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CARICOM not doing enough to support cricket – WICB’s Nanthan

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first_imgGEORGETOWN, Guyana (CMC): The Vice-President of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB), Emmanuel Nanthan, says regional governments are not doing enough to support the development of cricket in the region. Nanthan’s declaration comes as the Dave Cameron-led WICB and CARICOM appear to remain at loggerheads over a recommendation calling for the dissolution of the board by a review panel setup by CARICOM and the WICB. The WICB appears to be preparing for a legal battle with CARICOM to resist the recom-mendations of the Review panel by hiring Dominican lawyer Anthony Astaphan. Nanthan is insisting that the problems with West Indies cricket have little to do with WICB’s governance, but a lack of resources from regional governments to fund training. “It costs the WICB about US$1 million to train a cricketer from the Under-15 level to the elite level in international cricket,” said Nanthan, a sports administrator for the past 20 years. “Eighty-seven per cent of all amounts spent by the Windwards and Leewards in age group tournaments is represented by accommodation costs, air and sea travel costs and the cost of meals for players who are away from their homes. No wonder on an annual basis the Windwards and Leewards are always at the bottom of the table in the early rounds of the regional competition.” A recent meeting in Grenada between CARICOM prime ministers and a WICB delegation to discuss the panel’s governance report made little progress except for an agreement for future meetings. WICB’s defiance appears to have been fired-up following a subsequent board meeting in St Lucia, which also discussed the governance report. “Did the academics look into this? Are the nation states encouraging cricket in the communities?” asked Nanthan. “I say all this so you can understand the costs of the opportunity, which you have been offered through the opportunity of the Professional Cricket League.” STATE’S ROLE The WICB vice-president added: “Early education in sports in schools is the responsibility of the State. The responsibility of training to achieve successful performance and results for national teams in regional and international sports is the responsibility of the governments.” Nanthan says the WICB is prepared to make amendments, but stressed that only share-holder territories can legally dissolve the WICB. “We are prepared to make some changes as we did following previous Governance Reports,” he told Kaieteur News in Guyana. “However, on the basis of a corporate review and legal advice, only the shareholders of the WICB can dissolve the company – the WICB. And similarly only shareholders can appoint new directors to the board, whether they are independent or shareholders directors.”last_img read more

Arcata JV tops Mack

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first_imgDylan Kile dropped 17 points, Aidan Atkins-Salazar added 15 more and the Arcata High junior varsity boys basketball team knocked off its fiercest rival, McKinleyville, 54-42 Tuesday night at McKinleyville High.Tuesday’s game was the first meeting of the year between the two teams and McKinleyville head coach Mark Sundberg said at this point in the season, it’s all about finding out what he has.“At this time every year, we’re looking to see what we have as a team,” Sundberg said. ” It’s about …last_img

Evolutionist Lost Faith Over Flawed Geology Lesson

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first_imgA college student’s Biblical faith could not survive a geology lesson that seemed to offer convincing proof that the earth was old – much older than the Bible said it was.  This test of his faith was a tipping point.  He began to question the Bible, and ended up becoming a prominent evolutionist.  His books and articles present a halfway sympathetic view of his former creationist friends, but he is convinced now that science has disproved the Bible and established the truth of evolution.  But now, the rest of the story: that evidence that challenged his faith back then has since been shown to be wrongly interpreted – so wrong, in fact, that even secular geologists now agree with the creationist interpretation.    The man is Ron Numbers, now a professor of the history of science and medicine at the University of Wisconsin.  The geology lesson was about the fossil forests in Yellowstone.  In the 1970s, geologists taught that what looked like 30 separate forests had grown on top of each other, one at a time, only to be buried by periodic volcanic eruptions.  A sign at Specimen Ridge in the park explained this as a matter of fact.  Estimates ranged from 20,000 years minimum to 30,000, or 50,000 years or more were required – in any case, far more than a conservative Genesis timeframe could allow.    On May 18, 1980, an explosive event with profound repercussions for geological science took place.  Mt. St. Helens erupted.  In one day, this event literally overturned the long-age interpretation of Specimen Ridge.  In the Roadside Geology book about Yellowstone sold in the park, geologist William Fritz described his reaction to mudflows he witnessed along the Toutle River in Washington.  “It was just like Yellowstone!” he exclaimed.  Since that widely-observed natural experiment in catastrophic geology, the work of volcanic mudflows has become the leading explanation for how the Yellowstone fossil forests were emplaced, layers and all.  