Category Archives: sojmn

Sanitation workers’ strike 1968 — solidarity and resistance

by ,

first_imgMarchers supporting the sanitation workers’ strike pass through downtown Memphis, March 29, 1968.Fifty years ago, seven thousand sanitation workers, members of Teamsters Local 831, flooded City Hall Park on Feb. 2, 1968, demanding higher wages and benefits. That crowd was 70 percent of the entire sanitation workforce.For years the city had had an unfair policy by which sanitation workers’ salaries had to be lower than police and firefighters’ salaries. And sanitation workers contributed more from their paychecks but got lower pensions compared to police and firefighters.The importance of the strike was underlined by a flier handed out by Local 831, which pointed out the life expectancy of a sanitation worker was 54 years compared to 67 for the entire U.S. population. Even today, according to the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, “refuse and recyclable material collectors” consistently have one of the highest rates of on-the-job fatalities.  Seventeen NYC sanitation workers were killed on the job between 2000 and 2014.The workers’ decision to strike was about far more than money.One sanitation worker, a shop steward, said it all at a standing-room-only union meeting two days before the vote: “We may handle garbage but we’re not garbage.” (“Dignity and Respect: The History of Local 831” by Kevin Rice)At NYC’s City Hall Park, 7,000 sanitation workers, with Teamsters Local 831 President John DeLoury, say they are ready to strike, Feb. 2, 1968.New York: ‘No contract, no work!’The sanitation workers’ contract with the city had run out in May 1967. The city offered the workers a measly $400 annual wage increase. When NYC mayor and strikebreaker John Lindsay refused the union’s demand for only $200 more a year and other improved benefits, the workers shouted, “No contract, no work!”Then they “persuaded” their union leadership to waive the Teamsters’ constitutional requirement for a mail-ballot strike vote and launched the great NYC sanitation workers’ strike of 1968.Workers World Newspaper on Feb. 16, 1968, devoted six stories and an editorial to the strike, with headlines like “Sanitation strike came close to being a class showdown.”WW wrote: “There are 10,000 sanitation workers in New York City. They are asking for a $12 a week raise in pay. The total cost to the city would be about $6 million a year. … Last fall a little group of bankers convinced the city it needed ‘better subways’ and got a referendum passed to spend $2.5 billion for these allegedly better means of transport. This clique of bankers will supply the $2.5 billion of other people’s money for a price. They will rake off $125 million in tax-free interest each year for themselves and the city will pay it. That’s 21 times the $6 million the sanitation workers are asking for. And these bankers would never have to lift a garbage pail!”The 1968 strike continued for nine days until Feb. 10, despite the media demonization of the union. The New York Times wrote on Feb. 9: “The runaway strike by the city’s unionized garbage collectors is the latest miscarriage of civil service unionism that relies on the illegal application of force to club the community into extortionate wage settlements. … Mayor Lindsay has taken the right and necessary course in moving for an injunction under the state’s new Taylor Law. The city cannot surrender to such tyrannical abuse of union power.”NYC labor threatens general strikePresident of the sanitation workers’ union John Delury was jailed. Mayor Lindsay asked other unions, including District Council 37 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the city’s largest public employee union, to provide scabs and have their members pick up the garbage. In solidarity with the striking workers, other city workers refused.When Mayor Lindsay appealed to Gov. Nelson Rockefeller to call in the New York National Guard to break the strike, all the city unions, including DC37 and the New York City Central Labor Council, threatened a general strike. By Feb. 10, the New York Times was begging Rockefeller not to call in the Guard to avoid “insuring a general strike by all municipal civil service employees, and perhaps by all New York labor.”Rockefeller flinched, saying: “The National Guard was used to break a strike in which a family corporation was involved when I was a child. Men and women were killed. … I will not use the National Guard.” Rockefeller was referring to the 1914 Ludlow massacre, when his grandfather, John D. Rockefeller, the owner of Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, got the Colorado governor to call in the National Guard to break a mine workers’ strike. The miners and their families were huddled in tents when the militia opened fire. Over 60 strikers and family members were shot dead or burned alive when their tents were set ablaze by the troops.But Rockefeller was just pretending to shed tears for the Ludlow martyrs. Three years later in 1971, Rockefeller would massacre another group of striking workers, the Attica prisoners.A Workers World editorial named his real reason for sparing the sanitation workers: “Rockefeller refused to call the National Guard … because he was afraid to do so.” He had revealed his fear of labor’s strength in a Feb. 9 statement: “There are real risks as far as the stability and structure of organized labor and organized community are concerned.”When the strike was finally settled, the union won a wage increase above the city’s offer: double-time pay for Sunday work and a 2.5 percent increase in the city’s contribution to their pension funds.Most of all, this was a victory for dignity and respect for the sanitation workers and for labor solidarity.Memphis sanitation workers fight for their union, AFSCME Local 1733, and their right to strike, in the spring of 1968.And then — MemphisTwo days after the NYC sanitation workers’ strike ended on Feb. 12, the predominantly African-American sanitation workers in Memphis, Tenn., went on strike. The union on the ground in the strike was AFSCME Local 1733. This was the famous “I Am a Man” strike, which the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was supporting when he was assassinated.On Feb. 1, two African-American sanitation workers, Echol Cole and Robert Walker, had been crushed to death in one of the city’s outdated trucks. Memphis had no facilities for Black workers to wash up, change clothes or get out of the rain. Cole and Walker were sheltering from the rain inside the truck’s barrel when the compacting mechanism malfunctioned. The truck hadn’t been repaired because the city wouldn’t spend money for safety for these workers.Only recently, after almost 50 years, did their families receive their pension benefits. Many U.S. unions held a national moment of silence this Feb. 1 to honor Cole and Walker.On the first day of the Memphis strike, the Memphis Press-Scimitar wrote: “The country has been astonished at the garbage mess in New York, but it might have known that the trouble there was catching. Memphis Public Works officials said flatly that the trouble here was triggered by the developments which brought the New York strikers pay increases.”Jesse Epps, a veteran labor organizer involved in the Memphis strike, commented on the Memphis-New York connection. Epps, who was with Dr. King when he was killed on April 4, spoke to a 2008 New York City sanitation workers’ meeting. The workers were celebrating being the only NYC uniformed workers’ union to negotiate and win a Martin Luther King birthday holiday in their contract.Epps said: “It was you who gave [the Memphis sanitation workers] the courage to act. It was these men from New York, if I may use the colloquialism, that fired the shot and made [the U.S.] stand up and its conscience be pricked and compelled Dr. King and others like him to come into the fray.” (Workers World, Jan. 8, 2011)After the murder of Dr. King, oppressed communities in 110 U.S. cities rose up in rebellion.Lessons for todayDuring the two years after the New York City and Memphis strikes, sanitation workers in Baltimore, Md.; Washington, D.C.; Charlotte, N.C.; Atlanta, Ga.; Miami and St. Petersburg, Fla.; and Corpus Christi, Texas, all went out on strike.Now more than ever, it is crucial to remember the lessons of these earlier, militant strikes, led primarily by African-American workers, the majority living under brutal segregation in the South, but courageously fighting on.The ruling class and the Trump administration are ramping up attacks on public sector workers and unions, the majority of whom are women and people of color. A negative ruling on Janus v. AFSCME, scheduled to be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court on Feb. 26, could strike a financial blow at the ability of public sector unions to collect dues. As racist, sexist right-to-work backers spew their message supporting Janus, the U.S. labor movement is mobilizing resistance to this threat around the country, including a Feb. 24 NYC protest. We are not prepared to accept this assault on our rights without a fight!Today, in the face of these attacks, the 1968 NYC sanitation workers’ strike continues to be a spark for labor unity and class struggle.Yudelovich has been a public sector union activist in New York City for more than 40 years and dedicates this article to his mentor, WWP founding member, awesome labor organizer and dispenser of revolutionary optimism, Milt Neidenberg, who died on Feb. 4.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena

