Category Archives: dqvfk

Online AML registration system for upmarket letting agents finally goes live

by ,

first_imgHMRC’s online Anti-Money Laundering or AML registration system for lettings agents has finally gone live four months after its original launch date in January following delays caused by IT difficulties.Letting agents are the final part of the industry to be included in the AML regulations which since January have covered agents who rent properties for more than £8,800 (€10,000) a month.While this might sound a lot, in London this includes nearly 3,000 rental properties marketed by hundreds of agents, and another 1,000 properties in the Home Counties.The agents marketing these types of homes must now register with HMRC, follow the AML regulations and have until January 10th next year to comply in order to trade legally. This includes ensuring that relevant staff within each agency have passed the relevant approval checks.£100 feeIn January, when the registration system was originally expected to go live, HMRC dropped its £100 fee charged to each agency when first registering to be supervised.This decision appeared to be a sop to agents after the annual per branch renewal fee was increased to £300, up from £110 five years ago.A month after this, AML specialist IamProperty revealed that almost a third of agents were unsure if they were compliant with the rules, that many believed reporting AML activity to HMRC might lose them sales and that others felt that the process of complying with the rules was too time consuming.Read the official AML guidance for estate agents. Anti Money Laundering directive AML Savills May 27, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » COVID-19 news » Online AML registration system for upmarket letting agents finally goes live previous nextCOVID-19 newsOnline AML registration system for upmarket letting agents finally goes liveAgents renting properties for more than £8,400 a month have until January next year to register their businesses for AML and comply with the regulations.Nigel Lewis27th May 20200710 Viewslast_img read more

Norway: KONGSBERG Celebrates 200th Anniversary

by ,

first_img View post tag: Navy Share this article Industry news March 20, 2014 View post tag: Norway Throughout 200 years what is now known as KONGSBERG has been an industrial trailblazer in the defence, maritime, oil, gas and aerospace sectors.“There are not many businesses in the world that can boast 200 years of continuous operations, and this is something we are very proud and respectful of. We can look back on a unique and memorable history, and we are now a leading international high-technology corporation,” says CEO Walter Qvam of KONGSBERG.1814: The establishment of the Norwegian defence industryKongsberg weapons factory (KV) was founded by Poul Steenstrup, mining superintendent and participant at the national assembly at Eidsvoll, on 20 March 1814. This represented the establishment of Norway’s first factory, even before the industrial revolution in Norway.During the spring of 1814, Norway had gained its constitution. And the work of building the country’s first factory began in Kongsberg. The establishment of Kongsberg weapons factory in 1814 must be viewed in the light of other events of the same year. In January 1814, Norway had been ceded to Sweden, after centuries of union with Denmark. However, in Norway forces were working to give the country independence, and the need for a defence industry developed.From the industrial revolution to international high technology supplier KONGSBERG has experienced numerous eras, including Norway’s incipient industrial revolution in the 1800s, the development of the post-war technological industrialized Norway and the internationalization of Norwegian technology and expertise in the final decades until today.[mappress]Press Release, March 20, 2014; Image: Kongsberg View post tag: 200th View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today Norway: KONGSBERG Celebrates 200th Anniversary View post tag: celebrates View post tag: Naval KONGSBERG celebrates its 200th anniversary on 20 March. The company can boast the longest industrial history in Norway, with continuous operations since the foundation of the Kongsberg weapons factory in 1814. View post tag: Kongsberg Norway: KONGSBERG Celebrates 200th Anniversary View post tag: Anniversarylast_img read more

