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Landscape Services details annual snow removal effort

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first_imgDespite South Bend’s reputation for frigid winters and heavy snowfalls, members of the Notre Dame community need rarely worry about snow or ice on walkways and parking lots during even the coldest months of the year. Each year, Landscape Services partners with the Athletic Grounds Team for the enormous undertaking of Notre Dame’s snow removal operation, which Tim Dyczko, assistant superintendent of landscape services, described in an email as “the best in the business.”“We use a combination of 1/2 ton trucks all the way up to two 1/2 ton dump trucks to clear 21 lane miles of roads and 93 acres of parking lots,” Dyczko said in the email. “Our walks total over 41 miles across campus, which are cleared using large mechanical brooms as well as snow blades when the snow becomes too deep for broom operation. We also take care of [over] 40 sets of stairs/steps as well as cut throughs from the parking lots and all the bus stops across campus.”A “lane mile” is a technical term meaning one mile long by 12 feet wide.Landscape Services prepares for the first snowfall months in advance, Dyczko said. When a snowstorm or heavy snowfall is anticipated, they will lay down liquid anti-icer in advance to prevent snow from sticking to walkways. In addition to physical removal of snow, granular salt is applied to sidewalks to melt accumulated snow and ice.“We have had other institutions inquire about how we are able to keep our walks in such good condition during the winter with little to no damage to the grass come springtime,” he said. “The machines we use for the walks are custom-built to remove snow and place granular product and anti-icing liquid all in one pass. It is a complex yet very well-organized operation of highly skilled operators who know their areas of responsibility extremely well every time it snows.”Dyczko said the crews maintain 22 hours of coverage every day from Dec. 1 to April 1.“When we are faced with a snow event, our crews come in at 2 a.m. with the goal of having campus clear and safe for our campus community by 7 a.m. unless conditions dictate otherwise,” he said. “Often times during big snow events, our crews will work 12-hour shifts for several days until the event is over.”Dyczko said that removing snow and ice is crucial for University function during the winter months.“It is a safety issue most of all,” he said. “If it is not safe to drive and walk on campus, then the entire operation of the University is at risk.”Dyczko praised the Landscape Services employees for their hard work year-round ensuring that the campus remains clean and safe.“The staff that is charged with snow removal is the same team that does such a great job in maintaining the campus in spring, summer and fall,” he said. “They are highly dedicated employees who work very hard to ensure that campus operations, including classes and research, are not interrupted by even the worst of winter weather.”Tags: Anti-icing, Athletic Grounds Team, De-icing, Landscape Services, Snow Removallast_img read more

Are you communicating enough with your appraisers? (Part 1)

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first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Effective October 3rd, property appraisals will generally be subject to a zero tolerance threshold under the Integrated Disclosure Rule (“TRID”). TRID provides that fees paid for a third-party settlement service for which the member is not permitted to shop fall into the zero tolerance category. What this means for your credit union is that the appraisal fee you disclose on the Loan Estimate must be exactly what the member is required to pay at closing, absent the occurrence of a valid changed circumstance. In this two-part blog series we’ll identify the challenges associated with this requirement and the steps your credit union can take to be compliant.What Is All The Fuss About?Currently under the RESPA rules governing the Good Faith Estimate (“GFE”), the appraisal fee falls within the 10% tolerance category. This means that the member may be asked to pay more for the appraisal if for some reason the cost of the report increases between application and closing. This has led many cooperatives to take the approach of disclosing a “ballpark” appraisal fee on the GFE. Obviously after October 3rd this approach will no longer work. Remember the old idiom – close only counts in horseshoes (and hand grenades).So what happens if upon further inspection of the property some of its features have your appraiser calling and asking for more money to complete the report? Is the answer to just inflate the cost of every appraisal on the Loan Estimate? Because the rule only provides that the member cannot pay MORE at closing, right? Not so fast. Regulation Z provides that a credit union must disclose an estimate of settlement charges on the Loan Estimate in good faith and consistent with the best information reasonably available at the time of the disclosure. So now what? continue reading »last_img read more

