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US Navy’s Knifefish UUV completes contractor trials

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first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today US Navy’s Knifefish UUV completes contractor trials General Dynamics Mission Systems has completed contractor trials for the US Navy’s Knifefish program, the company announced Oct. 26.The Knifefish UUV is a mine countermeasure (MCM) unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) operated in multiple mine test target fields at-sea using buried, bottom and volume type mine-test targets.According to the company, the Knifefish system successfully demonstrated its ability to detect, classify and identify potential mines, at a variety of depths, each of which would pose a unique threat to naval vessels operating in a mission area.“The navy is pleased with the Knifefish performance during the recent contractor trials, as the system demonstrated its ability to reliably find mines in different environments,” stated Capt. Jonathan Rucker, PMS 406 program manager. “Knifefish provides the Navy a critical means to find and identify bottom, buried, and volume mines, providing a much-needed capability for the warfighter.”“This round of contractor testing demonstrated the continued improvement in the performance of the Knifefish UUV,” said Carlo Zaffanella, vice president and general manager of Maritime and Strategic Systems for General Dynamics Mission Systems. “Working closely with the Navy, we look forward to Sea Acceptance Trials in 2018 and continued refinement of the Knifefish system.”Contractor trials, managed by General Dynamics Mission Systems, took place off the coast of Boston using submerged Navy mine-test targets. These trials differed from previous evaluations of the Knifefish UUV by demonstrating end-to-end performance of the Knifefish system in realistic at-sea mission scenarios over the course of hundreds of hours of at-sea operation and more than a hundred simulated missions.Knifefish is a medium-class mine countermeasure UUV intended for deployment from the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship and other Navy vessels. Knifefish will reduce risk to personnel by operating in the minefield as an off-board sensor while the host ship stays outside the minefield boundaries.General Dynamics Mission Systems is the prime contractor for the Knifefish program. The company designed the tactical UUV based on the General Dynamics Bluefin Robotics Bluefin-21 deep-water Autonomous Undersea Vehicle (AUV). October 27, 2017 US Navy’s Knifefish UUV completes contractor trials View post tag: MCM Share this article Authoritiescenter_img View post tag: LCS View post tag: UUV View post tag: GDMS View post tag: US Navy View post tag: Knifefishlast_img read more