Arms and my childhood

by ,

first_imgIn 1992, a european country was destroyed while the rest of the world watched. Its nucleus,however, resisted, fought back and survived three years of siege and bombardment. By1995 over 170,000 people had been killed and several times that many injured. It wasBosnia and Sarajevo, and a war that substituted for my childhood. The Serbs blockadedSarajevo that april: their snipers took positions on high buildings in the suburbs, killingat random. as Sarajevo is in a bowl-like valley, within days their artillery occupiedthe hills surrounding us and aimed down. Soon, the Serbs turned off the electricity, thefreezers begun to defrost and everyone was cooking so the food wouldn’t be wasted.Simultaneously the bombing started and we began spending nights in the basement of ourapartment building with our neighbours eating all this food, like some strange nocturnalunderground picnic. For a child, it seemed we were in some crazy festival, like the circus had come to town, andat the end there would be a big meal and the children would play while the adults talkedabout how bizarre it had all been. But then water and gas pipes were switched off, the foodran out and the bombing intensified. The maternity hospital was bombed, pictures ofpeople shot dead in the city filled the newspapers and from the look in my parents’ eyes Irealised it was time to be scared. The men in the building took turns to guard the entranceat night, armed with semi-automatic rifles. Bosnia had no real army because theYugoslavian army was mostly made up of Serbs, so the government released from prisonand armed some powerful gangsters who formed militias to defend the city. Theyessentially saved Sarajevo from falling in the first weeks, before an organised army was setup. as children we sang songs celebrating their bravery. I still regard them as heroes,despite their crimes. At home, we abandoned all rooms with windows, leaving us with onlythe hall to live, and cook and sometimes sleep in. But most nights we slept in thebasement, sometimes staying there for days. Water was brought from a nearby pump.Food was scarce and monotonous and before long we were down to one daily meal of rice,beans or pasta. By the time we left Sarajevo I had forgotten what ice cream was, and whether oranges hadto be peeled. It was all the more surreal because I couldn’t understand what was going onor why. On the radio, I heard ‘ethnic conflicts’ mentioned, but this seemed like an answer toa different question, one I didn’t ask. My father is Muslim, my mother roman Catholic, mybest friend Orthodox Christian and my nanny was Jewish. But, as a family we celebratedthe Orthodox Christian festivals with our Orthodox Christian friends,the Jewish ones withJewish friends and so on, and probably took them as seriously as they did. Religion servednot to preach, but to bring friends and family together, secure theseties and carry ontraditions passed down to us. How ironic it was then that which had helped unite uswas now being used to divide and kill us. Most Muslims in Sarajevo don’t go to the mosque, don’t know arabic or how to pray, smokelike chimneys and drink alcohol like the best of them, so the idea that they could suddenlygo on a jihad to establish a fundamentalist Muslim state seemed incredulous even to achild. However, that’s what the Serb politicians claimed, what they convinced many of theirpeople was happening and what some in the outside world seemed to (want to?) think.In reality, I later understood, it was a genocidal, nationalist war, initiated by Milosevic,Karadzic, and some Bosnian Serbs to make a ‘Greater Serbia’. Bosnia was to be annexedand the Muslims living there killed or removed. My parents decided to stay in Sarajevo,partly because they are doctors and most doctors had left. Five anaesthetists served a cityof 350,000 during the war, my mother being one of them. But also because it was Sarajevo:a city where four religions, the east, the West, capitalism and communism, met tocreate an energy that so many thought was worth fighting for. The city was all it wasbecause it was multicultural and multiethnic, and we wanted it that way.Perhaps I idealise ante bellum life in Sarajevo. The privileged life that I led there, ofnannies, ballet lessons, winters skiing in the mountains and summers on the coast,wasn’t a life that many had. There were many problems that didn’t affect us but, still,there was something unique about Sarajevo, something that made everyone proud tolive there and made so many stay to fight for her. Peter Maas, a Washington Postcorrespondent who spent 1993 in Bosnia, wrote “Sarajevo was a temptress,and it was hard to know which was more seductive, the half-mad look in her eyes, orthe scarlet drops of blood on her extended hand. Temptresses have different allures withwhich they entice their victims, and the oddest thing about Sarajevo’s allure was that themore ghastly she appeared to the outside world, the more her buildings were destroyedand the more starved her residents looked, the more seductive she was. Sarajevo wasviolence and passion.” It was the longest siege in modern times, but for theresidents there was never the option of surrender. Just a sense of defiance, a sense thatin Sarajevo we were right and just had to hold out until the world realised that too. I remember the night when the Serbs set the national Library on fire. My parents took us upto the roof during the bombardment to see what the cowards with their tanks on the hillswere doing. and camera crews filmed this and the aftermath of massacres and broadcastthe unedited footage on TV, to show the world what was happening. and it saw, but whenthe Un Secretary General Boutros-Ghali visited, he just said, “I can give you a list of tenplaces where you have more problems than in Sarajevo.” Meanwhile, my parents went outto work separately, so that a single grenade couldn’t kill them both. But, on Christmas eve1992, dad and I were leaving the house and he was shot as we walked down the street.Fortunately he was only wounded while many others we knew were killed. Lucky, everyonesaid, that it wasn’t me. The strange thing was how quickly this stopped upsetting us:by the time they started burying people in football stadiums, death had lost its novelty value.In war, you see things you don’t want to see. You live through things you don’t want to. Youlose people you love. as a child, you grow up quickly. There are no ‘boogie monsters’ underthe bed, trying to ‘get you’, because you know of real monsters, with real guns, who wakeup every morning with the aim of killing people like you. There is no school because theybombed it, but it would have been too dangerous to go there anyway. You stay indoors formonths and, when you can go out, you play ‘street wars’ with kids on your street, throwingrocks and glass at the other neighbourhood kids because you can’t remember the gamesyou played before the war. After three years my parents decided they had done enough. With the help of some Britishfriends mum went to england for a job interview and returned. One night, through a secrettunnel dug underneath the airport and over a mountain, she took my brother and me out ofSarajevo and to england. aged ten, I had my first day at school, she worked as ananaesthetist and a year on dad came to join us – a happy ending. But I don’t know whether Ishould be happy I lived to tell the tale or resentful that I have such a tale to tell. Probably it’sthe former. I feel privileged to have experienced man at his best and at his worst, risking lifeto commit good or evil. But, there is anger that it was allowed to go on: perhaps becauseMuslims were being killed, perhaps because Bosnia had no oil, perhaps because evenwhen Clinton intervened (after 9,000 Muslims were killed in two days in Srebrenica,a town declared a ‘safe area’ by naTO) it was principally to salvage his image. Politics-wise, I’m a cynic. But maybe I just can’t believe that mediaeval sieges of cities would betolerated in 20th century europe, that the attempted genocide of a people was toleratedfor years only fifty years after they said ‘never again’. I now realise what they meant was‘should never happen again.’ not quite the same, but how naively we hoped otherwise.ARCHIVE: 4th week MT 2005last_img read more