… Chukwuemeka Apologises to ABS Fans over Relegation Â

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first_imgThe Director of Football (DOF), Abubakar Bukola Saraki (ABS) Ilorin FC, Alloy Chukwuemeka, has said relegation was not part of what the club bargained for at the start of the just concluded 2016/2017 Nigeria Professional Football League (NPFL).He said this after the Saraki Boys lost 2-1 to Nasarawa United in Lafia on Saturday in the final game of the season.The Nigeria Premier League Club Owners’ Scribe, said he was very disappointed with the outcome of the season but has learnt some great lessons from the bad season.He added that although the club started the season on a brighter note but was later affected by what he described as ‘ the usual Nigeria football environmental factors’. Chukwuemeka however expressed hope that with the solid football management structure in his club, the Ilorin side would make a quick return to the Premier League next season. “With our sustainable football management structure I can assure you that we will bounce back to the NPFL soonest because that is where we belong ““The objective of our proprietor, Dr. Bukola Saraki, for the club was to give young boys lifeline through football.“We have been able to achieve this, we had three of our victorious NPFL/La Liga U-15 Promises boys playing in the main team now.“Few of the other young players we discovered may also move on to bigger clubs too. “The beauty of it is that we have plenty talents in Kwara and Nigeria in general and we will discover more when we start the season,” Chukwuemeka said.Chukwuemeka apologised to the fans for the embarrassment brought them with the relegation but assured them the team will bounce back sooner than expected.The Saraki Boys still has the AITEO Cup to compete for as they tackle Unicem Rovers in the round of 16 of the competition on Wednesday in Calabar.   Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Page 1 2A select group of HBCU students underwent

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first_imgPage: 1 2A select group of HBCU students underwent an immersive experience at Apple’s Cupertino, California, headquarters this week.The Immersion Experience program is the result of a partnership between Apple and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund to prepares these students for upcoming internships with Apple.“We’ve had a wonderful opportunity so far, and we got to speak with executives and get a tour of the campus. We also met with Ambassador Andrew Young yesterday–it’s been a really great time,” said Haley Hall, a junior at Howard University, and marketing major.[Related: Apple to Donate More than $40 Million to Thurgood Marshall College Fund]Garston Seneza, a junior at Philander Smith College and a computer science and mathematics major also said the students were given a tour around the Apple campus and also met with mentors.Denise Young-Smith, vice president for worldwide human resources, Apple, spoke with Black Enterprise on the significance of the program.“Historically black colleges and universities are a treasure and a treasure talent pool that for whatever reasons; proximity, culture…has been somewhat less than minimally tapped by the tech industry,” said Young-Smith.“Being an HBCU graduate myself, I understand this depth of talent that many companies, unfortunately, don’t get to see…given that most HBCUs are geographically located in the southeastern [part of the U.S.],” she said.Young-Smith was familiar with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund saying the organization has “a good reputation” and “solid board leadership.” With TMCF, Apple wanted to understand why great students coming from the several HBCU engineering schools, such as Tuskegee and Howard, were not getting exposure and access to Silicon Valley.“We decided to embark on a long-term partnership,” says Young-Smith.” We agreed to an apprenticeship that encompassed many facets that would not help just Apple, but helps the students and some of the really focused faculty members that we met, and helps the tech industry as a whole.”M. Scott Lilly, vice president of programs and president of the Opportunity Finance Corporation (OFC), at the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, also spoke about this collaborative effort.“I look at this program as a startup; it’s inaugural not just for Apple but for us,” says Lilly. He says the partnership was ideal because “we pride ourselves in being nimble and quick” in alignment with “the culture of Apple.”The decision was made to widen the pool of potential interns to include other majors besides computer science. The idea is to show as many students as possible that dreams of working for a company such as Apple are achievable.(Continued on next page)Page: 1 2 be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/an-immersive-experience-for-hbcu-scholars-at-apple/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/an-immersive-experience-for-hbcu-scholars-at-apple/last_img read more