by ,

first_img Business News Community News top box 5 What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena Published on Friday, February 17, 2017 | 11:55 am Make a comment Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  HerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Yummy Spices For A Flat TummyHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News center_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Here are our carefully culled top picks from dozens of Pasadena events – the very best things to taste, watch, listen to, and experience, all presented weekly in our e!Pasadena email newsletter: Community News 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stufflast_img read more

Local Youth Golfers Learn About the 4R’s In Zoom Meeting With Korean Counterparts

by ,

first_img More Cool Stuff CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Screenshot of a 2020 conversation between the two First Tee – Pasadena and the First Tee- Korea chapters. (Image courtesy First Tee-Pasadena)During a recent Zoom meeting, teenage golfers in South Korea learned more about four words that will help them not only in their sport, but in life.Those words, the 4r’s, are: Replay, Relax, Ready, Redo, a tool that First Tee, an international organization which teaches young people to build a better understanding of themselves, uses to keep youngsters emotionally cool when dealing with a frustrating or difficult circumstance.The March 19 Zoom get-together between First Tee-Korea members and their counterparts with First Tee-Greater Pasadena, was the result of a Sister Chapter Agreement signed in December 2019 by First Tee–Greater Pasadena Executive Director Bob Baderian, who formerly served as the director of Parks and Recreation and assistant city manager for the city of Pasadena before retiring in 2002, and Mike Kim, executive director of First Tee-KoreaThe group says on its website it sees “golf as a metaphor for life — a game with unexpected challenges and ups and downs that help build strengths beyond the technical skills to play the game.”Baderian, according to a recent release, reported that during last month’s online meeting the youngsters from each chapter experienced true cross-cultural communication. Topics of conversation included such things as holidays with family and friends, as well personal interests, and the pandemic, which is hitting South Korea hard.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning against traveling at all to South Korea for nonessential reasons.During the meeting, First Tee–Greater Pasadena member Stephanie Foley was more than willing to attempt to correctly pronounce the Korean words and received applause from her fellow members as she spoke with accuracy.First Tee–Korea member Jake Jaeoh Han and Par level student shared his excitement for the upcoming baseball season, a commonality between both parts of the world for the love for baseball.Participants from each chapter spoke about other topics too, like what is the most popular food to eat during Lunar New Year in Korea, which is rice cake soup, and how Valentine’s Day in America celebrates sharing love with family and friends.With the help of First Tee–Korea’s Program Director Jiyae Seo, the 4r’s were introduced in Korean and slowed down enough for repeating.During the meeting the two chapters confirmed plans by the Korean chapter to travel to the United States in 2022, if travel conditions permit.To learn more about the First Tee, visit www.firsttee.org. Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Business News Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Sports Local Youth Golfers Learn About the 4R’s In Zoom Meeting With Korean Counterparts STAFF REPORT Published on Thursday, April 8, 2021 | 4:51 pmcenter_img STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Top of the News Herbeauty6 Trends To Look Like An Eye-Candy And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhy Luxury Fashion Brands Are So ExpensiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFinding The Right Type Of Workout For You According AstrologyHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News 64 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy last_img read more