Proctors’ Office requires registered clubs to change rules

by ,

first_imgClubs registered with or looking to register with the University are being required to amend their constitutions to meet new University regulations. The new rules came into effect in October 2013, however, clubs that were already registered with the University were granted an academic year’s grace before they had to conform to the regulations.Clubs run by Oxford University students, which are open to students from various colleges are eligible to apply to register with the University Proctors.The Proctors’ Office acts as the administrative hub for the Senior Proctor, Junior Proctor and Assessor, who are elected by colleges annually. The Senior Proctor and Junior Proctor have responsibility for ensuring that the University, including clubs affiliated with it, operate according to its statutes.Clubs not registered with the University are forbidden from using ‘Oxford University’ in their names or to use the University’s coat of arms. After a club has been registered with the Proctors for at least two complete terms, it is then eligible to apply for special permission from the Vice-Chancellor to use the University’s name and arms.Registration enables clubs to receive support from the University Clubs Committee, which is chaired by the Assessor. Support offered by the committee includes discounted access to insurance cover, minibus hire and photocopying. The committee also gives small start-up awards of up to £200 to new clubs.However, some clubs have been unhappy about some parts of the new pro forma constitution that incoming regulations require affiliated societies to conform to, except in cases where the Proctors’ office has approved any deviations.The pro forma constitution of non-sports clubs requires clubs to ensure that at all times the activities of the club in question are conducted in accordance with University policies and codes of practice, which includes its Integrated Equality Policy, Code of Practice on Harassment and Bullying, and Code of Practice on Freedom of Speech. Other requirements include that every member of a club’s committee and every officer of a club are “entitled to be indemnified by the club against all costs, charges, losses, expenses and liabilities incurred by him or her in the execution or discharge of his or her duties or the exercise of his or her powers, or otherwise properly in relation to or in connection with his or her duties.”The pro forma constitution also states that a club “may be dissolved at any time by the approving votes of two-thirds of those present in person or by proxy at a General Meeting.” A club may also be dissolved, without the need for any resolution of the members, on not less than thirty days advance notice from the Proctors to the Secretary of the Club, or if at any time the Club ceases to be registered with the Proctors.In addition, under the rules, if a club is being dissolved, its assets are required not to be automatically distributed amongst the members, but paid to or at the direction of the University.President of Oxford Scandinavian Society Erik Hammar commented, “The Oxford Scandinavian Society initiated the process of registering with the University some time ago. However, we were informed that it had since recently become a requirement that all clubs bring their constitutions in line with a standard version. My committee and I were surprised by this reply. The specimen constitution is extremely detailed, attempting to govern the fine details of the club’s administration. More importantly, however, it grants final interpretative powers to the proctors, and further it demands that the club’s assets must be “paid to or at the direction of the University” in the case of dissolution. In the light of these highly questionable clauses, we have halted our registration process and are currently discussing how to proceed.”A spokesperson for the University commented, “Clubs registered with the Proctors are required to follow the rules laid out in the constitution. This is the implementation of a decision of the Rules Committee which took effect from October 2013 with an academic year’s grace period for existing clubs. The Proctors’ Office is happy to advise individual clubs on specific issues as necessary and to listen to feedback on the constitution. A review of the general oversight of clubs has been agreed and will commence shortly.”last_img read more

