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Questions about the Level 4 Value Creation Approach to Sales

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first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 46:18 — 37.2MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSAnthony:  All right. So here we are, in the arena, different kind of in the arena, now not interviewing a guest but being interviewed by Beth, who’s going to ask me some questions that we get frequently about Eat Their Lunch and Level Four Value Creation and my general approach to sales, which is different and does cause people to question what I’m saying and what we think they should be doing. So, let’s go ahead and get started talking about some of the questions and how we can help people think about this so that they can sell in a what I would call, the 21st century way of selling. It’s a new time and the evolution of sales means that things just keep getting trickier, so you got to keep pace here.Beth:  Yeah, it’s really true. We get a lot of questions. The one I think you get a lot is about your approach you recommended at Eat Their Lunch. We talk a lot about the creating value and the four levels, so maybe the best place to start just everyone has context is what are the four levels of value and really why should people even care about this idea?Win customers away from your competition. Check out Eat Their LunchAnthony: Well, they should care because I wrote it in a book but, no, the thing about the four levels that was interesting to me as I was trying to find some way to explain to people how you approach sales tends to fall into one of four categories. And some people who over index on results, they just produce better results, they tend to start from one side of the conversation and somebody else starts from the other side. So the four levels generally fall into categories like this. Level one means, I’m an account on my company’s history and my product. That’s what’s going to do the selling for me. I’m not the value proposition, I’m not the value creator, you’ve got to trust that my good company that’s been around for all these years is what’s going to create value for you and our products and services are going to create value for you and look at this proof.Anthony: I can even show you logos and big companies just like yours. And level one ultimately means you’re going to be perceived as a commodity because of it’s just the product and there’s nothing more to it. Then I’m going to look for price because there’s nothing else to look at and evaluate. Level two means you have a good experience, which means great support, great service. You sold me your product and you also gave me a whole bunch of problems when I have that and I need somebody to help me with that, and I may even have a contract to have certain support, and it’s a level up from level one. So you’re at level two, but level two includes level one. So you can’t be like, “We’re really good at support but our product’s still terrible and it won’t work for you.” You need both of those together to get to level two.Anthony: Level three is where we’ve been commoditized for, I’m going to say probably 30 years. So I can create a tangible result for you and my competitors can. And I have an ROI calculator and you have an ROI calculator and we both can turn it into a spreadsheet. And what I would call level three now is reactives. You tell me you have a problem, I’ll solve it for you. That’s different. It’s not like level four at all because you’re assuming that I can go in and say, “What’s keeping you up at night?” And get your dissatisfaction and solve that for you. But everybody does that. So now that level of value, even though it’s the third highest level of value that we can see right now, is still commoditized. So it’s still not enough for you to be differentiated. Not Easily anyway.Anthony: Level four is strategic and it means that you’re going to enter into a conversation about what’s the strategic outcome. And I love this quote from Theodore Levitt from Harvard Business School. He was a marketing professor there and he said, “People don’t buy drills, they buy holes. And if we could have the hole without having to buy your drill, they’d be happy not to buy the drill. They’d be happy not to know that it’s yellow. They’d be happy not to have to buy drill bits and all these other things. They just want the hole.”Anthony: And I think for most of us when we come in, we’re in enamored with our product or our service and we want to talk about those things because we’re hyped up about it and we know that we can make a difference for people. But level four is actually the place right now where you can find the differentiation as a salesperson and you don’t have to rely on all of the earlier levels of value. even though you’re going to get to them at some point. So those are the four levels of value and what we know and what we can see is that when people come in and they’re super strategic, they’re leading with insight, they’ve got advice, they’re consultative, they tend to produce better results than people that come in at level one and identify themselves as a commodity.Beth: Well, and it’s interesting because you teased my next question here a bit, which is when you lay out the four levels, that makes complete sense. But people are really concerned about this approach and I’m curious as to what you see, why they’re concerned and what that all means.Anthony:  Well, their concerns come from a couple things. So when you start talking about having business acumen and understanding what I call the super trends, and the reason I call them super trends and not just trends is because you’re looking for things that are going to impact your client’s business, that are broad enough to have significant implications for them. So if you think about a couple of examples, so think about the taxi industry when Uber launches. And they’re not concerned, they don’t think anything of it because the taxi industry has worked that way for a long time, but the trend there is, there are unused resources that haven’t been organized. There’s black cars all over the place in major cities that don’t have enough work, and with an app where somebody can go on and organize those black cars and get them to the people that they need them, is an existential threat to the taxi industry.Anthony:  And in New York it is right now. It’s very hard to sell a medallion in New York city because they’re not worth very much anymore, and that’s the kind of thing. So what is the trend? When the smartphone came out, it didn’t look like an existential threat to anybody, but it ends up being an existential threat to a whole bunch of people. And these trends that we look for, we’re looking for things that are going to cause your clients or your perspective clients to have to change something in the next, let’s call it 18 to 24 months. So people are concerned, well what about these trends? Doesn’t my customer already know what all these trends are? Aren’t they already aware of all these things? Aren’t they already doing something about them? So they’re concerned about that.Anthony: They’re also concerned about the idea of just being consultative. And they don’t frame it that way when they say it to me, but they’re concerned about being consultative and they say things like, “Well, you would have to be a Bain consultant or from McKinsey or something to be able to talk about these trends.” And the truth of the matter is you wouldn’t. You’d have to have access to a computer and Google to go out and find the trends and read about them, and then decide which ones make sense in your client’s world. Which ones are going to have the biggest impact on their business over let’s just say 24 months? And then what can you do to help them? So you’re not concerned just about super trends, the things that are big like, in Eat Their Lunch, I talked about 11,000 baby boomers retiring every day. And people are stunned by that number, but that’s what the number is.Anthony: So 4.3 million people retire every day because they’ve decided to leave the workforce in their late 60s or 70s, which means you need 358,000 new jobs just to be able to backfill the baby boomers. And we’re creating 220,000 jobs a month, so there’s still a giant gap being opened up. But if somebody cares about talent, then that’s a trend that might be impactful for them. Their concern is really are we overstepping our boundaries? Are we out of our depth? Do we have the right to come in and share these ideas? And the answer is yes. Even though I know it’s scary for people if they haven’t been taught or trained or explained how to do these things.Beth: Yeah. And I think too what you bring up is very interesting in the fact that there are things like trends you can find from Google when you can do your research, but we’re also filled with incredible insights that our clients would really find valuable that we don’t even recognize. We’re going to address that in a little bit. Another thing that I think is really helpful for people to understand when it comes to this framework, you talk a lot about entering from the right instead of the left. You want to help explain what you mean by that?Anthony: I thought you were going to stop with just you talk a lot.Beth: Well, sometimes.Anthony:  That would have been a true statement too. Yeah, so the thing about where you are and where you start, if you start, “Well, let me introduce myself and my company and let me try to provide proof that I belong in this conversation that’s outside of what I bring to the conversation,” then that we call starting from the left. You’re starting at level one and you want to be strategic and you want to be a trusted advisor, but you’ve already identified yourself as something less than that. And once you start opening up a conversation about things that aren’t really interesting to your client, then that’s who you are to them and you get a limited amount of time.Anthony: I’ve written about this on the blog. The gift of time from your client is a magnificent gift that you should absolutely appreciate enough to do your homework and to come in with something relevant to say. And what we call that approach is we call it coming in from the right, which means you’re coming in from level four and you’re working backwards to three, two, one, instead of starting at one and trying to get to four. So you come in and you start talking about these are the things that we’re observing happening in the market right now. These are the things that we think are going to be implications for companies and people that don’t change. These are our recommendations based on our views and values as to where this market’s going, and we’re right on the intersection, but we’re right on the line between what we do and our client’s business.Anthony: So we’re right they’re saying, “These are our recommendations.” And if you’re thoughtful about this and you just reflect, you tend to know what your clients need to do before they need to do it. And that’s where you become a trusted advisor. So there’s no reason in my mind to hold that till later in the conversation. You start with what’s most important than what’s most relevant, because you’re supposed to be consultative, you’re supposed to be coming in and advising, you’re supposed to be giving your client the best recommendation to get the result that they want, and if you’re not doing that, then I would argue that you’re irrelevant. You’re not useful to me because the conversation that we’re having isn’t about what I really want and what I need to get done.Beth: Yeah, and it’s interesting because when you lay this framework out, and you’re talking with a client and it’s very easy to say like, “Okay, here’s my level one. It’s my product and two is my experience, and three is return on investment, and four is that creating… being insight driven, creating value.” I always have that aha moment when I’m chatting with someone where they go, “Wow, we’re really just playing at level one or two” and then the wheels start turning. It’s, “How do I get to level four?” So, as you look at the framework that you laid out in Eat Their Lunch, how do you take this idea and then make it very practical and tactical? What does that look like?Anthony: You know what? That wasn’t an easy thing to do. It was harder than I thought when I started writing the book, and what I’ve found is that you have to break things into their component parts to make them digestible. So if you’re going to approach selling this way, you start with the super trends and you just look to say, “What’s going on in the world?” And once you capture the trends, you’ve got some idea about what that impact is going to be for your clients. So you start looking at what are the facts? What are the things that I can see that prove that this is true and that it’s going to have an impact? And I think that most people don’t do the work to look at that and say, “Okay, so I’ve got this trend, I’ve got facts, I’ve got proof that it’s going to impact their business. And then what’s the implication?” What’s the implication?Anthony: If there’s no implication, I heard a sales person say to me, “One of the interesting trends in my world right now is that all these billionaires like Musk and Bezos and Branson are now trying to go to outer space.” Okay, great, but what impact does that have on your client? And this particular person said, “Listen, my client advertises in the biggest places they can and they would love to have their logo on the side of a Musk or a Branson spaceship.” And I said, “If you can tie that implication like who gets to go first there, then maybe it makes sense. But what you’re looking for is something that’s going to give them either an opportunity or it’s going to cause them some sort of problem or some sort of challenge. You’re looking for things that are going to compel people to take action.”Anthony: And then you have to think about a couple other things. What are your views and your values? What do you believe is good and right and true? Where do you think their market’s going or your intersection between your market and their business? And then what is your recommendation based on what you believe to be good and right and true? And I think that’s part of what concerns people when they see a framework like this is, “Wait, we have to have an opinion about this?” Yeah, you have to have an opinion because you’re the one that’s coming in to give your best counsel to your client. It’s not enough for them to tell you what they want because you’re supposed to be the expert in what you do, and you’re supposed to be serving them by creating value and teaching them how to think about it.Anthony:  If you’re waiting for your client to say something to you about this is what we think we want, that’s a level three approach and just about anybody could take that call, and my guess is if that’s your strategy, you’re going to be subject to a lot of RFPs. We already defined our problem, we’ve already decided what we want, you just fill this out and say yes to everything that’s in the RFP, and if we find that your price is the lowest, we’ll