Maureen McGinley’s post mortem injuries ‘an accident’

by ,

first_imgNewsx Adverts Maureen McGinley’s post mortem injuries ‘an accident’ By News Highland – January 4, 2011 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Pinterest Facebook Google+ Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+center_img 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Pinterest A Strabane family have said they believe they now know how their mother’s body sustained more than 30 fractures after her death in 2007.The family of Maureen McGinley have been trying for four years to find out how the fractures were caused at Altnagelvin Hospital in Derry.Mrs McGinley’s son James said they have been contacted by a former worker at the hospital.And he says what happened his mother was an accident: Twitter Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal WhatsApp Previous articleSuspected pipe bomb components found in DerryNext articleMixed views on future of Seanad News Highland last_img read more

Pine Level man sings his way onto ‘American Idol’

by ,

first_imgSamuel Swanson is participating in the ‘American Idol’ contest. The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Published 9:14 am Thursday, March 8, 2018 Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day “I was born in Pine Level, next to a historic site, Sikes & Kohn Country Mall,” Swanson said. “Even when I was young, I was always singing. I had a bubbly personality and enjoyed singing in church. And, I just kept on singing. I’m a follower of Jesus and inspirational music is all I’ve wanted to sing. After I graduated from high school, I was a cosmetologist but I soon got bored with doing hair. I wanted to use the gift that God had given me. I wanted to sing.”In 2015, Swanson got his first “break.” He auditioned for MTV’s “Copy Cat” and won first place. In  2016, a casting recruiter for Fox’s Showtime at The Apollo, contacted Swanson after coming across one of his videos. That contact provided Swanson with the opportunity to share the stage with numerous celebrities. His rendition of “Lay Me Down” at The Apollo brought the audience to its feet.“The show aired in December and changed my life forever,” Swanson said. “That opportunity was what I needed to make the move I needed to make – the move to New York City.” You Might Like Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Skip Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Sponsored Content Email the author Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell Pine Level man sings his way onto ‘American Idol’ Swanson can’t reveal anything about his performance and how far he advanced on American Idol. But, he said his hope is that his being selected to compete will be the inspiration for others to follow their dreams.“I’m from a small community in rural South Alabama,” he said. “I dream big and I work hard to make my dreams come true. You can accomplish your dreams no matter where you live. I want others to know that someone with the potential to be a great singer or an award-winning actor may be living behind Crowe’s or just down the road from you. If they dare to dream, their dreams could come true.”Samuel Swanson’s American Idol debut will be at 8 p.m. Monday, March 11 on ABC.Samuel Swanson is participating in the ‘American Idol’ contest. By The Penny Hoarder For Samuel Swanson, moving from the rural South to the Big Apple was a big change but it was the move he had to make to have a chance to hit the big time.“I moved to Harlem, got a vocal coach and started to audition and worked for and hoped for that big break,” Swanson said.  “At 8 p.m. Central Time, on March 11, Swanson will do his best to make the best of the big break that American Idol could be for him.And, it wasn’t a calk walk to the stage of the American Idol.“There were several rounds of the audition and I was hoping to get to perform before the judges,” Swanson said. “When I made it that far, I thought I had a chance. To compete on American Idol is a dream come true for me. I am so excited and so thankful for this chance.” Lee, Wilson join ATO Walk Hard journey On Friday, 33 members of Alpha Tau Omega will begin a grueling walk to Panama City to raise money and… read more Print Article Samuel Swanson is a dreamer, and he is proof that dreams can come true. On March 11, the young man from Pine Level, Alabama will be a contestant on American Idol, the popular singing competition television series. From there, he will plan his way and God will lead him where he should go.Swanson is the older son of Linda Swanson, a single mom.last_img read more