The old sign that explained the old theory to millions of park visitors is long gone.    When telling his life story, Ron Numbers has pointed to that premature lesson about the Yellowstone fossil forests taking tens of thousands of years to form as the incident that began turning him away from creationism to evolutionism.  Most recently, in an interview in Salon Magazine published January 2, he was asked at what point his ideas about creation began to change.  He responded,I wish I knew.  There are a few moments that proved crucial for me.  I went to Berkeley in the ’60s as a graduate student in history and learned to read critically.  That had a profound influence on me.  I was also exposed to critiques of young earth creationism.  The thing that stands out in my memory as being decisive was hearing a lecture about the fossil forest of Yellowstone, given by a creationist who’d just been out there to visit.  He found that for the 30 successive layers you needed — assuming the most rapid rates of decomposition of lava into soil and the most rapid rates of growth for the trees that came back in that area — at least 20,000 to 30,000 years.  The only alternative the creationists had to offer was that during the year of Noah’s flood, these whole stands of forest trees came floating in, one on top of another, until you had about 30 stacked up.  And that truly seemed incredible to me.  Just trying to visualize what that had been like during the year of Noah’s flood made me smile.He went on to describe how he and a fellow Bible-believing student wrestled all night with the implications of this explanation.  “Before dawn, we both decided the evidence was too strong,” he said.  This was a crucial night for me because I realized I was abandoning … the authority of Genesis.”    He did not indicate whether he had ever heard “the rest of the story” about Yellowstone.And thus, an evolutionist professor, who writes books against creationists, was molded – partly but significantly from a flawed interpretation of geological evidence.  Ron Numbers is the embodiment of a fable we told in our 11/13/2006 commentary.  An evolutionary explanation is presented as a matter of fact; it shakes a student’s faith; the damage is done; he “sees the light” of evolution and becomes a convert.  Then, years later, new evidence comes out showing that the creation explanation was trustworthy all along.    In both that case and this one, we are not saying that secular geologists have come running back to Genesis confessing their sins and saying the Bible-believers were right.  Of course they continue to talk long ages; the Yellowstone eruptions were umpty hundred thousand years ago with multiple episodes, the Nevada eruptions were similarly age-old, etc. (as if they were there with a stopwatch).  What’s important to remember is that data does not interpret itself.  Look again at the other story links at the end of the 11/13/2006 commentary.  Despite geologists’ philosophical commitment to the geologic column and its evolutionary foundation, they continually revise their stories, sometimes overturning them completely, as new evidence comes in (e.g., last week, 01/03/2007).  It just so happens that the latest interpretations of the Yellowstone and Nevada deposits are consistent with a catastrophic, flood-geology, young-earth view.  As such, they present neither a necessary nor sufficient reason to doubt the trustworthiness of the Bible.  The sudden catastrophic model is superior in many respects to the slow-and-gradual model.  Since the Bible-believing scientists propounded this idea before it became the new consensus, even when Ron considered it incredible and laughable, and no one took it seriously at the time, you could even say that in this instance the Bible-believing, young-earth creationists have been vindicated.It’s ironic that the old-age view was presented by “a creationist.”  Obviously not all creationists accept the Genesis timetable.  But creationists who subscribe to an old-earth or theistic-evolution view should ponder the impact of that view on Ron as a student.  It did not help him resolve conflicts between the Bible and “science” – it eroded his trust in the Bible completely.  Some old-earth creationists like Davis Young have touted the Yellowstone fossil forests as proof positive that the earth could not be fitted into a few thousand years.  Now they have egg on their faces.  Regardless of one’s position on the age of the earth, one lesson is clear: what science is claiming today is always subject to change.  Using today’s consensus to argue against the Bible’s history, which has withstood scrutiny longer than any scientific claim, is risky business and of doubtful support for Biblical worldview construction.Ron Numbers’ view of creationism is more nuanced and sympathetic than that of the typical Darwinist, owing to his personal experience.  But since that fateful geology lesson, it appears he began interpreting subsequent scientific claims through a new lens – an evolutionary, materialist lens.  One can only wonder how differently his life would have turned out had someone rushed into that class at the end of the lecture, yelling, “Wait!  Mt. St. Helens has just erupted, and billions of tons of logs are being deposited in layers along the Toutle River in a matter of hours!  It’s just like Yellowstone!”    As stated in the 11/13/2006 commentary, unbelief often becomes a deep trench once it starts.  It is highly doubtful Ron Numbers would retrace his worldview journey back to that point if someone were to tell him about the paradigm shift at Yellowstone.  