probably hire you. Not a great strategy.Beth:   No, it’s not. And I… as you were talking there, what I started thinking about was, it’s like when you go buy a house. When you buy a house, you’re very much looking at the aesthetics and whether it is your real estate agent or it is the person who comes in you expect. What you really need to be focused on are the big items. The roof, the furnace, the air conditioner, because your aesthetics are what… that’s an emotional buy. We don’t really want to care about the real meat of the house, and that’s really what you’re talking about. Talking about these sales reps and leaders, having those insights that can prevent them from not being able to create the future that they want. Correct?Anthony: Right. That’s right. Yeah. You’re absolutely trying to help them create the future that they want or maybe one that they can’t even see yet until you show up and you start explaining to them where the market is and what’s going on and how they should be responding.Beth:  Yeah. Well, and it’s interesting because we’re kind of on the same path here as we’re talking about, you have this belief about concerns being real to the prospect who has them. You also have this idea that sales reps often fear the wrong danger. So, I’m curious to what you would say about what fears do prospects concerns reveal, and then what do you think sales rep should be afraid of?Anthony: It’s interesting because I think if you just even start with the very first interaction from a sales person, let’s say they’re making a cold call. And they call and say something like, “I’d love to stop by introduce myself, tell you about my company and learn a little bit about you. Which works better? Wednesday at 11:00 or Thursday at 2:00?” So we give them the alternative of choice, close from 1974 or something like that. I don’t even know how old that is. It’s pretty old. And the fear for the client is you’re going to waste my time. So the concern is you’re going to waste my time. So that’s what prospects are afraid of, but they don’t say it that way. They say something like, “Could you mail me some information?” Or they say something like, “We’re really busy right now. We’re not interested in changing.” Anything to get out of that call specifically because they didn’t hear any trade of value.Anthony: So their concerns tend to be around that at the early stages, and then later on it’s very scary to change. So the devil I know, I can’t get the result I want right now, but I’ve figured out all the work around, skied my business running, and now you’re coming in and telling me I have to do something different. Well, now I have to step into the unknown. So now I’m concerned, is my team going to go along with me? Are we actually going to be able to execute? Are you the kind of sales person that signs a contract with disappearing ink? And a disappearing ink means, as soon as I sign the contract, you disappear and I never see you again when things get rough, because you don’t want to be accountable for the result. So those tend to be their concerns.Anthony: The concerns for salespeople tend to fall into the wrong category. So when you show them a framework like Eat Their Lunch, their concern is, I’m afraid I might overstep my boundary. But their real fear should be, I’m irrelevant and I’m not interesting and I’m not bringing enough value to this person for them to be able to move forward with me. That’s really what their real fear should be. It shouldn’t be that I am overstepping a boundary and it should be that I’m not a value creator. And look, there’s a lot of salespeople, there’s a lot of people who are really good at this.Anthony: There are people who have been practicing sales this way for decades, and we know it’s what works and we know it’s what allows you to differentiate yourself. So if you’re going to fear something, fear not working hard enough to create value, not doing enough to really be a subject matter expert or what I call a 52% SME. So you’re more than half of a subject matter expert and you can talk to any stakeholder, whether it’s the CEO, CMO, or the person that actually uses your product with no fear that you’re going to be outflanked in any conversation with anybody because you’re a subject matter expert. That’s the real fear.Beth:  Well, and I think too, when you were talking a bit about, you’re talking to different levels, why don’t you also talk about how you need to address these different levels in terms of each level stakeholder has a different fear and there’s a different way to address them. It’s not like you can just identify the singular problem and say, “Okay, I’m going to give this answer across every stakeholder because it’s very different.” Why don’t you talk a little bit about how you look at those stakeholders and deal with this fear issue?Anthony: Yeah, that’s a good question. One of the things that confuses people about the four levels of value is they’re like, “I’m just going to play at level four.” Okay, good, I support you there. But you have to remember, when you go to the end user, let’s say you sell a SAS product and you’re talking to the end user who’s actually going to use your product from day to day, and you start by saying, “Let’s get into a really strategic conversation about where your company’s going to go in the next 24 months.” That person is like, “I just need the software to work.” Can you help me get the result that I need from your software?”Anthony:  They’re not concerned about the strategic vision of the company. They’re concerned about, can I execute with your product? When you get up to level two, let’s say you are a SAS company, then you start to get in ancillary stakeholders who say, “Look, you have to be easy to do business with. I need single sign on,” or something like that. “I need you to integrate with my CRM. I need you to make this easy for me.” And so level two starts to matter very much to that group. Level two tends to matter to management as well. Like, “I need you to be easy to do business with so we can work together.”Anthony: Level three tends to be for managers and leaders. Is this going to work? Is it going to be functional? Are we going to be able to execute this once you install it? And then level four tends to belong to management and leadership, which is where we going, and then how do you help us get there? So in a post I wrote, I was talking about a conversation that I had with someone who was talking about data.com and their competitors, and I started talking about the different ways that you might talk about that.Anthony: So you might say, “I have the biggest database with phone numbers and emails at the lowest price, then you’re one.” But you might also just as easily with the same products say something like, “I can help you acquire clients with the highest lifetime value faster than you’re acquiring them now.” And that’s a strategic outcome. So, who cares about the database? A lot of people have phone numbers and emails. A lot of people are easy to do business with. A lot of people can integrate with your CRM, but not many are going to show up and say, “I can help you find the highest lifetime value customers and acquire them faster than you are now.” Okay, that’s strategic.Anthony:          And that to me sounds like what I want to buy if I’m a leader. I’m not trying to buy data, I’m trying to buy faster results. So when you start talking in the language of faster results, you now look really interesting to me. You’re much different salesperson than the one that comes in and starts talking about the size of their database and the phone numbers and their emails, because we’re not trying to buy phone numbers. We’re back to, they don’t want a drill, they want a hole. So what’s the hole? The hole is acquisition of the right customers faster.Beth: Yeah. And before we leave this topic, let’s talk about one other thing here, and it goes back to the stakeholders and the things that people are afraid of. We always put things in context of current state and future state. You want to talk a little bit about that and what that means to those various stakeholders?Anthony:  Yeah. The current state, future state thing is a really important concept for people to understand, and I don’t see too many sales people or sales organizations that actually frame things that way. And the first thing about current state is, where are you now and what’s possible for you that you don’t tap? So how do we look at where you are and say, “Wait a second. This current state is untenable.” And the challenge that people have with that is unless you can put the context into that conversation. So you’re talking about the trends, you’re talking about the implications you’re talking about why they need to change and how they need to change, unless you can identify that current state in a way that says, “Look, it’s at risk, it’s untenable, you need to start changing,” then there’s not a reason for people to do anything different than what they’ve been doing up until that point.Anthony: And I think one of the challenges when people look at this framework and they say something like, “Wow, do they really care about the trends?” Well, some of them and others they don’t. But do they care about the implications of missing something and ending up not producing the results they want? Yeah, they do. And especially at the leadership level, they definitely care about that. In fact, senior leaders, the thing that they’re most afraid of is not knowing something that was available to them if they would have had a conversation about that before it happened. That’s what they’re most fearful of. I didn’t know and I didn’t act fast enough. This is why throughout all of history, there have always been trusted advisors. So if you read the Bible, if you read history books, you’re going to find out there were a bunch of kings and pharaohs that surrounded themselves with people who knew things they didn’t know, so they didn’t end up causing themselves more problems by not taking action soon enough. So that’s part of it.Anthony: And then the future state really matters. Like where do you need to go? Where do you need to go to take advantage of what’s going on right now, or to at least avoid the challenges that might harm your business? So if you’re not helping a client go from that current state to the future state, what is it that you’re working on? There’s nothing else for you to work on. That’s really where the action is, and that’s really where the conversation is.Beth:  Well, and you bring up something else, which is there’s this power of information. And for a very long time, I would say in the last 20 years, it’s really been picking up speed is that there’s information everywhere. I just Google and I find what I need to know, and I always say that there is this danger of your prospect. They only know as much as either they have read or someone has told them, which is pieces and parts. So there’s a big disparity between the buyer and seller. And talk a little bit about why that is true and not true and how we deal with that as sales reps.Anthony: Yeah. If you go to WebMD and you type in all your symptoms, you’re going to come back and find out that… in my case, I have ovarian cancer. And I go to my doctor with my own diagnosis and she says to me, “I don’t think that that’s true, but I’m happy to run some tests just to see.” And you can go and find information, but information is not the same as insight, and information is not the same as wisdom. And it’s not the same as what we call situational knowledge, which means the experience that tells you that this is good and right and true and this probably isn’t. Or this is better in this circumstance and this probably isn’t. But there’s still information disparity. And right now, if you go to LinkedIn and you read the prognosticators and pseudo experts as Mike Weinberg would call them, you’re going to find a whole bunch of people that say all the power has shifted to the buyer.Anthony: They know everything that you know, because they can read your website. Well, on my website, you probably do can’t find out everything I know because there’s 4,085 posts there. So there’s a lot of what I believe and know in that particular place, but it would take you something like 240 hours to read all those posts, and you may not want to go to the trouble to do that. For most people on their sites for their business, there’s content there, there’s certainly information there, but there’s not necessarily wisdom there, and there’s not necessarily the insights, and the trade-offs, and the situational knowledge that a salesperson has. And this is one of the fears that causes people to have a, I guess, some hesitancy in about approach like this. And here’s why they think, “Well, my client knows more than me.” And they can go out to the Internet and read all about companies like ours and they can start to decide what they want, without me having to be there.Anthony: And you’re wrong. So the truth of the matter is, your client knows more about their business then you do. And they should. They work in that business. They make decisions for that business. They may know more about their vertical than you do. They may have worked in that industry for a very long time, they might have incredible situational knowledge, but at the intersection where your business serves their business, you should know more than they know. And why is that? Because let’s take for example, somebody who buys like enterprise resource planning software. They buy that. They want to buy that one time in their life and never buy it again, because it’s like a quadruple bypass, a brain surgery, a colonoscopy and a root canal at the same time. You do not want to rip the whole guts of your business out and then have to replace that, so you don’t want to make mistakes at this.Anthony: If you bought it twice in your lives, you would still be unhappy buying it the second time. It’s just not something that you buy very frequently. And I’m using this to make an example. If I sell ERP, if that’s what I do for a living, I’ve done it hundreds of times. My company has done it thousands of times. We have a depth of experience and situational knowledge that says, “This is a better choice for you than that.” Well, how do you know that? Because we tried it 56 times this way in the past and we can’t make it work in your vertical. This is the best way we have to make it work for you and here’s what all our experience tells us is the right answer.Anthony: So they’re buying that experience that you have, that situational knowledge that it’s impossible for them to have unless they’ve actually done that role and worked in that business. So they have maybe the same experience that you have, but it’s highly unlikely. Most of the time they buy what you sell infrequently. And because it’s infrequent, they can’t possibly have the situational knowledge. So you’re leaning, not just on trends, but you’re leaning on views and values and your experience, and your ability to help them make trade-offs and make good decisions about what they’re going to do.Beth: Well, and this is what complicates purchases. Decision making. It’s where things