JUST IN: Some States Starting To Reopen And Lift lockdowns As The Battle…

by ,

first_imgPartial reopening planned, effective May 11.Statewide stay healthy at home order is in effect starting March 26. Gov. Andy Beshear announced that starting May 11, manufacturing, construction, vehicle and vessel dealerships, professional services, horse racing, pet grooming and boarding will reopen. Retail and houses of worship will also reopen as of May 20. Barbershops, salons, cosmetology businesses and similar services with no more than 10 people will reopen on May 25.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order LouisianaGovernor: John Bel Edwards (D) IllinoisGovernor: J.B. Pritzker (D) Shelter in place, effective April 3 till April 30.Partial reopening went into effect April 24.A statewide shelter-in-place order is set to expire April 30. On April 23, Gov.  Brian Kemp issued a new executive order to allow some businesses to reopen. Gyms, fitness centers, bowling alleys, body art studios, barbers, cosmetologists, hair designers, nail care artists, estheticians, their respective schools and massage therapists reopened April 24. Restaurants, social clubs and movie theaters will be allowed to reopen April 27. In-person church services are allowed but in accordance with strict social distance protocol.See shelter-in-place order | See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective 5 p.m. March 30 until 5 p.m. May 8.See stay-at-home order ArizonaGovernor: Doug Ducey (R) Stay at home, effective until May 15.See stay-at-home order Partial reopening went into effect April 27.A statewide stay-at-home order expired April 26, Gov. Jared Polis asked Colorado to transition to a Safer at Home model. Retail stores will be allowed to open for curbside delivery and will be allowed to phase in public openings. Offices will also reopen to half capacity, with telecommuting still strongly encouraged. Elective medical services and dentists, child care, and personal services  such as hair salons, tattoo parlors, pet grooming and personal training will be able to open with precautions. Restaurants will remain restricted to takeout and delivery.See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective 11:59 p.m. March 31 until April 30.Partial reopening went into effect on April 27.Statewide stay-at-home order is in effect through April 30, Gov. Bill Lee announced plans for restaurants to reopen starting April 27, with retail stores to follow. Newly reopened businesses will be under instructions to operate at 50 percent capacity.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement CaliforniaGovernor: Gavin Newsom (D) FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Stay at home, until May 25.Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.See stay-at-home announcement | See partial reopen announcement OregonGovernor: Kate Brown (D) ColoradoGovernor: Jared Polis (D) Stay at home, effective April 2 until April 30.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Statewide stay-at-home order is set to expire April 30. Retail stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls reopening May 1 — no more than 25 percent occupancy. Sole proprietorships, medical and dental offices can reopen. Outdoor sports with up to four people participating are allowed. Churches can expand in-person capacity.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement Stay at home, effective March 23 until terminated by the governor.See stay-at-home order Rhode IslandGovernor: Gina Raimondo (D) North CarolinaGovernor: Roy Cooper (D) No statewide stay-at-home order issued.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Gov. Gary R. Herbert did not issue a formal lockdown order but announced a statewide order of “moderate risk” effective 12:01 a.m., May 1. This allows permitted establishments to resume, including gyms, salons and other personal care businesses under strict guidelines. Dine-in businesses may also resume with extreme precautions.See partial reopen order FloridaGovernor: Ron DeSantis (R) Stay at home, effective  12:01 a.m. April 6 until May 3.Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.The statewide restrictions on social gatherings will be eliminated and every business can reopen under Gov. Mike Parson’s plan. All businesses can reopen on May 4 as long as social distancing guidelines, such as keeping 6-foot distance from other people, are followed. Some businesses will be required to take additional precautions to protect their employees and the public, such as occupancy limits at retail locations.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective  8 a.m. March 24 until May 15.See stay-at-home order Partial reopening went into effect April 27.Statewide stay-at-home order expired April 24. Main street and retail businesses, outdoor recreation and organized youth activities can reopen April 27 with strict physical distancing. Restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries and casinos can become operational May 4 with reduced capacity. Schools closed until May 7, option to return at discretion of local school boards.See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective  12:01 a.m. April 1 until May 15.See stay-at-home order Partial reopening went into effect at 8 a.m. April 24.Gov. Mike Dunleavy allowed personal services businesses and restaurants in most parts of Alaska to reopen April 24, but with restrictions. Hair salons can only admit customers by reservation. Restaurants will have to keep distances between tables and can’t exceed 25 percent of their normal capacity. Dunleavy has said that Alaskans can again schedule elective surgeries for on or after May 4 and visit their doctors for nonurgent needs. The city of Anchorage is delaying the new rules until April 27.See reopen announcement Stay at home, effective  12:01 a.m. April 2 until May 31.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Gov. Janet Mills extends stay-at-home order in the form of a new “Stay Safer at Home” Executive Order until May 31. The new Order will continue to have Maine residents stay at home with limited exceptions for already permitted activities, such as grocery shopping or exercising. Stage 1 continues the prohibition on gatherings of more than 10 people, the quarantine of all people entering or returning to Maine for a period of 14 days, and the special precautions for older Mainers and others at risk of COVID-19. It calls for people who are able to work from home to continue to do so, including state employees. It will also require that people of Maine wear cloth face coverings in public settings where physical distancing measures are difficult to maintain, and continue strict requirements for long-term care facilities.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement Stay at home, effective  5 p.m. March 23 until May 15.See stay-at-home order No statewide stay-at-home order issued. ConnecticutGovernor: Ned Lamont (D) Stay at home, effective  8 p.m. April 1 until May 8.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Gov. Tom Wolf announced that some restrictions will be lifted on businesses related to certain outdoor activities. Golf courses, marinas, guided fishing trips and privately owned campgrounds may reopen statewide  May 1. State campgrounds cannot reopen until May 15.