By this time he has cut too deep a trench to climb out.  His reputation among his peers is also on the line.  Few people who publish books taking strong positions ever change their minds.  The twig is bent; the die is cast.  He is no longer the Learnuh, he is the Mosstuh.  He has seen the light.  Miracles can happen, but the new Yellowstone story is unlikely to make someone who touts the so-called “overwhelming evidence for evolution” change sides at this late date.  Pastors, parents, and Christian teachers wanting to prepare students for adulthood should take some sober lessons from this case study.    In the first place, Biblical history should be presented as more than just stories.  It needs to be shown to correspond to actual historical events.  The new Archaeological Study Bible is a great resource to show the correspondence between Biblical history and archaeology and history from other sources.    Secondly, Christian students should not be insulated from contradictory ideas.  Conflicts are inevitable anyway, so it is very counterproductive to avoid them.  Children and teens want to know their beliefs are sound.  Instruction about scientific controversies must be age-appropriate, of course, but in Ron’s case, why did it take college age at Berkeley (of all places) for him to discover critical thinking?  That should have started before age 10.  (Note: “Critical thinking” at liberal universities often becomes imbalanced questioning of traditional values and religious beliefs – see quote by Berkeley law professor Phillip Johnson in the header of the Baloney Detector).  It is by facing difficulties head-on that confidence in one’s worldview is built.  Like Johnson has often teased, we should teach students more about evolution than the schools want them to hear!  A student can’t understand our modern world without understanding Darwinism and evolutionary theory and the best arguments put forth to support it.  But, unlike in public schools, they should also get the scientific arguments against it.  A vast majority of American citizens believe that.    Thirdly, and even more important, students should learn the limits of science.  They need to develop a healthy skepticism of the ability of fallible human science to make knowledge claims about the past (or even the present, for that matter).*Ron grew up in a Seventh-Day Adventist church.  Though outside the mainstream of Protestant tradition, SDAs are staunch Bible believers.  However much his well-meaning parents and teachers might have thought they were protecting students by teaching only the young-earth view and avoiding contradictory scientific views from secular geology and evolutionary biology, it is clear in hindsight that insulation from challenge can backfire.  By high school and college age, young adults are questioning the beliefs they were taught as children anyway.  We should help them learn how to do it right.  Dodging hard questions or making a child feel guilty for doubt is a bad example.  It gives the impression that Christianity is anti-intellectual, or too weak to stand up under examination.  The great Christian physicist James Clerk Maxwell believed that Christianity was the only system that allowed full and free investigation, without sacred spots that were off limits to scrutiny.    Chuck Colson and Nancy Pearcey gave a memorable example of facing controversy in chapter 5 of their book How Now Shall We Live? (Tyndale, 1999).  They portrayed a father confronted by his daughter’s questions about evolution.  He didn’t have ready answers at the time.  But he did a brave thing that made an impression on her: he answered, “I don’t know, but I’ll find out.”  And he let her know he was willing to lay his own faith on the line to find answers.  So with his daughter, he did a research project on the evidence for creation and taught her more than just answers to her specific questions: he taught her that a Christian need not be afraid of investigating the evidence.  He showed her that the way to handle a doubt is to confront it with research and honest analysis of both sides of a controversy.If Ron Numbers had left the safety of church and home armed with critical thinking skills and an arsenal of sound strategies to consider skeptical claims fairly, how much different would his life had been?  It’s hard to say.  Some students will rebel for other reasons: perhaps, a rationalization to explore their lusts, or a desire to fit in with a peer group.  It appears, though, that Ron has maintained a soft spot for his childhood worldview, as if nostalgic for it.  Some ardent anticreationists grew up in a church but were completely unprepared for the allure of evolutionary propaganda.  They not only embraced it readily, but became ardent foes of Christianity.  E. O. Wilson and Michael Shermer come to mind.  From Ron Numbers’ own testimony, though, it seems he and his friend sincerely wanted to keep their faith.  They respected truth and yet were conflicted by what appeared to be solid evidence against what they had been taught.  A solid education in handling difficulties and controversies honestly and critically is good insurance against sudden challenges by conflicting ideas.It goes without saying that bad beliefs deserve to fall when unable to withstand a challenge.  Some Christians fall for foolish ideas that are not supportable from the Bible or scientific evidence, like myths of NASA support for Joshua’s long day, or speculations about where heaven is in the visible universe.  