get paralyzed. This is a great example of where an RFP goes wrong. I actually was talking with someone last week and she had told me a story about how a year ago she had gone and bought some software, thought it was the right one, come to find out the information she bought it on wasn’t quite correct, and so she’s very quietly, because the contractor is up as replacing it with something new, and she’s crossing her fingers with better insight now. So the whole idea that having that insight that you have, that you’ve learned, that your company has learned, to be able to share with your prospects is really invaluable for them because they generally don’t know it.Anthony: Yeah, that’s the truth. They generally don’t know and they’re trying to make a good decision, but when they go out on their own and they don’t get the help that they need, and they don’t have somebody really walk them through that, you end up with situations like this where they are buyer’s remorse, because they really weren’t helped by a competent salesperson that could give them the right advice as to what to buy or not to buy.Beth: Well, and the other part of it is you and I have been in this a really long time and sales is just constantly evolving. And it has changed dramatically even from 2008, which was really the catalyst from moving from transactional to having to be a lot more strategic. You write and speak about this a lot and I’m curious as to what is it really mean? And more importantly, what are the implications for sales people, sales leaders, and really we look at the whole sales organization to be able to keep up with the evolving change of sales?Anthony: Yeah, it’s a good question. My view is, on that, there’s really just two strategies that are emerging or have emerged. And one I call super transactional, which is amazon.com. You can not out transact amazon.com, or Alibaba, or one of those kinds of places where they’ve taken all the friction out of buying so much so that my kindle says I have 1400 books on there because Amazon’s algorithm is so good and there’s no friction. So they pop something up in front of me and say, “Anthony, we think you would like this book because you like these other books.” And I say, “Well, you’re right. I would like that book.” And I buy it. There’s no friction. I don’t have to go to a bookstore, and more and more things are getting dragged into that gravitational pull of how do we become super transactional? And I think when you look at Silicon Valley, everybody there, their ethos is, “Let’s just print money. We’re going to transact everything. We’re going to make everything so frictionless that you can just say yes.”Anthony: And it’s working in a lot of cases. So if you think about amazon.com that’s a good one. My children don’t really have pizza delivered, but they use DoorDash and Uber Eats and Grubhub, and they have all kinds of things delivered because there’s resources available. Somebody organized the resources to go pick things up and now everybody delivers food now. So it doesn’t matter. You don’t have to be a pizza place to deliver. Everybody delivers because you’ve got these resources being used that way. The second approach though, I would call super relational as opposed to super transactional. And this means, it’s a complex decision. You need somebody who understands how to help you make that decision. You don’t make it frequently enough and it’s significant for you.Anthony: And where that gravitational pull is dragging people is towards greater advice, greater insight, greater understanding about how to make the right recommendations and help somebody get the result that they want. And I think for a lot of people they saw, my friends, Matt Dixon and Brent Adamson published something that said, “Relationship selling is dead when the challenger sale came out.” And basically, they were using relationship in a particular way. And that was essentially, if all you think that you have is a friendship where I like you and you like me, you’re wrong. And they’re exactly correct about that.Anthony:  The way I would describe it though, super relational means, your relation is not only do I like you? Do I know you? Do I trust you? All those things don’t matter because you’re trying to create a preference to work with you, but the truth of the matter is you also have to create business value for me. And if you don’t create business value for me, then we can be really good friends, but I’ve got to find somebody else who can help me with my business because you’re not offering to do that for me because you don’t have the business acumen, the situational knowledge, and you’re not showing up with advice. You’re not showing up as a consultative salesperson.Beth: I think there’s one other thing that we could talk a little bit about here that lines up with this and that is we have moved to a whole process of decision by committee. It’s not how I initially started, it was very easy to get a couple of people and get them together and now it’s really, really decision by committee, but more importantly, what I think a lot of sales people don’t really recognize is that, let’s just say there’s 10 stakeholders, all 10 can kill that deal. But only one or two of them can actually say yes to it. So how do you address that with the evolution of the sales?Anthony:  You have to have a framework. And then Eat Their Lunch in chapter seven and eight, there’s a framework that’s outlined is how do you look at them, and then what are some of the decisions that you make? What do you do with an opponent? And an opponent would be somebody who you would describe as having very high engagement, and absolutely wants to do anything but work with you. So a preference to work with anybody or anybody who’s not you, and opponents are tricky. So do you bring them in early on? And my answer would be, if you have an executive leader who’s willing to say, “Listen, we’re going to let you speak your piece, but we’re still moving forward this idea,” then maybe you bring them in. Or do you set them to the side and say, “Wait till I build a consensus and then we’ll deal with that individual.”Anthony: There’s not a right answer here because it’s contextual and you have to look at it and decide what to do, but it’s tricky. And if you don’t have the framework for deciding what’s this person’s disposition? How do I look at them? Are they an ally or are they neutral? Are they an obstacle? Are they an opponent? Are they what we call the CEO of the problem? The person who is actually going to be the one that has to say yes and make some recommendation that may even be signed by somebody higher up because you’re right? It’s all about consensus now, but it’s tricky for salespeople. And if you don’t have a framework, chapter seven enable give you one that will allow you to at least look at these things and say, “How do I make sense of it and how do I figure out what I should do in these scenarios?” So it’s a very, very tough challenge for people and from my view, no one’s provided them with any guidance on this up until now.Beth: And that’s really true. We see it a lot. We see the whole challenge in terms of, here’s the right framework, here’s the methodology, here’s the process, people are wanting to do better. So in that context, what do you believe that people should do to improve their approach? If there were some serious solid takeaways, what does that look like?Anthony: Well, there’s a few things. So the first thing I would say is, the one thing that has been talked about least and needed the most, is business acumen. And it’s you have to be a business person now and we’re really good at sales acumen. I can teach you to cold call, I can teach you to overcome objections, I can teach you these things, but it’s hard to make you interested in business. But if you were interested in business, and you’re reading, and you’re listening to CNBC instead of a country radio, or Howard Stern or whatever you listen to, if you would listen and you’d start paying attention and then start reading business books and business magazines and start thinking about the conversations that you’ve heard and what you’ve learned about other businesses and how to make those decisions, and you start capturing that, that’s where all the action has gone.Anthony: There’s a lot of people that can do all kinds of things that we would call sales acumen, but business argument is a differentiator. The second thing that’s a real differentiator, I call situational knowledge. Some people call it situational awareness, some people call it experience, but I call it situational knowledge because what that means to me is that you’ve seen this before and you’ve seen people make different decisions and get different results, and so your knowledge about the context of the situation that the client’s in, starts to be the ground and the foundation of how you give people advice. Why would you tell somebody to do this instead of that?Anthony: Well, because when they do the first thing and not the second thing, the results are terrible. Even though their friends are doing it and it’s wonderful for their friends, but the context is different. So, those two things, if you could just focus on how do I become a better business person? How do I become more consultative? And there’s a lot of confusion about what the word consultative means. It doesn’t mean not high pressure, it doesn’t mean not the hard sell, even though those things are true, it doesn’t mean that you ask really good questions, even though it’s really useful to ask really good questions. It means to counsel people on the decisions that they make in their business. So you consult, you provide advice, and you can’t be a trusted advisor without trust and advice. So you have to work really, really hard on the business acumen piece nowBeth: Why don’t you give someone an example of what business acumen actually sounds like? Because I know that there is a confusion or challenges around what does that exactly sound like? So do you want to just lay out something that would help people understand that this is really what we’re talking about and what’s really required to sell today?Anthony: Yeah, I mean if you were to even just go back to the conversation we were having about level four, saying something like, “Beth, in your industry right now, what we see is that it’s crowded, it’s very difficult to cut through the noise. And if you’re going to acquire the customers with the highest lifetime value faster, one of our strongest recommendations would be that you look at an omni-channel approach, because an omni-channel approach is going to allow us to help you identify those clients and message them with the exact message that’s going to allow you to acquire them faster, and also to acquire the clients that are going to stay with you longest.”Anthony: So if you don’t know that and you can’t have that conversation, then you’re missing a lot of what consultative selling sounds like. And it’s important that you get that. So that’s… it’s just a critical factor. Anybody can say, “My company’s been in business for 72 years and we’ve got this product set and here’s our features and benefits.” That part’s easy to do now. And the evolution of sales that we were talking about, the evolution is that, it’s moving away from super transactional and towards super relational. So you either have these skills or other people that have them are going to be able to eat your lunch.Beth:  Right. And really what you’re highlighting there, and this is the thing that I think most people struggle to get their arms around, is that they have a lot of incredible insights. They have seen customers make bad decisions, they know the mistakes they’re making, they know the areas that they’re not really thinking through or the questions that they should be asking but aren’t, and that’s really where you start coming up with having that strong point of view and having those insights that allow people to make a much better decision. That’s really what you’re after. You’re after the ability to help them make a decision that is really going to create the future they’re looking for.Anthony:  Exactly. And the best strategy right now, is one that’s based on insight in ideas, and not based on, “Let me prove to you that my company’s a good company and that you should trust me because of that.”Beth: Yup, exactly. Well, now I have one more question for you and I’m going to bust your chops a little bit. You always talk about that there are no rules in sales yet. You keep writing all these posts with these rules and we’re talking about rules today, and so I’m curious, you like your rules, but you didn’t really like anybody else’s rules, what are you really getting at?Anthony: You’re out of line. You’re completely out of line. Yeah, I do. I tend to write about rules and there really are no rules. Everything is contextual, and I think one of the challenges for salespeople when they go and they look for advice, is a lot of times you’ll see things like never cold call, or always send two emails before you call. There’s all these rules that in context probably make sense sometimes. I don’t know what times that is, but there are some things that I would say are just such good rules of thumb that you should follow them. Like you have to get business acumen and provide advice and you can’t be consultative if you’re not going to give people really good advice about what they should do. It doesn’t matter what your approach is, even though you’re really a nice person, you’re trusted, if you’re not dispensing the advice, you’re not consultative.Anthony: And I think one of the things that I’m most concerned about is that for a long time you could be a know nothing. You didn’t have to be a business expert, you didn’t have to care about business to be a sales person, but now you do. And all those kinds of things are emerging as sort of the rule sets that we’re playing with right now, and I think that when people look at any of the rules that I’ve written, I’ve written a couple of things. I’ve written the new rules for B2B I know recently, and I wrote the rules for consensus.Anthony: Even though I don’t believe there’s any rules, I do have to say something to get people’s attention to focus on the things that seem to be most important right now, and the only rule that I’m going to share with you right now is, I’m allowed to write rules, posts if I want to, even though I believe that there are no rules and you have to know them all because it just… it works to get people to pay attention and look at things. So a little bit of that, just making sure that people read itBeth:  Well. And I know you well enough to know that a rule today might be a different rule tomorrow because we’re constantly trying to ebb and flow with what the environment dictates. And so I expect more rules from you.Anthony:  You will get them much. Sure.Beth:  Well, that’s all I have for you.Anthony:  All right, well, thank you. That was great.Beth: Very good. Well, we’ll have another one of these coming up, so please pay attention because we will start posting these very regularly.Anthony:  All right, here we go. I’m hitting stop.last_img read more