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement MassachusettsGovernor: Charlie Baker (R) IowaGovernor: Kim Reynolds (R) AlaskaGovernor: Mike Dunleavy (R) WisconsinGovernor: Tony Evers (D) GeorgiaGovernor: Brian Kemp (R) KentuckyGovernor: Andy Beshear (D) Stay at home, effective March 23 until May 4.See stay-at-home order New JerseyGovernor: Phil Murphy (D) South DakotaGovernor: Kristi Noem (R) IndianaGovernor: Eric Holcomb (R) IdahoGovernor: Brad Little (R) Stay at home, effective 4:00 p.m. March 28 until May 8.See stay-at-home order WashingtonGovernor: Jay Inslee (D) Stay at home, effective  11:59 p.m. March 24 until May 1.See stay-at-home order MontanaGovernor: Steve Bullock (D) MichiganGovernor: Gretchen Whitmer (D) Stay at home, effective 12:01 a.m. March 24 until May 15.Gov. Gretchen Whitmer extends stay-at-home order through May 15 and relaxes restrictions so some businesses can reopen. Retailers that do not sell necessary supplies may reopen for curbside pickup and for delivery. Big box stores can reopen “closed areas,” like garden centers. And bike repair and maintenance can come back online.See stay-at-home order Stay at home, effective 11:59 p.m. March 27 until May 18.Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.Gov. Tim Walz extended the statewide stay-at-home order until May 18. Besides that, the governor also announced that retail businesses and other non-critical businesses will resume operations with curbside pick-up.See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective  5 p.m. March 31 until May 15.Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced that the state’s stay-at-home order would be extended until May 15. Retail businesses will be allowed to begin opening Monday May 4. A plan for reopening restaurants will be announced next week.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement Partial reopening went into effect April 20.South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster was reopening many nonessential businesses starting from April 20,  including public beaches, furniture stores, apparel stores, department stores, sporting goods stores, bookstores, craft stores, music stores, flea markets and flower stores.See partial reopen order North DakotaGovernor: Doug Burgum (R) Stay at home, effective April 1 until May 15.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Gov. Steve Sisolak announced that the state’s stay-at-home order would be extended until May 15. All retail businesses will be allowed to operate under curbside commerce models, similar to curbside pickup currently allowed for restaurants and eateries. Drive-in services are now permitted for places of worship.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order West VirginiaGovernor: Jim Justice (R) NevadaGovernor: Steve Sisolak (D)center_img AlabamaGovernor: Kay Ivey (R) Stay at home, effective 12 p.m. March 24 until May 18.See stay-at-home order Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.Nebraska is one of the states that has not issued a stay-at-home order. Gov. Pete Ricketts announced upcoming changes that ease some restrictions on social gatherings and business operations starting on May 4. Restaurants will be permitted to allow customers inside at that time, but must permit no more than 50 percent of their normal capacity. Salons, massage businesses and tattoo parlors will be limited to 10 people at a time, with everyone wearing face coverings. Houses of worship will be able to meet in-person, but with six feet of separation. Bars and indoor theaters will remain closed until May 31 in most of the state.See partial reopen order MinnesotaGovernor: Tim Walz (D) MissouriGovernor: Michael L. Parson (R) WyomingGovernor: Mark Gordon (R) Stay at home effective March 27 until May 4.See stay-at-home order New HampshireGovernor: Chris Sununu (R) Stay at home, effective  12:01 a.m. March 25 until May 31.See stay-at-home order South CarolinaGovernor: Henry McMaster (R) Stay at home, effective  5 p.m. March 25 until April 30.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.During the first stage, places of worship, daycares, youth activities, and camps will be allowed to open. All other nonessential businesses will remain closed until May 16.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective  12:01 a.m. April 3 until April 30.Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.Gov. Ron DeSantis announced a reopening plan to lift the state’s stay-at-home orders on April 29. This plan will go into effect on May 4 in every county except Miami-Dade, Palm Beach and Broward counties. State’s restaurants and retail stores will be allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity, if the local government allows it.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement DelawareGovernor: John Carney (D) Stay at home, effective  8 p.m. March 23 until May 20.See stay-at-home order Stay at home, effective March 24.Partial reopening planned, effective May 2.Gov. Phil Murphy announces reopening of N.J. state parks, golf courses, county parks, beginning at sunrise Saturday, May 2.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement Partial reopening went into effect 5 a.m. May 1.Gov. Kim Reynolds signed a proclamation allowing restaurants, fitness centers, shopping malls, libraries and race tracks (not including horse and dog races) to reopen on May 1. Other retail establishments will also reopen in certain counties, but will limit the number of customers to 50 percent of its maximum legal occupancy capacity. Counties that will not reopen retail establishments include Allamakee, Benton, Black Hawk, Bremer, Dallas, Des Moines, Dubuque, Fayette, Henry, Iowa, Jasper, Johnson, Linn, Louisa, Marshall, Muscatine, Polk, Poweshiek, Scott, Tama, Washington, and Woodbury County.See partial reopen order Partial reopening went into effect May 1.North Dakota is one of the states that has not issued a stay-at-home order. Gov. Doug Burgum released “North Dakota Smart Restart” protocols for businesses resuming or continuing operations during the COVID-19 pandemic on April 28. It includes operating standards for all industries, as well as specific guidance for several high-contact business sectors that were closed.See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective 5 p.m. March 25 until May 15.Partial reopening went into effect April 27.Statewide stay-at-home order is in effect through May 15. Starting April 27, Gov. Phil Scott plans to reopen outdoor and construction work, manufacturing and distribution with a maximum of 5 people. Supporting operations with curbside pickup and delivery services, outdoor retail and libraries with curbside pickup will also continue.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Arkansas is one of the states that has not issued a stay-at-home order. Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced new public health orders effective May 1. All State parks will begin a limited reopening of some facilities for residents starting May 1. Rental of campsites, cabins, lodges, and RVs will be limited to Arkansas residents. Restaurants may resume limited dine-in service on May 11 under Phase one guidelines that require a daily health screening of staff, use of face masks and gloves and strict social distancing.See partial reopen order OklahomaGovernor: Kevin Stitt (R) Partial reopening went into effect April 24.Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt did not issue a formal stay-at-home order, but he announced a statewide approach to reopen businesses April 22. Hair salons, barbershops, spas, nail salons and pet groomers can begin opening April 24 for appointments only in the first phase of reopening. The businesses are required to follow social distancing and sanitation guidelines released by the state’s Department of Commerce. Other nonessential businesses will be permitted to reopen May 1 as long as they follow the social distancing and sanitation guidelines.See partial reopen order VermontGovernor: Phil Scott (R) Stay safe, effective May 1 until 11:59 p.m. May 29.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Gov. Mike DeWine rolled out the first phase of the reopen plan. Here are the key dates for when certain businesses are allowed to resume and what rules they have to follow:May 1: Hospital, medical, dental and veterinary services that don’t require an overnight hospital stay.May 4: Construction, distribution, manufacturing, offices.May 12: Consumer, retail and service businesses.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen announcement NebraskaGovernor: Pete Ricketts (R) Stay at home, effective  5 p.m. March 21 until May 30.See stay-at-home order Puerto Rico KansasGovernor: Laura Kelly (D) MaineGovernor: Janet Mills (D) MarylandGovernor: Larry Hogan (R) UtahGovernor: Gary Herbert (R) Stay at home, effective  12:01 a.m. March 30 until May 3.Partial reopening planned, effective May 4.Gov. Laura Kelly issued a statewide stay-at-home order in late March and extended until May 3. On April 30, she announced her plan to lift the statewide order to begin Phase One of the “Ad Astra: A Plan to Reopen Kansas.” Mass gatherings are still limited to 10 people or fewer. Businesses can reopen unless otherwise identified by the governor or local government.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order Safer at home, effective 5 p.m. April 3 until 8 a.m. May 11.Partial reopening went into effect 8 a.m. April 27.Gov. Tate Reeves has extended the shelter-in-place order to May 11. The new order means retail stores that have been closed due to the previous order can now reopen, but only with fewer customers inside. Reeves said strip malls and shopping centers can reopen if they follow the safety mandates from the Mississippi State Department of Health to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Those businesses will have to reduce their capacity by 50 percent and they must provide hand sanitizer for customers when they walk inside.See safer-at-home order | See partial reopen order “Safer at Home” order, effective until 5 p.m. May 15.Partial reopening went into effect on April 30.A statewide stay-at-home order expired April 30. Alabama is taking its first steps in reopening the state in a plan dubbed “Safer at Home.” On April 30 at 5 p.m. the safer-at-home order went into effect. Residents are responsible for wearing face-covering and encouraged to practice hygiene. Work or gatherings with more than 10 people that cannot practice 5-feet distances are banned. All retail businesses allowed to open with 50 percent occupancy and social distancing guidelines. Elective medical procedures can resume.See safer-at-home order | See partial reopen order ArkansasGovernor: Asa Hutchinson (R) Stay at home, effective March 30 until June 10.See stay-at-home order HawaiiGovernor: David Ige (D) TennesseeGovernor: Bill Lee (R) New MexicoGovernor: Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) Stay at home, effective March 24 until May 15.Partial reopening went into effect 8 a.m. May 1.Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced the state would reopen partly beginning 8 a.m. May 1. This includes non-essential businesses for health, safety and welfare. Non-essential retailers can provide curbside pick and delivery with permitted licenses. Additional businesses include state parks, licensed firearm retailers by appointment only, golf courses for golf only, and permitted pet services.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order Stay at home, effective at 8 p.m. March 30 until terminated by the governor.See stay-at-home order OhioGovernor: Mike DeWine (R) Stay at home, effective at 8 a.m. March 25 until May 26.Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Gov. Tony Evers directed the Dept. of Natural Resources to reopen 34 state parks and forests effective May 1. These include state parks and forests, hunting and fishing on open properties, boat lunches in open state properties and linear/rail trails.See stay-at-home order | See partial reopen order PennsylvaniaGovernor: Tom Wolf (D) Reopening AmericaSome states are starting to reopen and lift lockdowns, even as the battle against the coronavirus rages on.By Jiachuan Wu, Robin Muccari, Anna Sundberg, Brianna DeJesus-Banos, and Daniella SilvaApril 29, 2020 / Updated May 1, 2020It’s been six weeks since the first stay-at-home orders were announced in the United States amid the coronavirus pandemic that has ravaged the country with more than a million known cases and more than 60,000 deaths. Nearly two months since the social distancing measures began, certain states are slowly starting to reopen their economies.As of this week, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp allowed some nonessential businesses to reopen, including restaurants, gyms, nail salons and movie theaters.In Texas, the statewide stay-at-home order was set to expire after April 30, with retail stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls allowed to reopen on May 1.“That executive order has done its job to slow the growth of COVID-19, and I will let it expire as scheduled,” Gov. Greg Abbott said in announcing the reopenings. “Now, it’s time to set a new course, a course that responsibly opens up a business in Texas. TexasGovernor: Greg Abbott (R) Stay at home, effective March 19 until further notice.See stay-at-home order Partial reopening went into effect April 30.Week 1 phase of reopenings begins on April 30. From there, each phase of the reopening process for Weeks 2-6 will begin on Monday of each subsequent week. Case numbers will continue to be monitored throughout the entire reopening process. Week 2 would include small businesses with fewer than 10 workers, professional services, like barber shops by appointment only, outdoor dining, church services and funeral services with social distancing practices.See partial reopen announcement VirginiaGovernor: Ralph Northam (D) New YorkGovernor: Andrew Cuomo (D) Partial reopening went into effect May 1.Wyoming is one of the states that has not issued a stay-at-home order. Gov. Mark Gordon announced new public health orders effective May 1, which allows gyms, barbershops, hair salons and other personal care services to reopen under specific operating conditions designed to minimize public health risk from COVID-19.See partially reopen announcement MississippiGovernor: Tate Reeves (R) District of ColumbiaMayor: Muriel Bowser (D)last_img read more