Remembering Bill Crout

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first_imgUntil late December, and for decades, William R. Crout, S.T.B. ’58, A.M. ’69 — talkative, inquisitive, a gifted listener, and a University man to the core — was a regular perambulator through the Square.Around Harvard, he seemed ever-present — a charming and calm social North Star. “I often would see him crossing the street,” said urban design planner William Doss Suter, whose office looks out over Massachusetts Avenue across from Wadsworth House. “I half expect to see him again.”Crout died on Feb. 11 at age 85, and will be remembered at a 10 a.m. service Friday at the Memorial Church. The service will include everything he loved: a beautiful church, a gathering of friends, and music.Born in tiny Mize, Miss., in 1929, a music and philosophy high honors graduate of Millsaps College in Jackson, Miss., Crout was a student pianist in the late 1940s when he performed at Carnegie Hall and as a soloist in Symphony Hall, Boston. From 1951 to 1955, he served aboard a Navy aircraft carrier, travelling the world as a chaplain’s assistant. Afterward, Crout enrolled at Harvard Divinity School, where he befriended and worked with the celebrated German theologian and University Professor Paul Tillich as a translator and editorial assistant.Crout was inspired for life by the relationship with the man who had wrestled modern existentialism and Christian symbolism into a synchronous whole. Crout founded the Paul Tillich Lectures in 1990 through the Office of the University Marshal.Richard M. Hunt, Ph.D. ’60, the retired University Marshal from that era, recalled that for more than a decade his friend oversaw the lecture series from a perch at Wadsworth House. “Bill Crout was a genuine ‘original’ at Harvard,” he wrote in an email. “He was not a faculty member and he was not an employee in any direct sense. But he was an oft-felt presence” — a regular at Morning Prayers, at the Memorial Church’s Sunday services, at Lowell House, and at the Signet Society.For his beloved lecture series, which he curated until last year, Crout raised funds on his own, and, when money allowed, arranged elaborate post-event dinners. Conversation over a good meal, after all, was a near-sacred ritual for Crout, who was devoted to deep talk and fellowship, and to introducing his friends to one another.The lectures, delivered by prominent scholars influenced by Tillich, “were always interesting, and often thrilling,” said his friend Julia Kilmer of Cambridge. Speakers over the years included former Harvard President Nathan M. Pusey, biologist E.O. Wilson, Physics Professor Emeritus Gerald Holton, and former Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall.The fate of the lecture series is now in debate, though every one of Crout’s friends interviewed agreed that keeping it alive would be his fondest wish. “He wanted to be sure that Harvard took religion seriously,” and the lectures provided one avenue for that, said Richard Griffin ’51, a former Jesuit priest who was Harvard’s Roman Catholic chaplain from 1968 to 1975. “He lived by Tillich.”Each of the lectures, held in the Memorial Church once or twice a year, represented a glorious moment for Crout, as did the conviviality each dinner inspired. Of the total lecture experience, said Griffin, “I’m tempted to say it was heavenly for Bill.”HDS has established a fund both to honor Crout’s life, a spokesman said, and to “perpetuate the memory of Paul Tillich at Harvard.”Crout held a series of administrative and lecturing positions at Harvard through the years, including the directorship of the Memorial Church School. He was a scholar, a raconteur, a music aficionado, a writing coach, a regular at Memorial Church affairs, a collector of Asian art, and a member of the venerable Signet Society. “He inhabited many more worlds than any of us know,” said Marina Mary Armstrong Connelly ’12.Crout was also a life coach to students through the Lowell House Senior Common room. Speaking with him, wrote Matthew McCalla ’17 in an email, “I felt as though I were more important, more capable, and more valuable than I was in my conversations with nearly anyone else.” Connelly, an Australian who met him as a 19-year-old freshman, remembered Crout in similar ways. “He was a supporter, a confidant, and a teacher.”“Bill was enormously interested in students, both through Memorial Church and through his presence at Lowell House,” said Suzanne Hamner of Cambridge, who met him in 1966 when her husband, Easley, was a student at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. More widely, “he was trying to bring people together,” she said, as a way to honor the kind of welcoming intellectual commons that a university should represent. “He was devoted to Harvard as a living, breathing institution, in the largest sense.”Bill Crout Memorial: Part 1Voice remembrances begin at 16:42, following the organ prelude. Bill Crout Memorial: Part 2Voice remembrances resume with poet Kevin McGrath. View memorial service program [PDF]But his ideals always played out on a human scale. “He had a genius for friendship,” said Kilmer, a friend of Crout’s for 25 years, along with her husband, the painter and art dealer Nicholas Kilmer. They met when Crout happened into an art shop the Kilmers had years ago on Massachusetts Avenue. “Bill walking into your life changes everything,” she said.