tourist spending on a better quality of life for the local population. For whom to develop tourism if not for the local economy and the local population, which must directly benefit from it. Also, as there are large crowds in the city during the summer months due to the arrival of tourists, the quality of life of the local population is much lower. For example, going to the store, post office, clinic and other primary needs of the local population is sometimes not a possible mission. That is why the decision of the city of Umag on free parking in the city center is extremely important and an excellent example of the direction in which tourism should be developed. Namely, as they point out from the city of Umag, from June 1, 2016, all citizens residing in the Umag area and a traffic permit issued by the Umag Police Station, use free and unlimited large parking on the coast, 365 days a year. However, as Umag, as well as its population in the center and settlements is rapidly developing and growing, another decision was made that will greatly delight the people of Umag and which definitely puts Umag on the list of rare cities that provide free parking in the city center. , at as many as 5 locations. Photo: Google maps Umag thus became the first city in Croatia to have an organized parking payment system, but also organized free parking for its citizens in the city center, at 5 locations.center_img Citizens of the City of Umag, more precisely natural persons with permanent or permanent residence in the area of ​​Umag, are entitled to free parking on the parking lot of Šetalište Vladimira Gortana (coast), Šetalište Vladimira Gortana – at the gas station, Ulica Ernesta Miloša, Ulica 154. brigade Hrvatske vojske (in the part not reserved for tenants of POS apartments) and in the parking lot in Ulica žrtava fašizma. To exercise the right to free parking, you need proof of residence or permanent residence in the City of Umag and a valid traffic license for a personal vehicle in your possession. Find out how to get an e-vignette for free parking here After the introduction of a new and modern parking payment system “ParkWallet” in early June, which allows parking from a smartphone with a credit card, the City of Umag at a recent session of the City Council provided all its citizens with free use of four large parking lots. makes 5 free parking spaces in the city center.last_img read more

Mexico’s Cancun braced for possibly ‘catastrophic’ Hurricane Delta

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first_imgMexicans formed long lines at supermarkets near Cancun on Tuesday to stock up in preparation for a forecast hit overnight from powerful Hurricane Delta, while the resort ordered hotels evacuated on its famed Caribbean shoreline.The Category 4 hurricane on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale of intensity was about 215 miles (345 km) east of Cozumel off the Mexican coast, packing maximum sustained winds of 140 miles per hour (220 kph), the US National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.”In the Yucatan Peninsula, potentially catastrophic hurricane conditions are expected in portions of the warning area late tonight and early Wednesday,” the NHC said. Expectations of tropical storm conditions led to evacuations of coastal areas in Cuba. Delta is forecast to weaken and linger over Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula before strengthening again in the Gulf of Mexico, where oil companies were bracing for impact on their installations and ports closed.Officials ordered evacuations of Cancun’s hotel zone and other coastal areas, and opened the city’s convention center as a shelter. Workers at the Avis car rental firm boarded up windows with wood under a light rain on Tuesday afternoon.The governor of Quintana Roo state urged residents near the shore to evacuate, while recommending health precautions in shelters due to the COVID-19 pandemic.”We have to prevent COVID-19 in these sites, we have to take all preventative measures to this effect,” Governor Carlos Joaquin said, noting that the hurricane could take 12 hours to pass through the state after touching down by 2 a.m. Joaquin recommended households stock up on food and water for two or three days, anticipating delays in restoring water and electricity.A hurricane watch was in place for an area stretching from the beach town of Tulum, west past Cancun, and including Cozumel, an island made famous by Jacques Cousteau for the quality of its reef scuba diving.Since Monday, local residents have formed long lines at supermarkets and construction stores to load up on food and supplies to protect their homes, television images showed.”Panic buying” left some shelves empty of basic pantry goods, said Marian Castro, who lives in Cancun’s hotel zone and recalls the destruction wrought by Category 5 Hurricane Wilma in 2005.”I’m not scared, because after Hurricane Wilma … destroyed my house, this time we’re more prepared,” she said, pointing out her anti-cyclone windows.Water levels could rise by as much as 9 feet (3 m) over normal tide levels near Delta’s landfall, accompanied by dangerous waves in the hurricane warning area.The Yucatan peninsula was hit on the weekend by Hurricane Gamma, a smaller storm that nonetheless damaged property and forced restaurants and attractions to close, including the famed Chichen Itza pyramids.The region at the heart of Mexico’s tourist industry has suffered various setbacks in recent years, most recently from the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on tourism.Before that, the coast known as the Riviera Maya was affected by swaths of Sargasso seaweed on its pristine beaches.Cuba’s western province of Pinar del Rio and the Island of Youth also hunkered down ahead of tropical storm conditions, with schools closed and coastal areas evacuated.center_img Topics :last_img read more