Who is Yogi Adityanath?

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first_imgThe importance of being Yogi Adityanath  Adityanath runs the Hindu Yuva Vahini in Purvanchal, an outfit that has been often accused of instigating communal tension. This Bajrang Dal-style organisation is particularly effective in the east U.P. districts of Deoria, Kushinagar, Maharajganj, Basti, Sant Kabir Nagar and Siddharthnagar. Here, its activists have been accused of converting minor incidents into communal conflagrations.However during these elections, the Hindu Yuva Vahini broke after some of its members refused to retire some of their candidates. Adityanath expelled some of them.During the recent elections, the BJP leadership for the first time deployed Adityanath extensively in western U.P. after the first phase. Yogi Adityanath, whose real name is Ajay Singh Bisht, is a five-time BJP MP from Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh. He is 44 years old.A Thakur from Uttarakhand by birth, Adityanath earned a graduate degree in Science from Garhwal University in Srinagar. His Lok Sabha profile says he is a “religious missionary and social worker.”Awaidhnath, Mahant of the powerful and wealthy Gorakhnath Temple who had won Gorakhpur thrice consecutively, passed on both his political and religious legacy to Adityanath. Awaidhnath died in 2014.Also Readlast_img read more

LeBron James ‘excited’ to return to Manila for ‘Strive for Greatness’ show

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first_imgRead Next UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief “On my way to Manila! Excited to get back. #StriveForGreatness🚀” said James in a tweet.READ: LeBron James inspires, amazes fans in Manila FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThis is James’ third visit to Manila.In 2013, fans even lined up for days just to get a chance to see him for the “Witness History” event. LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa READ: LeBron James headed back to Manila for Nike RiseTwo years after, he graced the final day of the the Nike Rise program, where under privileged kids got access to professional training for six weeks at the House of Rise.He is schedule to put on a show for his fans at Mall of Asia Arena Saturday afternoon.ADVERTISEMENT LeBron James dazzles Manila anew in his second trip to the country. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLeBron James couldn’t hide his excitement over his return to Manila.The four-time NBA MVP is on his way to the Philippines for the “Strive for Greatness” tour on Saturday.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses View comments WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LeBron James puts on show for ‘unbelievable’ PH fans for 3rd time PLAY LIST 04:50LeBron James puts on show for ‘unbelievable’ PH fans for 3rd time01:22Manila police chief: Cops tolerating illegal street vendors to get ax00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Eze leads Saints in takedown of Heroes in NCAA Season 93 All-Star Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PHlast_img read more

Alaska hires Altamirano, Ildefonso as new coaches

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first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Perasol welcomes solid support from alumni: ‘It gives us pressure to deliver’ “Danny Ildefonso is both one of the best players and best men to ever have played in the PBA. He has always had a tremendous work ethic and has detailed knowledge on how to play the game as a big man. He will surely have a tremendous impact on the development of our big men,” said Compton.Rounding out the new hires for Alaska is Tony dela Cruz, who has now shifted to the coaching after retiring last month.“Tony Dela Cruz has always been one of the smartest players in the PBA and he knows the ins and outs of our system as well as any of our coaches. He is an excellent communicator who has a great relationship with everyone on the team and he will make a very smooth transition into coaching,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netAfter losing key deputies in the offseason, Alaska has enlisted the services of Eric Altamirano, Danny Ildefonso, and Tony dela Cruz to assist coach Alex Compton this upcoming season.“I am really excited about the new coaches we have added to our coaching staff,” said Compton, who lost deputies Louie Alas and Topex Robinson to Phoenix.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMCcenter_img Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Compton will be renewing his partnership with Altamirano, both of whom formed the grassroots program National Basketball Training Center (NBTC).“Coach Eric Altamirano is a proven winner at every single level he has coached at including the PBA. Alaska gets a veteran coach with tremendous experience and character in Coach Eric, truly a man of excellence,” he said of the seasoned mentor, who last called the shots for Flying V Thunder in the PBA D-League.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water polo SPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIldefonso, meanwhile, boasts a decorated career being a two-time PBA MVP with San Miguel, before finishing his career with Meralco.He is currently serving as a big man coach for the NU Bulldogs under coach Jamike Jarin. QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

Here’s Who Nick Saban Thinks Should Be Favored To Win It All (It’s Not Alabama)