“We are not very religious people,” said Kilmer of her household, but they represent the diversity of the friends Crout maintained outside the church circles he otherwise frequented. Another non-church venue was the Cambridge Writers’ Group, five or six friends who gathered weekly, starting in 1994, to discuss one another’s work.Sessions usually started with Crout delivering an anecdote, “something about Harvard,” said Elisabeth Hatfield ’58. She recalled — like most of his other friends interviewed — that Crout had a wide repertoire of University stories, back-channel tidbits, and even gossip. By the end of each writing group, Crout summed up his thoughts, from a manuscript’s “great intent,” said Hatfield, “to the finest points of grammar. He was a stickler.”But church venues were often the liveliest for Crout. He was a lifelong Methodist with catholic tastes for a range of Christian services in Cambridge — though he considered Memorial Church his true home, said Suter, as not only a memorial to war dead but as “a place of faith in the heart of a secular university.”Sonia Voskuil, a Cambridge music teacher who met Crout at the Memorial Church 15 years ago, called him “the conscience of the church,” a sentiment that has been making the rounds since his unexpected death. “I miss him very much. His presence. It’s a loss,” she said. “He knew about community, and he passed that on to us.”Voskuil met Crout just after he returned from six months in rehab. He was hit by a car on a Cambridge Common crosswalk, and the accident left him with a limp and one drooping eye ― a facial feature that he managed to turn into part of his charm, a physical analog to his wry humor.Into old age Crout kept the lean frame of the high-mileage jogger he had once been. He was a serious man, and fiercely intellectual. He was also a dapper sartorial holdout. His Brooks Brothers shirts, striped ties, and tweed jackets could make him seem like a dashing apparition from a Harvard long past. Even in winter, said Suter, Crout set off from his apartment near Cambridge Common without a hat, and refused to button his coat.A few hours after his death, Diana Eck and Dorothy Austin — masters at Lowell House who had known Crout since the 1970s, and who were regular visitors in his final days — sent around an email. Soon, an ad hoc memorial service transpired in their quarters. “It was quite a spiritual moment,” said Connelly. “People just came and said what they remembered, what they treasured.”Eck, a scholar of comparative religion and Indian studies, remembered Crout most as a fervent churchgoer and an eager socializer at community discussion groups, teas, high tables, and gatherings with students at Lowell. Every year, she added, he “was the first in line to buy a meal plan,” since the lunches created the ideal social architecture for conversation. But it also told something of his personal life. “I don’t think Bill was a cook,” said Griffin.Suter was among the mourners at the Lowell House mini-memorial. “They put a log on the fire and invited anyone to talk,” he said of Eck and Austin. “Everyone had another piece of his puzzle.”It was not such an easy one to solve, said Griffin, who marveled at how his longtime friend could be so social and so private at the same time. “There’s that component of him that’s very surprising,” he said, noting that to his knowledge, the one-time piano soloist never played for anyone. “He was a good listener, a fond questioner, but a very private person.”Two days before he died, on the last day he could talk, Crout was aware of the blizzards seesawing over the region, dumping heavy snow. He looked over at Suter and asked, “How’s your roof?”When words failed him, Crout devised a code, signing “MP” in the air to ask about Morning Prayers. By Wednesday morning, Feb. 11, he lay still, unresponsive to friends singing hymns at his bedside.But the friends were still there, as they will be again Friday at Memorial Church. Said Hamner, still moved and amazed, “I was holding his hand when he died.”Never married, Crout is survived by a brother, Robert, of Huntsville, Texas. Shortly after his sibling’s death, Robert related what could easily serve as an epitaph for Crout’s grave in Hattiesburg, Miss.: “He was a great family man, even though he had no family of his own.”Gifts in any amount are welcome for the fund set up in Crout’s memory, and to honor Paul Tillich at Harvard. Make checks out to Harvard Divinity School, write “Tillich-Crout Memorial Fund” on the memo line, and send to Harvard Divinity School, ATTN: Loren Gary, 45 Francis Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138.last_img read more