NORTH BERGEN BRIEFS

by ,

first_imgCounty’s homeless hotline AGAIN doesn’t pick up when we call – days after homeless man freezes to death in portable pottyEight days after construction workers in Union City found a homeless man’s body in a local port-o-potty, the county’s homeless hotline is again not working. Two reporters called the number for two hours on Wednesday, a cold, snowy day, and listened to the phone ring more than eight times with each call. Others who tried got a busy signal.This is the third time in two years that the Hudson Reporter – in the course of routine reporting on the homeless situation – tried the 24-hour emergency line and got no answer.Each time, county officials gave apologetic responses and promises to fix the line – which homeless people are supposed to call in winter if they need shelter and the three local shelters are backed up. The county runs an overflow shelter in Kearny.The hotline is 800-624-0287.Stories by The Reporter(hudsonreporter.com) back to 2016 showed problems with the line, with various county officials saying it was another department’s responsibility.On Jan. 9, local workers discovered a homeless man’s body in a port-o-potty at a construction site near a church in Union City, according to Police Chief Richard Molinari. The construction site is the location for the Sts. Joseph and Michael Church, severely damaged in a fire last March.A company is currently performing repairs to the church, located at 1314 Central Ave.According to Molinari, the man was Hispanic and in his late 20s. The chief believes that he used the port-o-potty to escape the freezing temperatures.“The weather was certainly a factor in causing his death,” Molinari said. “If someone’s going to seek refuge in a port-o-john, that does not protect you from the low temperatures.”Township seeks to lease land from state for new parking lotAt their Jan. 10 meeting, the North Bergen Board of Commissioners adopted an ordinance to rent state-owned property located between Tonnelle and Liberty avenues, and between Union Turnpike and 40th Street.The town hopes to use the space as a municipal parking lot, according to Town Administrator Chris Pianese.“The town was pursuing buying it from the state,” Pianese said after the commissioners’ meeting. “But then we considered the lease option, which they presented to us. We were very happy to hear that, because for a dollar a month, we can lease the property for a 10 year term.”Though the deal may sound too good to be true, Pianese said that the deal was a “token way of expressing [from the state] that you’re getting it for nothing.”Once the state approves the lease, the town will get an architect to figure out how many parking spaces can fit in the area, and then work on the actual lot as soon as the weather improves. Pianese estimates the lot will have 75 parking spaces.“It’s a big lot,” he said.Phil Murphy visits North BergenThree days before being sworn in as the 56th governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy paid a visit to North Bergen as part of his “New Day in New Jersey” tour, designed to highlight problems and opportunities for mass transit in the state.Mayor Nicholas Sacco was on the platform at the Tonnelle Avenue light-rail station on Saturday, Jan. 13 to greet the governor-to-be, along with Commissioners Hugo Cabrera, Julio Marenco, and Allen Pascual.They were joined by a large crowd of local dignitaries and residents eager to shake hands and take photos with the next governor.Arriving on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, Murphy expressed his strong support and admiration for Mayor Sacco, who also serves as a state senator. The visit to North Bergen was part of a day-long trip to various transit hubs in North Jersey, and included the ride on the light rail from Jersey City via Hoboken and numerous other stops, ending up at North Bergen and visiting with mayors and other top public officials along the way.Murphy has committed to addressing problems with New Jersey’s transportation infrastructure. Elected as governor to succeed Christopher Christie, he was sworn in on Jan. 16 in Trenton, along with Lieutenant Governor Sheila Oliver.Suez Water disruption to impact portions of township on Jan. 23Suez Water announced that they will perform system improvements on Palisades Avenue in Union City in January, which will impact customers in portions of North Bergen.On approximately Jan. 23 (weather permitting), work will begin on a 30-inch main between 41st and 43rd Streets, and residents and motorists may experience parking disruptions in the vicinity of the work zone.The work will take approximately 18 hours and will begin at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 23 Customers may experience lower than normal water pressure south of the 43rd Street while work is being performed.Should weather not permit work to be performed as scheduled, it will be rescheduled and the service disruption will occur on Tuesday, Jan. 30.Suez advises that residents may wish to store water prior to the interruption to satisfy basic needs.Soccer registration now openMayor Nicholas Sacco and Commissioner Hugo Cabrera announce that soccer registration is taking place for ages 6 to 16 from Jan. 16 through Feb. 24.Register between 2 and 9 p.m. Monday to Friday at the North Bergen Recreation Center, 6300 Meadowview Ave., or at the white trailer by the soccer field in North Hudson Park from 5:45 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, or from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday.Proof of residency is required, along with a birth certificate/passport, one current passport-size photo (no photocopies), and a gas/water/electric/home telephone/cable bill. No cell phone bills accepted.A non-refundable $35 registration fee is required. Please bring cash (exact change), check, or money order.Additional restrictions apply. See the flyer below for further information, or call (201) 861-9601. Man arrested in Union City for allegedly sexually assaulting 10-year-oldThe Union City Police Department arrested a 31-year-old man on Jan. 13 for alleged sexual assault of a 10-year-old girl the day before, according to the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office.According to an HCPO press release, the man allegedly assaulted the girl on the steps of her apartment building.The alleged victim was able to escape and alert an adult, who then contacted the UCPD. That same day, UCPD detectives contacted the County Prosecutor’s Special Victims Unit regarding the alleged attack.An initial investigation led to the suspect at a nearby shelter. Officials transported the man to a Hudson County Prosecutor facility to Jersey City. However, he escaped the facility soon after. Officers recaptured him within 24 hours.The man, who – according to the Prosecutor’s Office press release is Luis Bescome of East Elmhurst, N.Y. — is charged with sexual assault, a second degree crime; endangering the welfare of a child, a third-degree crime; escape, a third degree crime; possession of controlled dangerous substance; defiant trespassing, and obstructing the administration of law or other governmental function.Hudson County Prosecutor Esther Suarez credited the Union City Police Department for their assistance in catching the suspect. She also credited the NJ State Police, the Maywood Police Department K-9 Unit, the Jersey City Police Department and the Hudson County Sheriff’s Office for assisting.last_img read more