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first_imgNick Saban seen talking to the media.ESPN.Alabama is the favorite to win it all this season, according to nearly every sportsbook out there. Nick Saban disagrees with the oddsmakers. Who does the five-time national champion head coach think should be favored to win the national championship? The team his program defeated in last season’s College Football Playoff title game: Clemson. “How can they not pick Clemson?” Saban said during his appearance at ESPN today. “Deshaun Watson is most dominant player in college football since Cam Newton.”Bama 5/1 fav to win nat’l title. Nick Saban: “How can they not pick Clemson? Deshaun Watson is most dominant player in CFB since Cam Newton”— Brett McMurphy (@McMurphyESPN) July 19, 2016Coach Saban starting the morning off in Bristol on @SportsCenter #RollTide pic.twitter.com/taAVky2Ohs— Alabama Football (@AlabamaFTBL) July 19, 2016This is just Saban trying to lessen the expectations for his team, but Clemson’s path to the national championship game is clearer than Alabama’s. The Crimson Tide are probably a more-talented team, but their quarterback situation is unclear and the schedule is pretty brutal. The Tigers, meanwhile, have a Heisman Trophy contender behind center and a more manageable schedule. Who are you betting on to win it all this year?last_img read more

Facebook kills trending topics tests breaking news label

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NEW YORK, N.Y. – Facebook is shutting down its ill-fated “trending” news section after four years, a company executive told The Associated Press.The company claims the tool is outdated and wasn’t popular. But the trending section also proved problematic in ways that would presage Facebook’s later problems with fake news, political balance and the limitations of artificial intelligence in managing the messy human world.When Facebook launched “trending” in 2014 as a list of headlines to the side of the main news feed, it was a straightforward move to steal users from Twitter by giving them a quick look at the most popular news of the moment. It fit nicely into CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s pledge just a year earlier to make Facebook its users’ “personal newspaper.”But that was then. “Fake news” wasn’t yet a popular term, and no foreign country had been accused of trying to influence the U.S. elections through social media, as Russia later would be. Trending news that year included the death of Robin Williams, Ebola and the World Cup.Facebook is now testing new features, including a “breaking news” label that publishers can add to stories to distinguish them from other chatter. Facebook also wants to make local news more prominent.“It’s very good to get rid of ‘trending,’” said Frank Pasquale, a law professor at the University of Maryland and expert on algorithms and society. He said algorithms are good for very narrow, well-defined tasks. By contrast, he said, deciding what news stories should go in “trending” requires broad thinking, quick judgments about context and decisions about whether someone is trying to game the system.In an interview ahead of Friday’s announcement, Facebook’s head of news products, Alex Hardiman, said the company is still committed to breaking and real-time news. But instead of having Facebook’s moderators, human or otherwise, make editorial decisions, there’s been a subtle shift to let news organizations do so.According to the Pew Research Center, 44 per cent of U.S. adults get some or all of their news through Facebook.Troubles with the trending section began to emerge in 2016, when the company was accused of bias against conservatives, based on the words of an anonymous former contractor who said Facebook downplayed conservative issues in that feature and promoted liberal causes. Zuckerberg met with prominent right-wing leaders at the company’s headquarters in an attempt at damage control. Yet two years later, Facebook still hasn’t been able to shake the notion of bias.In late 2016, Facebook fired the human editors who worked on the trending topics and replaced them with software that was supposed to be free of political bias. Instead, the software algorithm began to pick out posts that were getting the most attention, even if the information in them was bogus. In early 2017, Facebook made another attempt to fix the trending section, this time by including only topics covered by several news publishers. The thinking was that coverage by just one outlet could be a sign that the news is fake.The troubles underscore the difficulty of relying on computers, even artificial intelligence, to make sense of the messy human world without committing obvious, sometimes embarrassing and occasionally disastrous errors.Ultimately, Facebook appears to conclude that trying to fix the headaches around trending wasn’t worth the meagre benefit the company, users and news publishers saw in it.“There are other ways for us to better invest our resources,” Hardiman said.Pasquale said Facebook’s new efforts represent “very slow steps” toward an acknowledgement that the company is making editorial judgments when it decides what news should be shown to users — and that it needs to empower journalists and editors to do so.But what needs to happen now, he added, is a broad shift in the company’s corporate culture, recognizing the expertise involved in journalistic judgment. The changes and features Facebook is putting out, he said, are being treated as “bug fixes” — addressing single problems the way engineers do.“What they are not doing is giving an overall account of their mission on how these fixes fit together,” Pasquale said.The “breaking news” label that Facebook is testing with 80 news publishers around the world will let outlets such as The Washington Post add a red label to indicate that a story is breaking news, highlighting it for users who want accurate information as things are happening.“Breaking news has to look different than a recipe,” Hardiman said.Another feature, called “Today In,” shows people breaking news in their area from local publishers, officials and organizations. It’s being tested out in 30 markets in the U.S. Hardiman says the goal is to help “elevate great local journalism.” The company is also funding news videos, created exclusively for Facebook by outside publishers it would not yet name. It plans to launch this feature in the next few months.Facebook says the trending section wasn’t a popular feature to begin with. It was available only in five countries and accounted for less than 1.5 per cent of clicks to the websites of news publishers, according to the company.While Facebook got outsized attention for the problems the trending section had — perhaps because it seemed popular with journalists and editors — neither its existence nor its removal makes much of a difference when it comes with Facebook’s broader problems with news.Hardiman said ending the trending section feels like letting a child go. But she said Facebook’s focus now is prioritizing trustworthy, informative news that people find useful. read more

Retailers homebuilders lead early slide in US stocks

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first_imgU.S. stocks moved broadly lower in early trading Thursday, extending the market’s losing streak into a sixth day. Losses among retailers, homebuilders and health care companies outweighed gains in technology stocks. The slide followed a sell-off in European indexes as the British pound slumped amid discord over a new deal for Britain’s exit from the European Union.KEEPING SCORE: The S&P 500 index fell 15 points, or 0.6 per cent, to 2,686 as of 10:08 a.m. Eastern Time. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 134 points, or 0.5 per cent, to 24,946. The Nasdaq composite dropped 24 points, or 0.3 per cent, to 7,111. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies gave up 6 points, or 0.4 per cent, to 1,496.The benchmark S&P 500 has declined five straight days. The indexes are now on track to finish the month with a loss.BREXIT: European markets were jittery over a flare-up in discord over British Prime Minister Theresa May’s plan for Britain’s departure from the European Union next year. She persuaded a majority in her Cabinet to back an agreement that would allow Britain to stay in a customs union while a trade treaty is negotiated, but the deal faces an uncertain fate in Parliament and two of her Cabinet ministers, including the Brexit minister, resigned in protest.The heightened uncertainty over making sure Britain’s departure from the European Union next year is smooth sent the pound lower against other currencies and hit British bank stocks. The disarray surrounding the process has thrown London’s future as a financial centre into jeopardy. U.S.-listed shares of Barclay’s slid 5.7 per cent to $8.49 and Royal Bank of Scotland plunged 9.4 per cent to $5.90.ROTTEN RETAIL: Several department store chains slumped. J.C. Penney fell 1.6 per cent to $1.20 after the company withdrew profit guidance and lowered its sales expectations for the year. Macy’s gave up 4.6 per cent to $31.69. Target dropped 2.9 per cent to $80.71.HOUSE OF PAIN: Homebuilders were trading lower. Lennar declined 3.8 per cent to $40.05, while PulteGroup lost 3.6 per cent to $23.67.TECH RALLY: Technology companies led the gainers. Cisco Systems rose 4.3 per cent to $46.24 a day after the company reported quarterly results that topped Wall Street’s forecasts.ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude rose 0.5 per cent to $56.60 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 1 per cent to $66.76 a barrel in London. Natural gas, which spiked Wednesday amid forecasts calling for a cold snap across much of the Northeast and South, slumped 10 per cent to $4.35 per 1,000 cubic feet.BOND YIELDS: Bond prices rose as traders continued to shift money into low-risk assets. That sent the 10-year Treasury note down to 3.09 per cent from 3.12 per cent late Wednesday.CURRENCIES: The dollar weakened to 113.25 yen from 113.51 yen on Wednesday. The euro fell to $1.1305 from $1.1338. The pound plunged to $1.2799 from $1.3038 on concerns that a new deal to enable the United Kingdom to separate from the European Union will not get approved by Britain’s parliament.OVERSEAS: Major indexes in Europe fell. German’s DAX dropped 0.5 per cent and France’s CAC 40 shed 1 per cent. London’s FTSE 100 slid 0.5 per cent. In Asia, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng added 1.7 per cent and Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 gave up 0.2 per cent. Seoul’s Kospi gained 1 per cent. India’s Sensex rose 0.6 per cent. Bangkok and New Zealand declined while Taiwan and other Southeast Asian markets rose.Alex Veiga, The Associated Presslast_img read more