Critical thinking demands the honesty to abandon a belief that is no longer defensible after rigorous investigation of the evidence and research into all the well-reasoned points of view.  The same standard cuts both ways.  When will the evolutionists abandon Haeckel’s; embryos, junk DNA, vestigial organs and the other discredited props for their beliefs?    Unfortunately for Ron, his doubts about a young earth were aggravated by legitimate doubts about the credibility of SDA’s prophetess Ellen White – a writer no other Christian groups consider authoritative.  This contributed to him tossing the whole religious package altogether.  Most SDAs are very congenial and sincere people, but any Christian who gets too closely tied to one particular sect or denomination should take warning.  Beware if you belong to any group that becomes ingrown and isolated, trusts only its own material and shuns fellowship with other true Christians in other denominations.  Sectarianism can pose a setup for rejection of all Christianity by the young when maybe the fault is with unusual teachings or practices of the denomination, not the Bible itself.  The more a church, tradition, or a strong leader becomes the authority rather than the Bible itself, the greater the risk.Science is a search for truth, but it is not the truth.  It is limited in its domain (the observable world).  It is done by fallible humans.  Science is tentative at best, and often wrong.  There are deep and abiding philosophical doubts about the ability of mere mortals to comprehend reality by our senses with any confidence that what we deem scientific today is true, necessary, universal and certain.*  It bears repeating: evidence does not interpret itself.  Over and over in these pages you have read about evolutionists twisting and forcing contradictory evidence into the rigid container of their world view.  The same evidence can often bear one or more other equally-valid interpretations.  At best, science can claim evidence is consistent with a belief but cannot thereby claim it is True with a capital T.  Even the claim of consistency is a judgment call.  It often involves willfully ignoring some inconsistent evidence rivals might consider weighty.    The next time someone shows you supposedly incontrovertible evidence that the Bible cannot be trusted, and that science has proved it wrong, don’t be so quick to believe the claim.  Like the father in the story above, go find out.  The Bible has withstood millennia of attacks from all sides.  Sometimes you may have to wait a few years for the scientific consensus to shift back, or for a volcano to blow the old theory up in smoke.  A world view worth living by is one that is rooted and grounded in conviction that has been tested by challenge.  Victorious faith requires both exercise and armor.  Young people should go to “world view boot camp” for both.  Exercise teaches one how to use the armor, and the sparring of ideas allows quality armor to show its true mettle.(Visited 61 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Conference focused on boosting hops production

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio hops growers experienced strong demand in 2015 for the specialty crop used as a key ingredient in craft beers, and, experts say, the demand isn’t likely to decline soon.Hops is a main ingredient beer manufacturers use to provide bitterness to balance the sweetness of malt sugars in their product.“Ten years ago, you could count all of Ohio’s breweries on your fingers and toes, ears and nose,” said Brad Bergefurd, a horticulturist with the Ohio State University South Centers at Piketon. “However, in 2015, there were more than 150 licensed breweries statewide to feed the demand for locally brewed craft beer.“To meet this growing demand, an estimated 6,000 acres of hops are required by Ohio craft brewers at current use rates. As of 2015, Ohio only had an estimated 200 acres of hops planted.”As more Ohio-based craft brewers seek to procure hops grown locally, interest in growing these crops continues to rise among both established and potential hops growers statewide, Bergefurd said, especially since the income potential for hops growers is significant thanks to industry demand.To help new growers learn how to get started growing both hops and malting barley in Ohio, a two-day Ohio Hops and Malting Barley Conference and Trade Show will be held Feb. 24-25 at Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., in Wooster on the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center campus.The workshop will feature detailed information on the latest in hops and malting barley production, including mechanical harvesting, processing, malting and pelletizing, Bergefurd said.The conference is for both beginning and advanced hops and malting barley growers and anyone interested in growing these crops to meet the increasing demand for a rapidly expanding industry, he said.“According to data from the Brewer’s Association, on average 1.5 new craft breweries are opening each day, representing a return to the localization of beer production,” Bergefurd said. “A majority of Americans live within 10 miles of a local brewery, providing farms with a local market for their farm-raised hops.”The conference will include a two-day trade show.The event will feature horticulture experts with Ohio State University Extension, OARDC and OSU South Centers as well as other agricultural industry professionals. Bergefurd and Mary Gardiner, an Ohio State entomologist, will host the workshop.Workshop topics will include topics such as planning to make your hops farm profitable, how brewers select their hops, managing diseases in the hops yard, identifying and managing hops pests, and weed and herbicide management.Conference participants will be able to meet some of Ohio’s best hops growers and learn how to take advantage of hops mechanical harvesters, processing and pelletizing operations that have been formed and are available for Ohio hops growers, Bergefurd said.Because of a U.S. Department of Agriculture/Ohio Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Block Grant, OSU Extension researchers, including Bergefurd and Gardiner, have developed a hops development program focused on profitable production and marketing.