Biodiesel one slick solution, but more to come

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first_imgTeams of undergraduate students huddled quietly around the gray metal desks in the teaching labs at Harvard’s Science Center. Each group was creating a calorimeter out of a used soda can and scavenged Styrofoam cups to determine the energy density and efficiency of the biodiesel they had extracted the week before from waste fryer oil provided by Annenberg Dining Hall.The students’ research factors into both scholarship and institutional action as Harvard works to generate solutions to the challenge of climate change. They have joined the ranks of Harvard Kennedy School faculty member James Stock, who received one of the first Climate Change Solutions Fund grants for his research investigating market impediments to biofuels penetration. Institutionally, the students are looking at the University’s 2004 decision to fuel its shuttles with biodiesel, which emerged as an alternative fuel source for vehicles because it creates fewer greenhouse gas emissions and reduces pollution.“The biodiesel lesson definitely personalized the manner in which we utilize energy here on campus,” said Victor Agbafe ’19. “In many instances, when we are thinking about how Harvard as an institution is trying its best to set new trends in saving energy, it can be abstract, and we can’t often observe tangible examples of how this is implemented on a daily basis.”Students involved in the teaching lab’s biodiesel experiment said the work has given them new perspectives on the larger local, regional, and global issues of energy and sustainability.The story of how waste vegetable oil from Harvard’s freshman dining hall ended up being used in one of the College’s most popular chemistry classes began as a collaboration between the Office for Sustainability’s (OFS) FAS Green Program and Sirinya Matchacheep, Ph.D. ’07, the director of instructional programs in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology. Matchacheep, an active OFS Green Team member, wanted to incorporate lessons from the campus commitment to sustainability into the curriculum of the teaching labs classes she facilitates. She partnered with sustainability coordinator Anthony Michetti to identify several creative ways to do just that for the nearly 400 students taking the Chemistry Department’s entry-level PS1 and PS11 classes.,“Energy and sustainability are both interesting and relevant,” said Matchacheep. “By incorporating these topics and real-world examples from the campus into our classroom, students can walk out of the lab and understand what is being talked about in the news, and have the tools to make informed decisions.”Students heard directly from Michetti about Harvard’s Sustainability Plan and the goal set in 2008 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2016. They learned how blackberries and raspberries used as part of a solar cell lab were composted, providing additional insight into waste reduction efforts across campus. Tours of the University’s Blackstone Steam Plant and chilled-water facilities gave a hands-on demonstration of energy systems and the chemistry of the heating and cooling cycle.Harvard’s faculty and students are increasingly using the campus and surrounding community as living laboratories for understanding the multifaceted problems posed by global climate change and sustainable development. In the past year, the Office for Sustainability has increased resources and attention to facilitate a greater number of these projects to provide valuable experiential learning opportunities and inform the work being done on campus to reduce energy and enhance well-being.“Previously, I wasn’t very familiar with how what we usually consider waste on campus can be used for sustainable purposes,” said Jesper Ke ’19. “Participating in this lab and hearing directly from those at Harvard working on sustainability has made me more mindful of the role that we students can also play in helping with these efforts.”last_img read more