A paradigm shift

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first_imgDigital entertainment has taken the country by storm in recent times. Society has witnessed the transition from traditional cable connections to DTH services. The latter streamlined customer-distributor-broadcaster interaction and earmarked the provision of channels and movies at user’s disposal. Then came Over-the-top (OTT) services which went mainstream 2018 onwards. OTT services changed the market equation altogether. Providing film and TV content via the internet without requiring users to subscribe to DTH services and hence entirely bypassing a multiple-system operator in the control or distribution of the content. The key OTT players – Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hotstar, Eros Now, JioTV – became a threat to the television providers only in the sense that they offered online streaming of all those flicks which otherwise were as good as premium provisions of these operators. The only essential prerequisite was the internet. The Internet brought attention to the data, its availability, and its consumption. For those who have not paid heed to India’s data leap, it may set in as a surprise that India, today, provides the lowest rate in the world for Mobile Data – mere Rs 18/GB aggregate – against a global average of Rs 600, as per the price comparison analysed by Cable.co.uk. Much of this is credited to the market upheaval that Jio brought upon its entry with data-based telecom services. Cheap data single-handedly boosted the OTT players’ morale for a wide business prospect, especially with the potential numbers (subscribers) that they could garner from India. So, Netflix and Amazon Prime extended their services to India, riding on the back of the telecom providers to aid their outreach and establish themselves. The telecom players coupled OTT services with their packages and priced them accordingly to accrue benefits to whichever length possible. Now, Netflix is testing mobile subscriptions of Rs 250 against their traditional plans ranging from Rs 500 – Rs 800 which is apparently expensive for India’s price-sensitive market. Netflix’s mobile subscription plan directly builds upon the smartphone base of India that has risen exponentially and expeditiously. India is the second largest smartphone market in the world after China with 430 million smartphone users. Simple math justifies Netflix’s move. The advent of OTT services and robust compliance from telecom fishes has bolstered the country’s data consumption – a win-win situation for both the stakeholders in the fray. Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc., have facilitated, first a need and then a market of, India-focussed and shows. Sacred Games took the country by storm and more flicks based on the region, and available in languages, have stormed Indian market and captivated wide public interest. OTT platforms’ outreach brings the international audience to a trove of Indian shows based on diverse issues and available in distinct languages.last_img read more

EC failed people of India silent spectator to BJPs excesses PC

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first_imgNew Delhi: Senior Congress leader P Chidambaram on Sunday accused the Election Commission of being “silent spectator” to the “excesses” of the BJP and to the utterances of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, saying the poll body has “largely failed” the people of India.The former Union Finance and Union Home Minister also said the plank of nationalism, propagated by the BJP, is a ploy to hide “failures” of the NDA government. “According to me, the Election Commission has largely failed the people of India. It has been a silent spectator to the excesses of the BJP, Mr Modi’s utterances and the enormous amount of money that has been spent by the BJP,” he told PTI in an interview. Also Read – J&K won’t remain UT forever, says ShahRecently, the opposition has complained to the EC alleging that the PM had “brazenly” violated the poll code by invoking armed forces repeatedly during his poll rallies and demanded that a campaign ban be imposed on him for some time. The Congress has said it has given 37 representations to the EC of which 10 can be categorised under “hate speeches, virulent, divisive, polarising” by Modi and BJP President Amit Shah. In the interview, Chidambaram answered questions ranging from the possibility of UPA-III coming to power after the Lok Sabha polls, recent searches by the Income Tax department, the CBI and Enforcement Directorate on some opposition leaders, besides other issues. Chidambaram claimed that the EC has been asking accounts of every opposition candidate and even on their small spendings like on a flag. “They (EC) are adding what it is called notional expenditure, to the expenditure account of the candidates. If you apply the same standard, every BJP candidate will be disqualified,” he said.last_img read more

Day after fire gutted shanties at Lalita Park DCW Chief meets affected

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first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Commission for Women (DCW) Chairperson Swati Maliwal on Sunday visited the Lalita Park jhuggis which were gutted in a fire two nights ago.She met the distressed women affected by the fire who narrated traumatic tales of loss. According to DCW, there were no casualties in the horrific incident but women and girls have been left without even a change of clothes and have lost all of their belongings. The Delhi government has set up shelters and basic requirement of food and water was being looked after. However, women and girls need urgent supplies of basic household items and compensation to start their life afresh. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehiclesDCW Chief met two women who were in deep trauma as their daughters are getting married in May 2019 and they lost all the items and cash they had arranged for the marriage. Even their train tickets to Bihar were burnt in the fire. DCW Chief recorded the statements of these women and assured complete support to them. “Swati Maliwal is writing to the DM to ensure full and urgent compensation to all aggrieved. Further, she is seeking special compensation for the women whose daughters are about to be married,” said DCW press statement. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarSwati Maliwal said, “I appeal to Delhi citizens to donate liberally to the families by providing clothes and household items to those affected by the fire. Delhi also needs to come forward and liberally donate to the women whose girls were about to be married and who lost everything in the fire. If anyone wishes to donate to these women, they can contact us at livingpositive@gmail.com and we shall connect you to them. We will try our best to rehabilitate them.”last_img read more

Allegri says combating racism is easy

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first_imgFor the Juventus manager, the Italian Lega Serie A has what it takes to fight racism but “there’s fear to make decisions.”Juventus coach Massimiliano Allegri believes there’s an easy way to combat racism in the Italian Lega Serie A.But according to him, there is a fear of making decisions stopping this fight.“This isn’t anything new, many have spoken about it just to fill their mouths,” Allegri said to Sport 360.“It’s very, very easy, it’s not a matter of splitting an atom in four. There are devices in the stadiums to identify who isn’t respecting the rules.”Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“If I’m not mistaken, the person who threw a banana at Aubameyang can’t go into stadiums anymore. In Italy, we have a problem: there’s fear to make decisions,” he added.“We are all scared of taking important decisions because these are very unpopular. You get him and you give him a lifetime ban.”“And then the second point [on making an on-pitch response]; say there is a penalty and racist abuse starts, what are we supposed to do?” he commented.“This thing amuses me because I have heard many pundits saying this and that. In Italy, we are world champions in these cases. Instead of hushing and acting, we all make big speeches when it’s better to hush.”last_img read more

KPBSD Additional Funding Request From Borough Up For Public Comment

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first_imgKenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce was absent at the meeting on April 2, but previously spoke with KSRM News regarding the request for additional funding from the district: “I’ve written a letter to the school district sharing all of our numbers with them, and we wrote a letter to the employees within the borough explaining to them that should the$2.4 million dollar additional funding request be approved by the assembly that there are consequences. I’m laying it out to the assembly as well, we are putting a strong fiscally responsible plan together so that services can continue.” A resolution for the request for additional funding was introduced at the borough assembly meeting on April 2. There will be a public hearing on the request for  $2,423,955 in FY19 from the borough at their meeting on April 16. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai Peninsula Borough will be taking public testimony on a request from the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District for $2,423,955 in FY19 from the borough due to the state reduction in funding. In the request from the district, the additional funding would allow the school district to retain some of the non-tenured staff for FY20, as well as provide a cushion in the event of possible state reductions in funding.last_img read more