Man, machine, method and money

by ,

first_imgBy Max Jenvey of Oxxygen Marketing Partnership, a strategic management agency that works on brand development within the bakery, foodservice and convenience retail sectorsTime is everyone’s most valuable asset, so how do today’s successful in-store and high street bakers manage to achieve their targets? Answer: by giving customers what they want, when they want it, in the right location and, of course, at the right price.Consumers are more time-crunched than ever, with 65% of food-to-go shoppers looking for a quick takeaway option (him! Food-to-go Report 2009). So it is important to make your bakery or café the easiest choice for customers offering a variety of takeaway meal deal options, snack times and breakfast and ranging from a small section that offers self-select loaves and baguettes, to muffins and sweet treats and on up to full counter service and a range of ready-to-eat hot options, such as slices, turnovers and paninis.Forecourts successfully follow this model and drive around 40% of their revenues through food and beverages. So what can independent bakers and retailers learn from this? The answer is to manage four key areas of your business your 4Ms: man, machine, method and money:l Man this is your most valuable asset. Look at skill sets, customer service, staff friendliness, training in hygiene, health and safety, quality control, suggestive selling, waste management, incentives and feedback.l Machine your equipment is key. Carefully consider location, customers and product range, coffee machine, hot displays, hot and ambient counter-top merchandisers, ovens and grills and chilled units. And there is always help at hand food suppliers, such as Bako, BFP, Brakes and Delice de France etc, can advise you on the different equipment elements.l Method this involves planning parts of the day, with the right offer in the right time and place. Remember to break down each part of your trading hours, based on customer flow and demand. People want to grab croissants and coffee in the morning, which need to be baked-off or supplied before 6am. Lunch is all about your sandwich range, sausage rolls, pasties and pizza slices. Consider soup, paninis and hot fillings.l Money get the first three Ms right and watch the profits roll in! Understand the contribution from each product by range and category and do your sums. Identify your best/worst performers change that range, refresh your beverage offer, focus on value and quality and your customers will spend their money with you.last_img read more

Press release: Additional year to deliver ambitious court reforms

by ,

first_imgAs a major government project HMCTS reform is subject to a cross-government approvals process, which is ongoing.Notes to editorsFigures are drawn from management information and are not official statistics. A pilot of fully-video hearings in the tax tribunals. The national implementation of a new in-court system to record the result of cases digitally and instantly. A pilot of a new digital system providing shared case information in criminal cases to the police, Crown Prosecution Service, courts and legal professionals. A Civil Money Claims service with more than 51,000 claims made since it first launched in March 2018, with the fastest claim being lodged and paid under two hours. Almost 90% of users say they are satisfied or very satisfied with the new service. An online Divorce Service, with more than 31,000 applications made since it launched in April 2018. The online form takes half as long to complete as the paper form, and has reduced the error rate. Online Probate Service with more than 12,000 personal applications made since July 2018. We opened two new Courts and Tribunals Service Centres in Stoke and Birmingham in January 2019, which are dealing with digital cases in the Single Justice Service, divorce, Social Security and Child Support and some probate services. Support to help people use online services if they choose to. Learning from the services that we have already delivered and the feedback received, including from the Public Accounts Committee and the National Audit Office, we have decided to re-order aspects of the programme. This will allow more time to develop some of the shared systems that sit behind our next set of online services, working to an updated finish date of 2023.The reform programme is both essential and ambitious. It will transform the administration of justice by shaping it around the needs of its users, and we are determined to deliver it effectively in the interests of all.Existing services, which are already providing quicker and easier access to justice for many – including divorcing couples, executors of wills and people appealing decisions about their benefits – continue to be available and will have more elements added to them in the coming years.With the leadership of the government and the judiciary, the HMCTS Reform Programme is increasing the accessibility and efficiency of the justice system by shaping it around the needs of those who use it.The £1 billion reform programme has already delivered:last_img read more

Landscape Services details annual snow removal effort

by ,

first_imgDespite South Bend’s reputation for frigid winters and heavy snowfalls, members of the Notre Dame community need rarely worry about snow or ice on walkways and parking lots during even the coldest months of the year. Each year, Landscape Services partners with the Athletic Grounds Team for the enormous undertaking of Notre Dame’s snow removal operation, which Tim Dyczko, assistant superintendent of landscape services, described in an email as “the best in the business.”“We use a combination of 1/2 ton trucks all the way up to two 1/2 ton dump trucks to clear 21 lane miles of roads and 93 acres of parking lots,” Dyczko said in the email. “Our walks total over 41 miles across campus, which are cleared using large mechanical brooms as well as snow blades when the snow becomes too deep for broom operation. We also take care of [over] 40 sets of stairs/steps as well as cut throughs from the parking lots and all the bus stops across campus.”A “lane mile” is a technical term meaning one mile long by 12 feet wide.Landscape Services prepares for the first snowfall months in advance, Dyczko said. When a snowstorm or heavy snowfall is anticipated, they will lay down liquid anti-icer in advance to prevent snow from sticking to walkways. In addition to physical removal of snow, granular salt is applied to sidewalks to melt accumulated snow and ice.“We have had other institutions inquire about how we are able to keep our walks in such good condition during the winter with little to no damage to the grass come springtime,” he said. “The machines we use for the walks are custom-built to remove snow and place granular product and anti-icing liquid all in one pass. It is a complex yet very well-organized operation of highly skilled operators who know their areas of responsibility extremely well every time it snows.”Dyczko said the crews maintain 22 hours of coverage every day from Dec. 1 to April 1.“When we are faced with a snow event, our crews come in at 2 a.m. with the goal of having campus clear and safe for our campus community by 7 a.m. unless conditions dictate otherwise,” he said. “Often times during big snow events, our crews will work 12-hour shifts for several days until the event is over.”Dyczko said that removing snow and ice is crucial for University function during the winter months.“It is a safety issue most of all,” he said. “If it is not safe to drive and walk on campus, then the entire operation of the University is at risk.”Dyczko praised the Landscape Services employees for their hard work year-round ensuring that the campus remains clean and safe.“The staff that is charged with snow removal is the same team that does such a great job in maintaining the campus in spring, summer and fall,” he said. “They are highly dedicated employees who work very hard to ensure that campus operations, including classes and research, are not interrupted by even the worst of winter weather.”Tags: Anti-icing, Athletic Grounds Team, De-icing, Landscape Services, Snow Removallast_img read more