Michael Polish to Direct Speed-The-Plow Film

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first_imgLindsay Lohan & Richard Schiff in ‘Speed-The-Plow’ in the West End View Comments Speed-The-Plow is a step closer to hitting the big screen. Michael Polish, whose films include The Astronaut Farmer, Twin Falls Idaho and Northfork, has been tapped to direct the film adaptation of David Mamet’s play, according to Deadline.Plans for the movie were originally reported in April 2015. Filming is scheduled to begin in July; no word yet on casting. Polish’s brother Mark often co-produces and appears in his projects.Speed-the-Plow focuses on two high-powered Hollywood executives, Charlie Fox and Bobby Gould, who have come up from the mailroom together. Charlie brings Bobby a surefire hit with a major star attached. Bobby seems certain to give the green light, until his beautiful new secretary, Karen, gets involved. A revival, featuring Lindsay Lohan, Richard Schiff and Nigel Lindsay, played London’s West End last year.last_img read more

Fridays on the Fly

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first_imgDifferent fly anglers have different goals in their pursuit of fish. To some it’s very important to catch fish, many fish—big ones—any way possible. To others it is to catch that fish. The one that makes you work hard and demands precision.But for many of us, it’s all about the experience, the location, the peace and quiet—not just the fish. No matter our separate goals, our common ground is to enjoy ourselves in the outdoors and have fun. As a guide, I often see people struggling to get past the nuts and bolts of fly fishing in search of that sweet spot where things run smoothly and joy of the pursuit emerges.Efficiency in fly fishing leads to success, plain and simple. It may take a while to develop, but when it clicks, the light bulb often illuminates a new way of thinking and doing. Multi-taskers often excel in the fly fishing world. I know that if I can watch both my flies and my line during my drift while picking up slack I not only have a better chance of hooking that fish when he eats, but I can instantly keep the line tight, watching the fish run, feeling the rod, and playing him correctly.Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 10.15.39 AMWhen I am guiding, I strive to share my own systems with my clients. These people will often return a year or two later, and in that time span they have built upon my systems and developed their own. That’s the beauty of sharing in fly fishing. There is no one way of fishing correctly. It’s personal, it’s developed over time, shared and morphed; when you really find it, it has style.Organization is a virtue, and it’s one of the most important elements in my fly fishing. Yes, disorganized people catch fish too, but organized people often enjoy themselves more, have more time to soak in the surroundings, pay closer attention to clues on the water, and avoid frustration.Preparation is key. Did you have a good breakfast? Hydrate enough? Do you have all the gear—flies, leaders, tippet, floatant, etc.—that you need to be successful? Did you bring a map with you so you know where you’re going when your GPS drops or phone dies? Have you read up on the fishery or spoken to people that may know it better? Is all your equipment in working order and do you know how to rig it properly? When someone comes into our shop complaining about a less than satisfactory day on the water, more often than not they answered no to at least one of the questions above.Keeping your equipment organized and possibly having a backup stash of beater gear in your vehicle may save the day if something gets left behind. Organizing your fly boxes will help you find what you need precisely and quickly.Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 10.15.57 AMAlways check your knots, if they break, try tying them again, slower and more methodically. Try and develop a muscle memory and patterns in your hands and fingers for tying knots that work. When they work, tie them like that every time, and it will become second nature. Know three or four knots like a boss and have confidence in them.When you approach a new spot on the stream take a second to look all around you. Up, down, forwards, and backwards. Know where your hazards are and make a point to avoid them. This may be achieved by employing different casts or simply by moving five feet. Fools rush in, and so do those that put their bugs in the tree behind them on the first cast without looking. Take your time and you will avoid frustration, which can turn a perfectly good day sour in a snap.Finally, it is imperative to know where your fly is at all times. Whether you are executing a drift or moving from spot to spot, treat your flies like deadly weapons. Utilize them as tools and put them away so as not to lose or damage them when not in action.A simple method that I teach people to use in rigging your rod for movement goes like this: reel in until you have about 1.5-2 feet of fly line out of the rod tip, take your terminal fly and attach the hook to your second or third guide up from the cork, grab the big loop of line and walk it back with your hand and place the loop around the foot of your reel, then reel in any excess line. Everything should be tight and well kept along the rod. When you are ready to fish, reverse the steps listed above, but don’t grab for your fly first; it should be the last thing that hits the water before your cast.It’s often the simple things that bring us the most joy. Fly fishing, as intricate as it seems, has awarded many people, including myself, with countless moments of elation that typically come from keeping our systems and methodologies simple and precise.  Seek to develop your understanding of the tools at your disposal and knowledge in pursuit of fish. Along the way, when you find something that works, do it a lot, share it with others, and put some style into it.Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 10.26.12 AMScott Osborne is a fly fishing guide at the Albemarle Angler in Charlottesville, Virginia. Check them out on Facebook.last_img read more