New York and The New Yorker Dominate Ellie Awards Once Again

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first_imgNEW YORK—Despite honoring an industry in never-ending flux, much about the 2018 National Magazine Awards (or the Ellies, named for the accompanying elephant-shaped trophy) remained consistent with well-established tradition.Wine and cocktails flowed liberally, a TV news anchor reaffirmed the importance of journalism amid trying times (in between quips about the presence of Anna Wintour and Joanna Coles), and Adam Moss and David Remnick—editors of New York magazine and The New Yorker, respectively—wore thin the Cipriani ballroom’s carpeting during repeated trips to the stage to collect honors on behalf of their publications.What was glaringly different about this year’s 53rd annual Ellies was the omission of its most prestigious award: Magazine of the Year. The American Society of Magazine Editors, which administers the awards, indicated that the move was a reflection of the fact the Ellies are no longer confined to honoring print magazines alone. Replacing Magazine of the Year are two new categories: one for social media and one for digital innovation. “Now that every category is open to digital content, ASME believes that the goal of the Ellies—to recognize editorial excellence in a wide range of publications—is better served by focusing attention on the finalists and winners in the four General Excellence categories,” said ASME in a statement announcing the change.“It’s a bit like the Oscars deciding to stop giving out an award for Best Picture,” opined one publisher in attendance.What remains constant, however, is the Ellies’ commitment to honoring truly inspiring work from some of the best and brightest in the industry—not just in news and general interest reporting, but in sports, food, personal service, entertainment, lifestyle, criticism, fiction, design, and photography.The big winners this year, like in so many previous years (and not undeservedly so), were New York, which took home three wins among ten nominations, and The New Yorker, which also won three awards, among eight nominations.Apart from Moss and Remnick, the guest of honor was Metropolitan Home, Saveur, and Garden Design founding editor Dorothy Kalins, who joins the likes of Tina Brown, Graydon Carter, Hugh Hefner, and Gloria Steinem in the now 29-member Magazine Editors’ Hall of Fame.The four General Excellence winners, which, according to ASME, are now the most prestigious honors, were Aperture (for Literature, Science, and Politics), San Francisco magazine (Special Interest), T: The New York Times Style Magazine (Service and Lifestyle), and The New Yorker (News, Sports, and Entertainment).After Outside editor and ASME president Chris Keyes honored the previously announced winner of the ASME Award for Fiction (Zoetrope: All-Story‘s second consecutive win) and the five honorees of the ASME Next Awards, honoring magazine journalists under 30, “CNN Tonight” anchor Don Lemon took to the stage to begin the proceedings in earnest.“It’s been a tough year for all of us,” Lemon quipped. “I was 25 when it all started.”The first winner, in the Public Interest category, was The New Yorker, for Ronan Farrow’s reporting, which helped to break open the Harvey Weinstein scandal. It was The New Yorker‘s eighth win all-time in the category.Cosmopolitan then scored a repeat victory in the Personal Service category for its October story, “How to Run for Office,” followed by W, which earned its fourth Ellie award for photography.W editor Stefano Tonchi, accepting the award, said that the magazine tried to get celebrities to do something different and special in their portraits, “like a man kissing a man or a woman kissing a woman.”“Men kissing men and women kissing women,” replied Lemon, returning to the podium. “I’m here for all of it.”After Aperture won for General Excellence: Literature, Science and Politics, Texas Monthly earned the Ellie for Leisure Interests, for its July feature, “The Golden Age of BBQ.” Accepting the award was Tim Taliaferro, who stepped aside as EIC of the magazine just two weeks ago amid some controversy.Honored in the Single-Topic Issue category was National Geographic, which famously stepped outside of its yellow box for the January issue titled “Gender Revolution.”“I have never, in 38 years of journalism, had a reaction the way we did after we put a nine-year-old transgender girl on the cover,” said editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg, adding that readers credited the issue with enabling conversations they couldn’t have had before.After wins by New York and Time/Mic in the Columns/Commentary and Video categories, respectively, Alex Tizon earned a posthumous Ellie Award for Essays and Criticism for his viral June 2017 story in The Atlantic, “My Family’s Slave.”Next, Self, which shuttered its print edition at the end of 2016, earned the first-ever Ellie for Social Media.“This was a really huge pivot and change for us,” said editor-in-chief Carolyn Kylstra, accepting the award. “I’m so proud of the team and what we accomplished. When you no longer have that flagship property, everything else has to become the flagship property.”New York had two separate sections nominated in the Magazine Section category, which was won by its trendspotting section, “The Strategist.”The other first-time category, Digital Innovation, went to SB Nation, for its July feature about what football will look like in the future—which the category’s judges affectionately deemed “an online acid trip.”“Holy shit,” remarked editor Elena Bergeron.Among other winners and nominees of note, TMC Pulse—the monthly magazine serving Texas Medical Center—earned a surprise nomination in the Feature Writing category (GQ won). And despite losing out to T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Bon Appétit earned an eighth consecutive nomination in the General Excellence: Service and Lifestyle category.View the full list of Ellie Award winners here.2018 Ellie Awards Finalists (Winners in Bold)General ExcellenceNews, Sports and EntertainmentThe New Yorker; The Atlantic; The California Sunday Magazine; National Geographic; New YorkService and LifestyleT: The New York Times Style Magazine; Bon Appétit; Eater; Saveur; Teen VogueSpecial InterestSan Francisco; Bicycling; Inc.; Outside; Texas MonthlyLiterature, Science and Politics Aperture; The Marshall Project; Oxford American; Popular Science; Virginia Quarterly ReviewPublic InterestThe New Yorker for “Abuses of Power,” October 23 print issue, “Weighing the Costs of Speaking Out About Harvey Weinstein,” October 27 at newyorker.com, and “Harvey Weinstein’s Army of Spies,” November 6 at newyorker.com, by Ronan FarrowHarper’s Magazine for “Where Health Care Won’t Go,” by Helen Ouyang, JuneThe New Yorker for “The Takeover,” by Rachel Aviv, October 9ProPublica and NPR for “The Last Person You’d Expect to Die in Childbirth,” by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR, May 12, “Lost Mothers,” by Nina Martin, Emma Cillekens and Alessandra Freitas, July 17, and “Nothing Protects Black Women From Dying in Pregnancy and Childbirth,” by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR, December 7, at propublica.orgVanity Fair for “The 5th Risk,” September, and “Made in the U.S.D.A.,” December, by Michael LewisPersonal ServiceCosmopolitan for “How to Run for Office,” reporting by Laura Brounstein, Meredith Bryan, Jessica Goodman, Emily C. Johnson, Tess Koman, Rachel Mosely, Rebecca Nelson and Helen Zook, October 10 at cosmopolitan.com and November print issueConsumer Reports for “Too Many Meds? America’s Love Affair With Prescription Medication,” by Teresa Carr, August 3 at consumerreports.orgGrist for “Ask Umbra’s 21-Day Apathy Detox,” by Umbra Fisk, April 17 at grist.orgSeventeen for “This Is a Story About Suicide,” by Andrea Stanley, November/DecemberWomen’s Health for the article “Wakey Wakey!” by Malia Jacobson, December print issue; “Sleep Center,” December 11 on womenshealthmag.com; and the video “Wakey Wakey!,” December 11 on facebook.com/womenshealthmagazinePhotographyW; GQ Style; National Geographic; New York; Virginia Quarterly ReviewDesignGQ; Bon Appétit; ESPN The Magazine; Men’s Health; WiredLeisure Interests5280 for “The 5280 Guide to Four Corners,” by Kasey Cordell, SeptemberBicycling for “How Cycling Works,” OctoberBon Appétit for “A Simple Roast Chicken,” by Amiel Stanek, OctoberNew York for “The Encyclopedia of Vegan Food,” by Robin Raisfeld and Rob Patronite, November 13-26Texas Monthly for “The Golden Age of BBQ,” by Daniel Vaughn, JuneSingle-Topic IssueNational Geographic for “Gender Revolution,” JanuaryThe California Sunday Magazine for “A Teenage Life,” December 3Columbia Journalism Review for “The Trump Issue,” FallNew York for “My New York,” October 16-29The New York Times Magazine for “The New York Issue,” June 4Feature PhotographyThe New Yorker for “Faces of an Epidemic,” photographs by Philip Montgomery, October 30 at newyorker.comThe New Republic for “Charlottesville’s Faces of Hate,” photographs by Mark Peterson, August 14 at newrepublic.comNew York for “The 43-Day Fashion Shoot,” photographs by Holly Andres, August 20 at thecut.comTIME for “Death Reigns on the Streets of Duterte’s Philippines,” photographs by James Nachtwey, January 16Vogue for “American Women,” photographs by Lynsey Addario, Evgenia Arbugaeva, Daniel Arnold, Jonas Bendiksen, Cass Bird, Charlie Engman, Alex Majoli, Bella Newman, Jackie Nickerson, Benjamin Rasmussen, Stefan Ruiz, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Lorna Simpson, Deanna and Ed Templeton and Mayan Toledano, March 8 at vogue.comMagazine SectionNew York for “The Strategist”Backpacker for “The Play List”Bon Appétit for “Starters”Martha Stewart Weddings for “Planner”New York for “The Culture Pages”Website New York; The Marshall Project; National Geographic; Pitchfork; VogueSocial MediaSELF; Mother Jones; The New Yorker; Seventeen; TIMEVideoTIME and Mic for “Life After Addiction,” video by Aja Harris and Paul Moakley, November 8 at time.comThe Atlantic for “What Will Happen to Undocumented Doctors?,” video by Jeremy Raff, February 2The New Yorker for “A Fever Dream at Beautycon,” video by Tim Hussin, September 18The Outline for “The Republican Who Quit the Party Because of Trump,” March 22Vogue for “We Are All Fabulous . . . ,” video by Oliver Hadlee Pearch, February 24; “Paris, Je T’aime,” video by Gordon von Steiner, July 20; and “Workin’ 9 to 5 . . . Inside the Vogue Office!,” video by Charlotte Wales, September 25Digital InnovationSB Nation for “17776: An American Football Story,” by Jon Bois, July 5HuffPost Highline for “FML,” by Michael Hobbes, December 14The Marshall Project With Condé Nast Entertainment and Participant Media for “We Are Witnesses,” by Jenny Carchman, October 26 at themarshallproject.orgNational Geographic Traveler for “North: An Illustrated Travelogue,” by Christoph Niemann, April 4TIME for “Finding Home: 3 Babies, 3 Families, 1 Year,” photographs by Lynsey Addario, reporting by Aryn Baker,  video by Francesca Trianni, December 18ReportingThe New York Times Magazine for “The Uncounted,” by Azmat Khan and Anand Gopal, November 19The California Sunday Magazine with the Investigative Fund for “Below Deck,” by Lizzie Presser, February 5ESPN The Magazine for “Sin City or Bust,” April 24, “Standing Down,” November 13, and “Roger Goodell Has a Jerry Jones Problem,” December 4, by Don Van Natta Jr. and Seth WickershamHarper’s Magazine with the Investigative Fund for “Ghost Nation,” by Nick Turse, JulyNational Geographic and ProPublica for “How the U.S. Triggered a Massacre in Mexico,” by Ginger Thompson, June 12 at propublica.orgThe New York Times Magazine With ProPublica for “Kushnerville,” by Alec MacGillis, May 28The New Yorker for “On the Brink,” by Evan Osnos, September 18Feature WritingGQ for “A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, SeptemberThe Atlantic for “My President Was Black,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, January/FebruaryThe Atlantic for “A Death at Penn State,” by Caitlin Flanagan, NovemberThe New York Times Magazine for “The Mailroom,” by Jeanne Marie Laskas, January 22TMC Pulse for “Alan Dickson’s Final Days,” by Alexandra Becker, JulyVirginia Quarterly Review for “The Useful Village,” by Ben Mauk, SpringWired With Epic Magazine for “Love in the Time of Robots,” by Alex Mar, NovemberEssays and CriticismThe Atlantic for “Lola’s Story,” by Alex Tizon, JuneElle for “Her Eyes Were Watching the Stars,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, JuneNew York for “The Uninhabitable Earth,” by David Wallace-Wells, July 10-23The New Yorker for “Losing Streak,” by Kathryn Schulz, February 13 and 20Smithsonian for “What Ever Happened to the Russian Revolution?” by Ian Frazier, OctoberColumns and CommentaryNew York for three columns by Rebecca Traister: “Why the Harvey Weinstein Sexual-Harassment Allegations Didn’t Come Out Until Now,” October 5, “Your Reckoning. And Mine.,” November 12, and “This Moment Isn’t (Just) About Sex. It’s Really About Work,” December 10, at thecut.comBuzzFeed News for three columns by Bim Adewunmi: “How the Oscar Flub Demonstrates the Limits of Black Graciousness,” March 1, “How Oprah Got Her Acting Groove Back,” April 10, and “Maria Sharapova’s Rivalry With Serena Williams Is in Her Head,” September 9ESPN The Magazine for three columns by Howard Bryant: “The Williams Movement,” February 27, “Power Play,” April 24, and “How Is This Still a Debate?” December 4Longreads for three columns by Laurie Penny: “The Horizon of Desire” October 10, “We’re All Mad Here: Weinstein, Women, and the Language of Lunacy,” October 23, and “The Unforgiving Minute,” November 7Pitchfork for three columns by Jayson Greene: “Is Rihanna the Most Influential Pop Singer of the Past Decade?” April 5, “Can Music Heal Trauma? Exploring the Therapeutic Powers of Sound,” September 20, and “Do Androids Dream of Electric Guitars? Exploring the Future of Musical A.I.,” June 12last_img read more