Their Home May Be Gone, But Their Memories Live On. They Will Be Back…

by ,

first_imgThe Cavacini Family Editor’s note:  After our coverage of the house fire on 52nd Street on Thursday night, we heard from the owner.  Below is a piece that she wrote and would like to share:By Vanessa FioreMarch 15, 2017 around 6:30 pm I got a phone call while I was eating dinner that my shore house had burned down.  I think just like any other time of your life when a crisis happens, the first thing you think is “there’s no way this is really happening.”  But it was.  And it did.  And it’s gone.  I didn’t cry.  I was, and still am a little bit, in a state of shock.Our house is in Ocean City, NJ.  My grandparents had it built in 1967.  That house has been a constant for me my entire life.  It’s always been there for the summers and the times I just wanted to be left alone and think.  That house has seen hundreds of people come and go and parties like I could never tell my parents (just like any other kid-Dad, don’t get upset!)  My grandparents raised their kids in that house, my parents brought us up in that house and my cousin has raised his kids in that house.  4 generations in 50 years.I’d have to say that my favorite thing about it is that it FELT and smelled like a shore house.  That might not make sense to people who don’t frequently stay at the Jersey shore, but if you do and have, then you know exactly what I’m talking about.  It smelled like sand and salt.  The hardwood floors were obviously worn, but it was a good worn.  The house felt like it was lived in.  Like it had seen a lot.  Like it had been through a lot.  It felt safe.Shortly, after I received the call about the house, I received another call and that was to tell me that I was going to be the one to tell my grandfather what had happened.  I’ve had a lot of things happen in my life, but I honestly don’t think I’ve ever dreaded a conversation like I dreaded doing this.  My grandfather is 93 years old and for the most part, a pretty healthy man.  Little bit of vision loss, but aside from that, he’s still got it.  He’s seen and experienced more in his lifetime than I ever will.  My grandmother passed away over 20 years ago, so he lives alone and my family was worried that he would hear about the fire on the news.  As much as I didn’t want to be the one to tell him, the thought of him sitting on his couch and hearing that by himself was way worse.My husband went with me and helped me break this horrific news.  If I had to describe the way my grandfather received this news, I would have to say, “like a man.”  He’s a WWII veteran and let me tell you something-he acted like it.  He didn’t cry.  He didn’t start screaming and flipping out.  He simply sat there, in shock at first, and then just kind of put his head in his hands.  He didn’t really ask any questions.  He didn’t say much.  I put my hand on his shoulder and held his hand.  The only time I got choked up, was when I could see that he was flashing through all the years of memories with his eyes.Ya see, this house can be rebuilt.  We will go on and create new memories for the remainder of our lives.  However, my grandfather isn’t going to have that luxury.  He isn’t going to have the same opportunity that we all will.  And it’s THAT only fact that makes me cry.  Not the house burning down.  Not the loss of material possessions.  Not the memories.  The memories will be kept with us until the day we die.  The materials can be replaced.  The house can be rebuilt.This entire situation made me realize more clearly than I did before, how NONE of us would be mourning anything if it hadn’t been for this man.  There would be no house to drive down to, no parties to throw, no secrets to keep, no babies to put to bed.  I realized that this was probably the way he was going to remember his shore house, regardless of where we go from here.  I just didn’t want it to end like this for him.  I’ve always considered myself to be appreciative of what I have, but this situation has made me more so.  Even though he didn’t speak, I watched his pain.Nothing in life is forever, whether it be the good or the bad.  We hang on to things and people while we can.  We hang onto moments while we can.  Hopefully, we take risks while we can.  One ending is a new beginning.  Unfortunately, we don’t always have control over when one thing ends and another begins.  Thank you to my grandparents-Jim and Rose for giving us this wonderful privilege.  I love you and will do my best to make the next house a home too.For more about this topic and more visit Saddleupwithstella.com .last_img read more