Briefs

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first_imgBriefs Florida A&M University will host one of the 17 regional tournaments leading up to the American Intercollegiate Mock Trial Association’s national competition and the school is seeking volunteers to help officiate the tournament.Twenty-six teams from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and Tennessee will compete in the FAMU- hosted regional February 27-29 in Tallahassee. Nearly 160 judges will be needed to preside over and score the tournament.The tournament’s four rounds are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. February 27. Should you decide to participate, you will be given a brief orientation to the case and the rules of competition before each trial. Each trial lasts approximately three hours.This year the students will argue a criminal case: Tony Sturmanis was a rising star in the world of professional hockey. Tragically, he was killed during a playoff game in Midlands City following a fight with Michael Harmon. Harmon was later indicted on homicide charges. His wife, Victoria, had recently been romantically linked to Sturmanis. Also, Harmon lost a lucrative contract to Sturmanis just hours before the confrontation during the game.Those interested in volunteering may contact Tyra Mason at (850) 599-3664 or via e-mail at [email protected] CLE credit is available for participation in the tournament.Kitchen to lead Second Circuit’s new Professionalism Committee Chief Judge Charles A. Francis has reappointed the Second Judicial Circuit Committee on Professionalism. The committee ­— a Florida Supreme Court mandate for each judicial circuit — is headed by Chair E.C. Deeno Kitchen, and seeks to assess the status and conditions of professionalism within the Second Circuit.To promote professionalism and ethics with the establishment of such a committee, members agree, accomplishes several goals.“It heightens everyone’s awareness; it helps to raise the bar for professional behavior; and it provides a mechanism for identifying problems early,” said Mike Glazer, a member of the committee, who also represents the Second Circuit on the Bar’s Board of Governors.Glazer said one of the primary goals of the committee is to be able to recognize situations where an attorney’s conduct is not up to the level the Bar expects, and encourage change before things get out of control.Without an immediate idea of all of the issues to be addressed, Kitchen said the committee plans to survey the lawyers in the circuit to assess their concerns.“Essentially, we want to know, what can be better and what can we do to make it better?,” Kitchen said.Working with the circuit’s previously appointed Bench/Bar Liaison Circuit Committee, Kitchen hopes the two panels will be able to coordinate efforts to better identify issues to be addressed.Glazer said that with the number of government and private sector attorneys in the circuit, the committee should be meaningful to all lawyers.The three principles that encompass what the committee aims for are “professionalism, ethics, and civility,” said Kitchen, who takes pride in the committee’s efforts to make a difference.“That’s what we’re all about — helping in any way we can.”Court interpreter training set for Panama City Imagine facing a judge in a foreign country where you cannot speak the language. The judge will decide your fate, but you cannot understand her and she cannot understand you. That is a daily reality for thousands of immigrants living in Florida.To lessen this problem, the state court system has begun a series of programs to recruit and train foreign language interpreters. The next program will be held January 23-25 in Panama City. The registration deadline is December 12. Those who successfully complete the program will be listed on the State Courts’ Registry of Tested Interpreters.During the two-and-a-half day program in Panama City, participants will receive training about how the courts operate and how interpreters must work during court sessions. This will be followed by a written exam testing participant’s English proficiency.The registration fee is $150 for Florida residents and $300 for others. For more information visit www.flcourts.org/osca/divisions/interpret/index.html.Scholarship program puts young people on fast track Assistant Editor A deposition may be in his briefcase, but racing is in his blood.To facilitate the matriculation of young drivers into a new age of racing, Bradenton lawyer Leonard “Q” McCue, along with his wife Barbara, founded the Q Motorsports Family Student Racer Scholarship Program. Designed to promote continuing education and community service activities, McCue believes the scholarship program, which is overseen by a board of directors, will better prepare the youth both on and off the track.McCue said he can remember when his passion for racing was more accessible.The auto racing industry has shifted gears from the sandy beaches of yesteryear Daytona to the two and one-half miles of pavement that it is today.“What I observed years ago,” said McCue, “(is that) there was a mentality out there that all you needed to do was get in a jalopy and race around the dirt and you could be another Dale Earnhardt.”That’s not the case today. With advancements in technology and an increased fan base, the auto racing sport has become a multi-faceted, multi-national, multi-sponsorship phenomenon, making it more difficult for those interested to get involved.“That’s the new image,” said McCue. “They (drivers) know as much about computers as they do racing.”Students in McCue’s program are judged in three categories in consideration for scholarships: grades at school, sanctioned motorsports participation, and community service/self-promotional activities. The scholarships are awarded to Florida students ages 5 to 21 for tuition, books, and dorm fees at vocational/technical schools, colleges, universities, or junior colleges. The monies are reserved in a savings account until the drug- and crime-free recipients enroll in college.Since the program’s inception in 1997, more than $60,000 has been raised. Beyond dollars, McCue sees a group of young people who have faith in themselves, something he believes is a more accurate assessment of the rewards of the program.“I think that the success can be measured by the number of young people we have in college,” said McCue, noting that the scholarships offer a necessary education to those who otherwise might not be able to afford it.Aside from balancing academics and hard work on the racetrack, students in the program mature in their everyday lives, learning sportsmanship and self-promotion, he said.The spirit of self-promotion and entrepreneurship is something McCue wants to instill with his program. Late NASCAR driver Alan Kulwicki serves as inspiration for McCue, both as a lawyer and in his personal life:“He raised his own money, ran his own team, and became a NASCAR champion,” said McCue.In addition to gains in self-confidence, the students also learn from each other, something McCue refers to as a virtual fraternity of kids. Incredibly supportive parents are another reason the attitude is so positive, he added.“They (the parents) spend a lot of time on the road with these kids,” said McCue. “The challenges they (the kids) meet on a weekend don’t compare to the challenges they encounter sitting on their living room couches and playing a video game.”The McCues consider Casey Johnson a prime example of the goals of the program. Raised by his grandfather, Johnson didn’t know how he would ever be able to afford college.An 18-year-old honor student who has dedicated numerous hours to his community, Johnson understands the importance of securing his education, in addition to becoming a professional race car driver.Now attending the University of North Carolina with engineering aspirations, Johnson has maintained his interest in racing, having established contacts with Hendrick Motorsports, Jeff Gordon’s race team.“We are hoping that we have another Jeff Gordon here,” said McCue. For more information, call 1-800-332-1992, or write Q Motorsports Family Scholarship Program, 524 9th St. W., Bradenton 34205.Lawyer works to help Jews in Argentina FAMU seeks volunteers for mock trial competition November 15, 2003 Daniel Staesser Assistant Editor Regular News Argentina may be thousands of miles away on a map, but for Miami attorney Richard Bernstein his heritage has never been closer to his heart.Co-chair of the United Jewish Communities National Argentinean Response Task Force, Bernstein was asked to chair the task force in December 2001. Designed to provide money, food, shelter, and education to the ailing population of Jews in Argentina, the task force has raised $89 million toward their rescue and relief since January 2002.Bernstein took on the challenge during the aftermath of the country’s economic collapse in late 2001. The governmental breakdown left Argentina in poverty and its education system in disarray. The Jewish segment of this population nears 200,000, the fourth largest Jewish community in the world.When you don’t have the time to help, “you make the time; there’s no better answer than that,” Bernstein said.Bernstein said because of the task force fund-raising efforts — which include the efforts of South Florida leaders such as Michael Adler, Norman Braman, Ezra Katz, and Aaron Podhurst — the community today has food, shelter, and medicine, as well as a more functional educational system and a decent standard of living.“It appears as though things have stopped getting worse,” said Bernstein, who noted that welfare had been on a steady ascent, and tuition rose so high nobody could afford an education. The task force provided scholarships, job training, and emergency welfare for those who needed it. Since the relief, the economy has maintained an even keel, and welfare has declined.“People are cautiously optimistic,” said Bernstein, who also said that the task force provides the option for Jews to leave the country if they desire.Providing finances for those who wish to relocate to Miami, or even Israel, the task force does everything it can to provide for the Jewish people an exodus from their oppression, he said. For more information, contact the Greater Miami Jewish Federation at (305) 576-4000.last_img read more

Does an automated referral program make sense for your credit union?