“Over 100 licensed Ohio beer manufacturers and thousands of home brewers send about $30 million in hops purchases and related jobs out of Ohio by buying flowers of the hop plant, called hop cones or hops, from out of state,” Bergefurd said. “Our research is designed to increase Ohio hops production and keep some of that income in Ohio.”Registration for the conference is $175 for both days or $100 for one day. Registration includes a spiral-bound booklet, a flash drive with conference presentations, snacks and beverages. The Feb. 24 banquet is an additional cost of $50 per person. The deadline to register for the conference is Feb. 5.For more information on the conference, contact Bergefurd at 740-289-2071, ext. 136, or Bergefurd.1@osu.edu, or Charissa Gardner at 740-289-2071, ext. 132.To register and to find the conference’s full agenda, go to go.osu.edu/OhioHopsAndBarleyConference. Those interested in being a vendor for the conference trade show can also find information there.last_img read more

National Biodiesel Conference celebrates 25 years of accomplishments

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Producers, marketers and aficionados gathered in Fort Worth, Texas in late January for the 25th National Biodiesel Conference & Expo.Attendees got to learn about the latest policy developments related to biodiesel, see a hot-off-the-line B20 ready diesel Ford F-150 pickup truck, visit a Vehicle Showcase featuring offerings from General Motors, John Deere, Caterpillar and Optimus Technologie, learn about a semi-truck that runs on 100% biodiesel, and enjoy the Biodiesel Ride & Drive that allowed attendees to take a spin in new diesel vehicles around Fort Worth.Though the focus of the conference was on fuel, it has very agricultural roots. Soybean farmers were instrumental in the initial push for biodiesel and the start of the conference 25 years ago.“We need to remember that we have a tremendous product that can produce meal, oil and we are very competitive around the world,” said Dave Dotterer an Ohio Soybean Council board member from Wayne County who attended the conference. “With biodiesel we have a product that reduces carbon in the atmosphere and we can replace fuel without cutting performance. It is renewable — we can grow it every year. We are consistent in our production and there is a stable supply. The people who produce biodiesel do not have to wonder if we will have a supply next year. They can depend on it and they know it is always going to be there.”Roughly half of the biodiesel used in the U.S. is made from soybean oil. The other half is produced from sources like used cooking oil, animal fats, and other fats and oils.Soybeans are grown primarily to produce protein meal for livestock feed. So, the first processing step after soybeans leave the farm is to a soybean crush facility where 80% of every soybean is used to produce livestock feed. The volume of oil that remains after protein extraction exceeds demand for feed or food uses including salad dressing, frying and baking, so a portion of that oil not used for food or export is used to produce biodiesel.“Every soybean is approximately 80% protein meal and 20% oil. You can see slight variation in that but it is a fundamental ratio. That is something the plant has developed. It is storing energy in that seed to grow a new plant,” said Don Scott, director of sustainability for the National Biodiesel Board. “The biodiesel industry began with soybean oil because when we grow protein for food, soy is one of the best sources. It produces more protein per acre than any other crop, but it also produces a lot of oil. When we grow soy for protein we produce more fat than we can possibly eat. We have more oil than we can consume. We needed a product we could make out of this oil and it makes great fuel.”Biodiesel production offers numerous benefits for farmers and consumers.“We can blend it with petroleum, it has great performance on-road and reduces emissions,” Scott said. “It is around a 63-cent increase per bushel for farmers and it is also good for livestock producers because it decreases the price they have to pay for feed.”Much of the conference looked into addressing the myths and real challenges of biodiesel.“When you get in sub-zero temperatures you have to pay attention to the diesel fuel you use. The same is true for petroleum and for biodiesel. You have to have a blend that will perform at low temperatures,” Scott said. “You can achieve that with biodiesel, but just like diesel you have to pay attention to those cloud points and make sure you are using the proper fuel and good quality fuel.”These types of quality biodiesel blends are the focus of Wade Thorson, with Benchmark Biodiesel, Inc. in Columbus.