Délifrance invests in sites and brand refresh

by ,

first_imgDélifrance is celebrating its 30th anniversary in the UK with investment in new and existing sites, a design refresh and a restructure of its brands.The European bakery supplier is investing in its factory in Wigston, Leicestershire – which produces bread and viennoiserie – to increase capacity. Away from the UK, it is also opening new headquarters in Ireland and has acquired a Heinz KG Bakery in Germany, providing a new site that will see Délifrance expand its premium, artisanal bread range.“It’s an exciting time for us at Délifrance UK and across the wider business. We already develop upwards of 300 new products a year, and these new sites and expansions will help us create and deliver even more,” said Stéphanie Brillouet, Délifrance UK marketing director.Délifrance has revamped its design with a new logo, colour scheme and UK website. The updated look aims to unify its global brand as well as its foodservice and retail offers.“Each country has different trends and tastes, but we sell a little bit of France wherever we operate. This new visual identity stretches across every country Délifrance operates in, bringing all 100 countries a little bit closer together,” added Brillouet.Alongside the new look, Délifrance UK has restructured its array of viennoiserie, patisserie, savoury and bread products into a range of brands. They are Core, Essentials, Heritage, ‘Feel Good’, ‘à la folie!’ and ‘A taste of’.last_img read more

Trey Anastasio Band To Perform Entire Spring Tour As The Trey Anastasio Trio

by ,

first_imgToday, Trey Anastasio surprised fans with the announcement that he would conduct his upcoming late-April Trey Anastasio Band tour with a Trey Anastasio Trio lineup featuring himself, drummer Russ Lawton, and bassist Tony Markellis. The decision to change the plans for the eight-date run comes after Monday’s announcement by Anastasio that longtime TAB keyboardist Ray Paczkowski had undergone surgery to remove a tumor from his brain last week, which raised questions about how his absence would be addressed for the upcoming shows.As Trey explains in an announcement post on his Facebook page:As we noted Monday, longtime TAB keyboardist and dear friend Ray Paczkowski is recuperating after having a tumor removed from his brain last week and is expected to make a full recovery.April 17, 2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the first time Trey shared the stage with Tony and Russ as part of the “8 Foot Fluorescent Tubes” concert that took place at the original Higher Ground in Winooski, VT. That show featured the debut of many brand-new songs and the genesis of the first incarnation of TAB. While Ray rests up, we have decided to use this upcoming short tour to celebrate this milestone and play the entire run as a trio for the first time since 1999. We will keep Ray in our hearts and minds as he recovers over the next few months and look forward to the full TAB lineup returning to the road soon.Refunds are available up until April 10th at the original point of purchase for fans who do not want to attend the shows as Trey Anastasio Trio.[Photo: Trey Anastasio Facebook]You can see a full list of upcoming Trey Anastasio Trio shows, or grab your tickets via Trey’s website.Following the spring run and a pair of dates at Levitate Music Festival in July, Trey’s other band, Phish, will hit the road for their nationwide summer tour. For a full list of Phish summer tour dates, head to the band website.last_img read more

Her wheels are always turning

by ,

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.For busy bicyclist and blogger Alice Anne Brown, MUP ’13, the wheels are always turning. They turn in her mind at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (GSD), where for two years she has studied urban planning — especially how bicycles can make cities more livable, lovable, and viable.And the wheels turn for Brown on the road, where she logs five to 20 miles a day on her one-speed Westport cruiser. It has fat wheels, pedal brakes, a single gear, and a seat that makes her sit up straight, all the better to just look around. (For weekend distance rides, she keeps a Specialized Dolce.) “I’m a three-city girl,” said Brown, whose home is in Somerville, school is in Cambridge, and work is in Boston (as a project manager at Boston Bikes, a citywide cycling initiative).She was born in Detroit, the Motor City, but her core passion revolves around how pedal power could be at the heart of a safe, practical, and low-impact urban life. Brown has ridden the bike lanes in many of the 22 countries she’s visited, though two years ago she was obliged to climb Mount Kilimanjaro on foot.“There is no better way to really see a place,” she said of biking. Her childhood seemed to be on wheels too, and rolled through Michigan to Maryland and back to Ohio for her father’s engineering career. Mostly, she grew up in the village of Baltimore, Ohio, where home was on five acres with a pond. She swam, ice skated, played the flute, and dabbled in 4H. (“I was a disaster at cooking and sewing,” she said.) Her younger brother took to country life, but “I have searched for cities ever since,” said Brown.At Ohio State University, Brown studied physics, then switched to mathematics. (She also rowed crew and played ice hockey.) As an undergraduate senator, Brown sat on a town-gown planning board that piqued her interest in how cities worked, including streetlight audits and regulations for commercial frontage. In 2003, armed with dual degrees in math and philosophy, Brown moved to the Bronx, where for five years she taught math to sixth- and eighth-graders.Even when teaching, Brown felt intimations of the career she ultimately would embrace: planning that would make the world’s cities greener. She spent many hours in New York’s Central Park, a place that she said feels like her real home. In a life-changing experience, Brown led her class through a unit on sustainability, including a look at the “No Impact Man” lifestyle. For a week, she rode her bike everywhere.When she moved to Ethiopia in 2008 for a three-year teaching job in Addis Ababa, her bike came with her, as did her interest in public spaces. Brown surveyed city parks in the capital. She also studied the ubiquitous and cheap 14-passenger minivans that provide informal public transport in much of East Africa. She realized that her interests had converged into a desire to study urban planning.“I wanted to change things,” said Brown, who applied to the GSD, was admitted, and started in September 2011.What’s next? “I could go anywhere,” said Brown. She has new skills at planning and assessment and a vision of cities where streets are designed for more than cars. Still, she added, “I don’t want to be just the bike girl.”last_img read more