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first_imgWhen I first joined RewardStream, I admit I was little confused about how automated referral programs worked. I didn’t quite understand what it meant to automate a process that humans do naturally. I’d seen referral programs run in the past, and it seemed pretty simple. Reach out to your customers, tell them you’ll reward them when they refer their friends, and wait for those friends to show up and make a purchase. It seemed like a pretty organic process, based on the natural relationship between people.Throughout the course of our daily lives, we are constantly referring our friends and families, and being referred by them: from products and services to ideas and experiences. It’s a commendable human trait, to share our positive (and negative) experiences with the people closest to us. In fact, when I sit back and think about it, I realize I am constantly benefitting from the knowledge that my peers and loved ones share with me.All Trust is Made Equal; Some is More Equal Than OthersIt’s probably fair to say there’s a certain domain of trustworthiness when it comes to providing accurate and pragmatic advice. Some people are very good at recommending experiences – vacation destinations, hotels, airlines, and so on. Others are experts in certain niches, and can provide assistance when I need very specific advice or guidance. For particularly big decisions, I’ll often solicit the opinions of many people before making my choice. continue reading » 39SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

La Liga television audiences soar 48% in first week back

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first_imgIn Europe, audiences swelled by over 56%, with the biggest spike (130%) coming from Belgium, which cancelled its domestic season due to the pandemic.The league’s domestic viewing figures experienced a more modest increase of 12%.The most popular match was Real Madrid’s 3-1 win over Eibar, a league spokesman said, followed by Barcelona’s 4-0 victory over Real Mallorca and Sevilla’s 2-0 triumph over city rivals Real Betis, the first match since the season resumed.”We feel privileged to be able to take to the field again, and we’re very happy to have the opportunity to offer live sports entertainment at a time when there are few events like this around the world,” said La Liga’s president Javier Tebas. “We hope that other competitions in other regions will also start soon, because it’s important for the fans and the industry.”Oscar Mayo, director of marketing and international development for the league, added: “We’re very pleased with the exponential growth in the figures for La Liga’s international audience.”We knew that fans around the world were keen to enjoy the excitement and entertainment we offer.”Spain is one of the worst affected countries in the world with over 27,000 deaths due to the novel coronavirus and 245,000 infections.It was able to get its season back up and running thanks to a joint effort from La Liga, Spain’s soccer federation and the government’s department for sport.The Spanish top-flight is the second of Europe’s top five leagues to restart after the Bundesliga, which also posted record audiences in its first weekend back last month.England’s Premier League resumed on Wednesday while Italy’s Serie A returns on Saturday.  Spanish football’s international viewing figures have increased by over 48% since the season returned after being halted for three months due to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizing body La Liga said on Thursday.Citing a study by analytics firm Nielsen Sports of the first round of matches since the campaign resumed on June 11 without fans, La Liga said its biggest audience bounce came in Africa, where it received a 73% boost in viewers.Viewing audiences increased by 72% in Asia, where La Liga has had a free-to-air deal with Facebook in the Indian sub-continent since 2018.center_img Topics :last_img read more

PREMIUMNew Kampung Akuarium brings hope for better living

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first_imgFor years, residents of Kampung Akuarium in Penjaringan, North Jakarta, have had countless meetings discussing the fate of their settlement since a forced eviction in 2016. Indonesia’s 75th Independence Day on Monday seemed to mark a turning point for the residents because on the occasion, the Jakarta administration held a groundbreaking ceremony to reconstruct Kampung Akuarium despite controversies surrounding the project’s legality.Kampung Akuarium is among 21 kampung prioritized for revitalization in Jakarta under Governor Anies Baswedan.Unlike their previous settlement – predominantly landed houses in informal urban settings – the residents’ future home in Kampung Akuarium will be much different. They have decided to rebuild the area with a kampung susun (vertical village) concept.A resident and coordinator of local community forum … Topics : Linkedin Google Log in with your social account Facebook LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? #kampung Kampung-Akuarium slum #slums #Jakartalast_img read more