PAHO says wider access to ultrasound saves maternal lives in the Caribbean

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first_img Tweet 207 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! HealthLifestyleNewsRegional PAHO says wider access to ultrasound saves maternal lives in the Caribbean by: Caribbean Media Corporation – November 2, 2015 Sharecenter_img Share Share WASHINGTON, DC, United States (CMC) – The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) says better access to ultrasound and other radiology services can reduce maternal and neonatal deaths across the Americas, including the Caribbean.“Obstetric ultrasound is instrumental in identifying potential risks to mother and child, and interventional radiology makes child birth safer for some women by managing postpartum haemorrhage,” said Dr Pablo Jimenez, PAHO Regional Advisor in Radiological Health.“But the full potential of these radiological techniques have yet to be realized in our region,” he said, stressing the importance of “strengthening health systems to make life-saving radiology services more widely accessible.”On average, PAHO said 16 women die every day in Latin America and the Caribbean from complications of pregnancy or childbirth, while 250 babies die each day before having reached 28 days of age.PAHO said many of the complications, including foetal mal presentation, multiple gestations, ectopic pregnancy and placentaprevia, can be managed with early diagnosis starting with ultrasound imaging.Interventional radiology techniques such as embolization, in which radiological images are used to guide a catheter into the body to stop internal bleeding without open surgery, can play a major role in reducing deaths from postpartum haemorrhage, PAHO said.Overall, it said an estimated 8.2 per cent of mothers who give birth in Latin America and the Caribbean suffer from a severe postpartum haemorrhage that requires transfusion.PAHO said while pregnant women in high-income countries usually receive early and advanced prenatal care, including radiology services, “those services are lacking in many parts of Latin America and the Caribbean.“And where the services are offered, they are often of questionable quality,” PAHO said, noting that in some cases the radiographers are poorly trained to use equipment; while, in other cases, the technology either doesn’t work or has not been properly maintained.“Ultrasound equipment is relatively affordable, portable and, when operated by trained professionals, completely safe and accurate,” Jimenez said.“But radiology requires well trained professionals with extensive knowledge in the acquisition and interpretation of images coupled with the implementation of quality control and assurance programs to ensure a reliable and accurate diagnosis. Our goal is to make that level of care much more widely available.”PAHO said while maternal mortality declined 43 per cent in Latin America and 30 percent in the Caribbean between 1990 and 2010, “this progress was not sufficient to achieve the 75 per cent reduction by 2015 called for in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).”To help countries accelerate reductions in maternal mortality, PAHO said it is leading the “Zero Deaths from Haemorrhage” initiative.The initiative targets obstetric hemorrhage, the second-leading cause of maternal death in the Americas, by supporting country efforts to expand women’s access to the quality health services they need.PAHO said the initiative promotes quality assurances and respect for women’s rights while working to strengthen the health workforce and the use of simple health technologies.It also addresses geographical and cultural barriers that cause delays in women’s seeking care.PAHO said access to radiological services is “one more tool that can help reduce preventable deaths”.last_img read more

Ignite De Fyah concert hailed a great success

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first_img 214 Views   6 comments Share Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img EntertainmentLocalNews Ignite De Fyah concert hailed a great success by: – December 12, 2011 Share Fantan Mojah on stage during the concert. Photograph by Josiah St. Jean of Pictastic Photo Studio. (SEE PHOTO GALLERY BELOW) Patrons of the “Ignite De Fyah” concert, which took place over the weekend, has dubbed it as a great success.The concert which was postponed last week by the organizers in keeping with the National Day of Mourning in honor of Jefferson “Jeff Joe” Joseph was very well attended.There were performances by several of our local reggae artistes including Dr Silk, Aima Moses, Ras Judah and Nelly Stharre and Ras Algie.Although the show commenced late patrons were very happy that they attended and were mesmerized by Fantan Mojah’s performance.Fantan interacted with the crowd and asked what their views were on several social issues such as politics, pedophiles and the minimum wage in Dominica.He also congratulated the band, led by Armstrong James, for their excellence performance in providing the musical accompaniment for the show. Here are a few photographs of the concert. (Photographs by Josiah St. Jean of Pictastic Photo Studio): [nggallery id =100]Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more