Pipe bursts in Duncan Student Center, forcing evacuation

by ,

first_imgPhoto courtesy of James Martinson The Duncan Student Center is flooded after a sprinkler main burst on the third floor.“Due to the cold conditions, a sprinkler main broke on the third floor, causing damage there and on floors one and two,” University spokesman Dennis Brown said in an email.According to an email sent out by the University, the center will remain closed for the rest of the day but will tentatively reopen Friday at 7:30 a.m. Restaurants will be open normal hours and the Smith Center for Recreational Sports will open at noon, the email said.Tags: duncan student center, Polar Vortex, RecSports Almost two hours after campus reopened on Thursday, a pipe burst in the Duncan Student Center at approximately 2:50 p.m., forcing all inside to evacuate.last_img

Trail Mix January 2014: Free Music Download

by ,

first_imgIt’s a brand new year, and the first Trail Mix of 2014 hits right smack dab in the middle of a polar vortex.  Now, for some, that might be cause for panic, but with 16 brand new tracks waiting, those in the know do know that Trail Mix is just the recipe for warming up on a frigid winter day.Kicking off this January mix is one of my favorite bands. Railroad Earth, a stalwart of the folk/jam scene for over a decade, welcome 2014 with the release of Last Of The Outlaws. Recorded in the band’s native New Jersey, this new record continues Railroad Earth’s tradition of producing evocatively written and instrumentally astounding folk rock.One of the coolest stories I have heard is that of Leo Welch.  Trail Mix is thrilled to have a cut from his new record, Sabougla Voices, featured this month. Leo is a youngish 81-years-old and this is his debut recording. Stay tuned to the Trail Mix blog for more on this later this week.From time to time, Trail Mix gets to include tracks from some true heavyweights. Take a listen to new tunes from The Pixies and Los Lonely Boys.Trail Mix is happy to welcome some first time artists to the mix. Check out new tracks from Iain Matthews, Blackie & The Rodeo Kings, Lone Justice, Sleepy Sun, The Railsplitters, Annie Ford Band, The Blushin’ Roulettes, Mode Moderne, The Sacred Shakers, and Elizabeth & The Catapult. As always, one of the best things about Trail Mix is discovering new artists. All of these bands are tremendous.This month’s mix also features two of our favorite regional artists. We are featuring “50 Miles of Elbow Room,” from Travis Book of The Infamous Stringdusters, which comes off his brand new solo debut, Alice. The mix also has the most aptly titled song for this blustery weather, “Winter Is Coming,” by our good friends from the Shenandoah Valley, The Steel Wheels.We hope your new year has started in fantastic fashion and with one simple resolution – share Trail Mix more!  Please tell a friend about the mix or one of the many great artists featured this month.  Stream and download often.  And, of course, get out and purchase a disc or two from one of these great artists. Railroad Earth – When the Sun Gets in Your BloodAnnie Ford Band – Buick 1966Blackie & The Rodeo Kings – SouthElizabeth & The Catapult – Like It Never HappenedIain Matthews – Ghost ChangesLeo Welch – Praise His NameLone Justice – Nothing Can Stop My Loving YouLos Lonely Boys – Blame It On LoveMode Moderne – Baby BunnySleepy Sun – Galaxy PunkThe Blushin’ Roulettes – Purple CloudsThe Pixies – Blue Eyed HexeThe Railsplitters – Jackson TownThe Sacred Shakers – All Day, All NightThe Steel Wheels – Winters ComingTravis Book – 50 Miles of Elbow Roomlast_img read more