Office workers unconvinced of stricter curbs

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first_imgIndonesia’s capital Jakarta entered another period of large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) on Monday with most office workers forced to once again shelter in place, but some remain unconvinced that the curbs will be able to contribute much to their protection – unless there is strict enforcement.Jasmine, 26, who works as an interpreter, said she did not feel “protected enough” while working in her client’s office.She has personally tried to maintain personal hygiene and worn a mask whenever she could, but her workplace environment still undermined her efforts, as the institution she works for still receives guests very often. As a regular visitor, she doubted there was enough room for her to stay safe in her client’s office, even if the company complied with prevailing regulations and limited the number of people working to half the capacity of the space, as was done when the first PSBB measures were enacted in April.“There are still people smoking around the office building. Maintaining physical distance is also difficult. I sometimes reprimand people who sit in a chair [I was using] but they would get offended,” she told The Jakarta Post.The new restrictions did not help her feel safe from COVID-19 transmission, due to the absence of strict enforcement.For Kartika, an employee at a government agency, enforcing health protocols within office spaces was not enough to contain transmission; each person must also take their own precautions. “We can catch COVID-19 in a variety of situations and environments, so there is always going to be a risk of infection. It depends largely on our awareness and commitment,” she told the Post.“Sometimes it is the person that chooses to neglect [health protocols].”Under the current PSBB, workplaces in 11 essential sectors – including health, food, energy, communications, logistics and basic needs retail – are allowed to remain open at half the capacity of their respective office space.Activities outside these sectors, such as government offices, must have no more than 25 percent of employees working at the office at the same time.During the first PSBB that lasted from April to June 3, workplaces in nonessential sectors had to fully implement the work-from-home policy. When the economy gradually reopened, companies were allowed to have their office spaces filled at half capacity.During the first PSBB period, the Jakarta Manpower, Transmigration and Energy Agency recorded that 4,074 companies and institutions – which together employed a total of 1.07 million workers – had either enforced the work-from-home policy or slimmed down their operations.But it remains unclear how many workers were actually working remotely during that period.With the return to PSBB, agency head Andri Yansyah estimates that there could be over 600,000 employees still working in their office spaces. The agency said Jakarta had nearly 80,000 companies and institutions in total, together employing some 2.1 million people.Around 3.2 million Greater Jakarta residents are commuters, according to the 2019 Greater Jakarta Commuter Survey by Statistics Indonesia (BPS). Of that figure, 2.5 million are office workers who commute daily.On Monday morning, state-owned commuter line operator PT KCI reported a 19 percent decline in passenger numbers compared to last week. The decline in ridership was seen in several major railway stations including in the Bogor, Citayam and Bekasi stations in West Java.The Jakarta Police’s traffic unit found that traffic density in the capital did not change much from last week, but the police said it was too early to say whether commuters were shifting from public to private transportation or whether the PSBB measures were failing.Jakarta Public Order Agency (Satpol PP) head Arifin recently said monitoring violations of health protocols in office areas was considered a challenge as the agency could not regularly enter nonpublic spaces. He encouraged employees to report violations using the city’s smart mobile app Jakarta Kini (JAKI), which will keep their identity anonymous.The tighter curbs were reinstated – albeit with some measure of leniency – after the city administration announced it had to “hit the emergency brake” on Wednesday last week, giving employers a few days to prepare.Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan singled out commercial office spaces as a focus for restrictions on Sunday. Previously, the city saw up to 90 office clusters emerge as curbs were gradually eased.Tempo daily reported on Aug. 9 that at least 1,081 cases of COVID-19 transmission had originated in office clusters.Jakarta has recorded a daily average of over 1,000 new cases this month and registered at least 55,099 infections with 1,418 deaths from COVID-19 since the pandemic began, national COVID-19 task force data show, with its transmission rate seeing a continued rise since the city gradually relaxed curbs on specific sectors under a “transitional” phase two months after the initial PSBB period.With accurate data still a problem, the Jakarta administration reported 1,492 new cases and six deaths on Sunday, bringing the city’s official tally to 54,864 confirmed cases, with 4,649 patients hospitalized.The PSBB announcement sparked concerns over the possible collapse of the country’s economy, with central government officials and the business community expressing various levels of displeasure at the PSBB policy.As the capital and the beating heart of the national economy, the primacy of Jakarta cannot be understated.The city continues to contribute the most to the Indonesian economy compared to other regions, with its regional domestic product accounting for 17.17 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) in the second quarter, according to Jakarta data from Statistics Indonesia (BPS).But Anies cited the increasing number of daily new cases and a decreasing number of free hospital beds as the main reasons for declaring a return to stricter curbs.Coordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto has said the police and the military will help monitor health protocols in office spaces.In response, Andri said the agency would cooperate with the police and military officers should its officials meet any resistance from any office management during spot-checks.He also encouraged companies or members of the public to report any violation of health protocols to his agency.“In order to apply more effective PSBB, not only do we receive reports from companies but we also perform spot-checks and take reports from the general public,” he said.“Sometimes employees worry about the situation in their office. They can report to us directly or via an app, then we will follow up the report.”Topics :last_img read more