Budget Agreement Should Put Authorization Bill Back on Track

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first_imgThe bipartisan budget deal, by raising the discretionary spending caps for both defense and non-defense programs, should provide the fix needed for President Obama to sign a fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill.Obama’s primary objection to the defense measure he vetoed last week stemmed from its reliance on the overseas contingency operations (OCO) account which allowed the Pentagon to skirt the caps without providing equivalent budget relief for non-defense programs. On Tuesday the White House applauded the budget agreement, signaling that its concerns over the funding framework employed in the authorization bill likely were now moot.The only question left is what path the authorization bill will take to becoming law. Democrats could support an override or lawmakers could revise the measure to reflect the new agreement, reported CQ. The authorization bill already includes language allowing a portion of the $38 billion allocated to the OCO account to be shifted to the department’s base budget if a deal were reached to lift the caps.Mac Thornberry (R-Texas), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said he wasn’t sure how the chamber’s Nov. 5 override would turn out now that the primary reason for Obama’s veto appears to have been addressed.“It’s a little ironic to me that the president who vetoes the bill based on OCO to meet base requirements agrees to a deal where there is $8 billion of OCO to meet base requirements,” Thornberry said. Some of the boost in defense spending under the deal would come from an extra $8 billion included in the OCO account for defense. Another $8 billion added to that account would be allocated to foreign affairs. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Microsoft brings Windows Defender to Chrome and Firefox

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first_img Chrome Firefox Microsoft Mozilla Here’s how to use Google’s Password Checkup tool 1:15 2 Now playing: Watch this: Microsoft wants Windows PCs to be safe from malicious URLs. Sarah Tew/CNET Microsoft has launched its Windows Defender extensions for Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome. The company said its goal was to extend its container technology to other browsers and give customers a way to protect themselves against browser-based attacks. The extensions automatically redirect untrusted navigations to Windows Defender Application Guard for Microsoft Edge, Windows Insider program head Dona Sokar and senior program manager Brandon LeBlanc said in a blog post on Friday. When you visit a site, Windows Defender checks the URL against a list of trusted sites. If the site is deemed malicious, you’ll be redirected to an isolated Microsoft Edge session. From there, you can travel to any site that hasn’t been defined as trusted by your organization without any risk to the rest of your system. “With our upcoming dynamic switching capability, if the user tries to go to a trusted site while in an isolated Microsoft Edge session, the user is taken back to the default browser,” Sokar and LeBlanc said. For now, the Windows Defender Application Guard extension for Chrome and Firefox is just for Windows Insiders with Windows 10 and Pro SKUs on 1803 or later. Microsoft said it’ll be available more generally “very soon.” Microsoft Edge News • Microsoft Edge browser will block intrusive ads Tags Preview • Microsoft rethinks the browser with Edge (hands-on) Share your voice Internet Internet Services Commentslast_img read more

The comic nation comes alive

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first_imgThe 4th Annual Comic Con kicked off with a grand start on Friday, 7 February, with huge crowd hindering free movement. A comic and/or custom stuff lover’s way of socialising and finding more stuff which he/she will need, the fourth iteration is already a huge hit even though this is the first time it is being held outside their usual venue Delhi Haat. This time around, Comic Con has an exhibition of works of Charles M Schulz, the creator of Peanuts. The visitors are greeted by the exhibition gallery upon entering the venue. What more has changed is that now, the venue is divided in two zones, one being a display and engagement zone for introducing people to the new stuff. Sony has a stall here and has put up its latest console, the PlayStation 4 for the visitors to enjoy. There is also LAN gaming zone here. The second zone has all the merchandise stores and is the real crowd puller, like the previous three iterations. From comics to pillows and even slippers, everything that can accommodate a Batman or Superman is available for sale. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Not to forget, various visitors are here dressed as comic characters. Talk about Bleach, Naruto, Asterix, etc and you will see them all here. For those who want to see more, there is our desi SuperKudi too. Talk about India amongst the comic giants and there you go. The extravaganza is on from 7 to 9 February at Thyagraj Stadium near INA Colony. Do not miss this one. For those who have never been to one of these events, start now and make ‘history’. You will not regret being at this place at any hour, that is a promise.WHERE: Thyagraj StadiumWHEN: On till 9 Februarylast_img read more

Firstborn kids more likely to be nearsighted

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first_imgFirst-born children run higher risk of becoming nearsighted later in life, compared with their later-born siblings, a study says.Parents pushing the eldest kid to do better in studies may be partly blamed for the higher myopia risk among the first-borns, the researcher found.“Our study provides an extra piece of evidence linking education and myopia, consistent with the very high prevalence of myopia in countries with intensive education from an early age,” study author Jeremy Guggenheim, of Cardiff University in Britain, was quoted as saying. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’For the study, researchers examined birth order and nearsightedness in about 89,000 people, aged 40 to 69, in Britain. First-borns were 10 per cent more likely to be nearsighted and 20 per cent more likely to be severely nearsighted than their subsequent siblings, the findings showed, the study said.Reduced parental investment in education of children with later birth order may be partly responsible, the researchers said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixEducation accounted for about 25 per cent of the link between birth order and the risk of nearsightedness.However, in addition to education, there may be other, unmeasured factors that could partially mediate the relationship between birth order and one’s risk of nearsightedness, Live Science reported.The study was published in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.last_img read more

Indians more comfortable socialising online

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first_imgOwing by the surge in social media usage among Indians, one-third of the country’s below-35 people feel more comfortable socialising online than in real life, a new survey has revealed. The survey conducted by Kissanpur reveals that 65 per cent respondents in Bengaluru said they are more comfortable with virtual socialising, followed by 33 per cent respondents from Mumbai reiterating the same. As many as 70 per cent of the respondents in Bengaluru and 43 per cent in Mumbai say they get to know about the lives of their friends and relatives mainly online. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’When it comes to children, 53 per cent Indians believe that their wards need coaxing or take very long to make new friends. This trend is largely seen in Bengaluru, Mumbai and Lucknow. Furthermore, 38 per cent Indians are either just acquaintances with their neighbour or they do not even know their neighbours at all. This number is significantly higher in Bengaluru with 68 per cent agreeing with this observation, followed by Delhi and Lucknow. They are mere strangers who share a courtesy smile or meet casually in the elevator. Some don’t even know their neighbour’s names.last_img read more

PEOPLE Farrill ex Air Canada now on Brand USA account at Pulse

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first_img[PEOPLE] Farrill, ex Air Canada, now on Brand USA account at Pulse Travel Marketing Posted by Credit: Linked InTORONTO — Cynthia Farrill has joined Pulse Travel Marketing Inc., tapped to help manage the Brand USA travel trade account for Pulse from its Toronto-based office.Farrill will have support from Patrice Bell and the Pulse offices in Montreal and Vancouver and the Pulse PR and Marketing teams. She recently retired from Air Canada where she was Manager, Sales Development, Global Sales for eight years, capping a 40-year career with the airline.“We are honoured to have Cynthia on board with us and know that we will benefit from her many years as a well-respected airline operations and travel and tourism manager,” said Sana Keller, Managing Partner, Pulse Travel Marketing.  Farrill has demonstrated expertise in developing and managing successful key customer and client partnerships and relationships within the international travel trade, added Keller.  “We are confident that Farrill will help drive client success with her results oriented, sharp business acumen and delightful, yet steely determination.”More news:  GLP Worldwide introduces first-ever Wellness programsFarrill can be reached at cfarrill@thebrandusa.ca or locally at 647-643-7856. Share Tags: Air Canada, America, Peoplecenter_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Tuesday, May 2, 2017 Travelweek Group last_img read more

August 20 2014This is the second report about the

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first_imgAugust 20, 2014This is the second report about the Keystone project.The crew is chipping away at the ramp in the middle of the keystone.[photo and text by Sue Kirsch]Here is a view of the work site from the top of East Crescent Unit 6.The material is graded and the rocks are sorted out, so it can be used in the concrete work.[photo by Lorenzo Mastino]More to come.last_img