“About 15 years ago I was working for a small bank that got into the ethanol business and I saw an opportunity with biodiesel. I put together a business plan to become a producer and found a site in Columbus that was an old Texaco fuel terminal. I was all set to begin production and crude oil prices started declining, so instead of building a production facility, we started blending biodiesel and diesel off the pipeline that is now the Benchmark Biodiesel Fuel Terminal in Columbus,” Thorson said. “Biodiesel is now more readily available, but the end customer still doesn’t understand that they can get biodiesel from people like us. Unless they seek it out they don’t know about it. Then they hear things like biodiesel will void their warranty, choke the engine up and if anything goes wrong — even a flat tire — it is because of biodiesel. That is just not the case.”Benchmark Biodiesel, along with a sustained industry-wide effort, has been taking extensive measures to improve quality and reliability of the biodiesel blends being offered.“When we renovated our facility we insulated and heated all our tanks. Our diesel comes off a pipeline at 50 or 60 degrees and we keep it heated to 70 degrees so when we blend we are assured that the blend will be terrific, as opposed to splash diesel that may be blended cold and the biodiesel may sit in there for awhile and gel up,” Thorson said. “We blend specifically for our customer right at the fuel rack. We have the most sophisticated blending system in the state. It is fabulous and we have not had problems even with the zero degree weather in Ohio this year. Any time there is any cold weather you want to get the blended biodiesel at the rack.”The fuel and the biodiesel industry as a whole have accomplished much in the last 25 years. Following a University of Missouri study that demonstrated biodiesel had potential as a diesel fuel replacement, the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council created the National SoyDiesel Development Board in 1992. With the opportunity to use the surplus of soybean oil collected each year, while also expanding energy security and environmental benefits, other state soybean associations quickly joined the effort. The new association changed its name to the National Biodiesel Board in 1994 to reflect the diversity of fats and oils that can be made into biodiesel.In the early days, NBB spearheaded diesel engine research and emissions testing to demonstrate biodiesel’s environmental benefits, leading to official specifications for the fuel used in diesel cars and trucks and earning the reputation as America’s first commercially produced advanced biofuel. The producers then were primarily a collection of small businesses serving their communities, distributing a few hundred million gallons of biodiesel by the turn of the century.Today, through implementation of the federal Renewable Fuel Standard and a tax incentive to spur growth, the advanced biofuel has blossomed into a nearly 3 billion gallon per year industry. The biodiesel industry supports more than 64,000 jobs and, to be called biodiesel, the fuel must meet the strict quality specifications of ASTM D6751.“Biodiesel is an American success story,” said Donnell Rehagen, NBB CEO. “We have overcome countless challenges, and we will undoubtedly face many more as we continue to grow the industry. But for everyone who has pulled together for the past 25 years to make our success a reality, this conference is a great time to celebrate.”last_img read more

Pacio unfazed by last-minute opponent change

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first_imgPhoto by Mark Giongco/INQUIRER.netJoshua Pacio is likely on his way to a title shot if he goes on to hurdle his Chinese opponent Min Qiang Lan in the co-main event of ONE: Global Superheroes on Friday.But as much as the Filipino strawweight contender wants to get his hands on the gold, he doesn’t want to get ahead of himself especially with a big bout coming up against a dangerous opponent.ADVERTISEMENT NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Injured Nadal out of Australian Open; Cilic into semifinals LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena stingcenter_img Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH “Of course, I want the belt but for me, right now, I’m not thinking about getting a title shot just yet,” Pacio told INQUIRER.net in Filipino on Tuesday.“I still need to gain more experience for me to get to the level of champions,” he added.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutPacio is supposed to fight Pongsiri Misatit, but the Thai was forced to withdraw due to an injury.ONE announced the opponent change on Friday, giving Pacio’s camp less than two weeks to adjust their game plan. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ONE CEO believes Joshua Pacio won the fight PLAY LIST 00:52ONE CEO believes Joshua Pacio won the fight04:36Joshua Pacio is the new ONE Strawweight world champion00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City MOST READ View comments John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding But Pacio isn’t concerned with the sudden change.“I’m not worried because fighters in the international stage are expected to cope up with the changes and that’s how fighters’ mentality should be,” Pacio said.Pacio said there are similarities between his initial foe and replacement in terms of their strengths which is striking, but added that Lan is the more lethal striker than the two.“We saw a video of one of Lan’s fights and he’s better than Pongsiri in striking so I prepared really hard in training and that’s what I’m going to showcase on Friday.”ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more