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Huskies outgun Blades

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first_imgIt took a couple of periods to pull away, but the Huskies outplayed Beaverlodge on Friday night, and got the two points they wanted.It was the Blades who opened the scoring, when Taylor Jones picked up the puck in his zone, on a Huskies powerplay.  Jones poked the puck around Linden Apsassin, soared down the left wing, and buried a shot low to the glove side on Ty Gullickson. But, the Huskies still had time remaining on the powerplay, and evened the tables just 16 seconds later, when Tyson Pederson found the puck on his stick in the slot, and rang it off the back bar.  “I had lots of time and lots of room after a good pass from Darcy Bell” Pederson said.   The defenceman fired the puck home like a natural goal scorer, and says his confidence is riding high early in the season. “I’m totally healthy now, and good to go” he said.- Advertisement -A few minutes later, Pederson again found himself alone in the slot.   This time, the pass was in his skates, so he calmly dished it to Cody Kalb, who deposited it past Beaverlodge goalie Cody Gayse.  Before the second period was out, Beaverlodge evened the score on the powerplay, when Aaron Dumas fired a point shot through traffic and past Gullickson, to make it 2-2 after 20 minutes.In the second period, the Huskies seemed to find their groove, and controlled the vast majority of play.  For extended periods, the pups cycled the puck, and almost made even-strength hockey look like a powerplay.  But, the Blades goaltender and defence withstood the attack, and it remained 2-2 after two periods.Finally, in the third period, the flood gates opened, and the Huskies pulled away.  Cam MacKinnon got things going, when he took a Robbie Sidhu feed and fired it past Gayse.  Seven minutes in, Sidhu set up another, when he brought the puck into the Blades zone, and delayed long enough to find Cody Hildebrand driving to the net.Advertisement After Hildebrand’s goal, Huskies Captain Payden Wongstedt fought Blade Josh Majoros. Majoros fought well, but was favouring his left arm afterwards.  He was eventually treated by paramedics, diagnosed with a dislocated shoulder.On the ice, the Huskies continued to pressure.  Cody Kalb scored his second of the game when Dylan Apsassin stole a puck in Beaverlodge territory, and gave it to Kalb, who banked it off Gayse and in.  Kole Norris and Kyle Porter added two more quick goals, sending Gayse to the bench, and Beaverlodge backup Brett Hommy into the game.Hommy allowed just one goal, when Brighton Campbell busted down the left side, and found trailer Carter Sali, who notched the first goal of his rookie season.  Beaverlodge would add a late consolation goal, when Bobby Bailey banged a rebound past Gullickson for Beaverlodge’s second powerplay goal of the game.And, as the final horn sounded, Cody Kalb squared off with Blade Nick Fitzpatrick, giving Kalb a ‘Gordie Howe hat-trick’, and giving the North Peace Arena crowd one last reason to cheer.Advertisement The Huskies won the game 8-3, in a game that was likely their best so far of the season.  Their coaching staff seemed duly impressed with their performance.  “I thought it was a good effort for 60 minutes” said Coach Bob Kalb after the game.   “They battled hard” he said, “but we’re so much bigger and stronger that I think they just wore down finally.” [asset|aid=1978|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=341b4f482c3b0f17317596e068d3b182-bob-inevitable_1_Pub.mp3]Coach Kalb was also happy with Tyson Negus’ effort, in his first game as a Husky.  “He was a little excited at times, running around and out of position, but he did some good things” said Kalb, adding “I like the way Tyson skates, and competes, and he’ll only get better.”The Huskies will hope to match Friday’s performance when they visit Whitecourt on Saturday for their first matchup of the season against the vaunted Wolverines.  Whitecourt beat Slave Lake 6-4 on Friday, meaning the Wolverines (5-0) remain one point ahead of the Huskies in the NWJHL standings.  Coach Kalb knows Saturday’s game in Whitecourt is a big test for his club, though he thinks his team is prepared. [asset|aid=1979|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=341b4f482c3b0f17317596e068d3b182-bob-tomorrow_1_Pub.mp3]In other Huskies news, Payden Wongstedt has been officially named the team Captain. Brennan Billey is also expected to join the team soon, likely next weekend.last_img read more

Chelsea v Southampton: Cahill back

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first_imgCaptain Gary Cahill returns to the Chelsea starting line-up after missing Saturday’s FA Cup semi-final because of illness.Diego Costa and Eden Hazard, who started on the bench at the weekend, return to the side, while Cesc Fabregas is selected ahead of Pedro, who is among the substitutes.Former Chelsea man Oriol Romeu returns for Southampton after completing a suspension, but the visitors are without the injured Sam McQueen.Chelsea: Courtois; Azpilicueta, David Luiz, Cahill; Moses, Kante, Matic, Alonso; Fabregas, Costa, HazardSubs: Begovic, Ake, Terry, Chalobah, Willian, Pedro, Batshuayi.Southampton: Forster, Cédric, Stephens, Yoshida, Bertrand, Romeu, Davis, Ward-Prowse, Tadić, Boufal, Gabbiadini.Subs: Hassen, Caceres, Clasie, Hojbjerg, Long, Redmond, Rodriguez.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Busy weekend for HSU teams

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first_imgThe Jacks, who will also host four games next … A home stand in softball and the Green and Gold Scrimmage in football highlight a busy weekend for Humboldt State sports.On Saturday at the Redwood Bowl, the Jacks will close out three weeks of spring football with the annual intra-squad scrimmage open to the public.The game gets under way at 1 p.m.In softball, meanwhile, HSU will host conference leaders Chico State, with the series getting under way with a doubleheader today at 1 p.m.last_img

Giants face tough decisions with bench, bullpen

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first_imgSCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–In his final start of Cactus League play, Giants ace Madison Bumgarner lasted just two innings and allowed seven earned runs against the Kansas City Royals.The outing was far more successful than his last appearance on a spring training mound in 2018.Last March, Royals leadoff hitter Whit Merrifield smoked a line drive off of Bumgarner’s pitching hand that fractured the lefty’s fifth metacarpal, sending him to the injured list for the first two months of the season.His …last_img

Apache Co-Founder, Mozilla Board Member, Becomes New CTO of World Economic Forum

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first_imgRelated Posts Brian Behlendorf, primary developer of the Apache Web Server, co-founder of the world’s first dedicated commercial web site creation company and a member of the Mozilla board has joined the World Economic Forum as the organization’s CTO, he announced on Twitter this morning.The World Economic Forum hosts an annual meeting of international economic players in Davos, Switzerland and issues a number of massive econometric reports detailing the development conditions in the various countries around the world. The organization regularly engages with emerging web technology, from actively hosting bloggers at its conference to highlighting tech startups around the world to considering inclusion of social-media censorship and freedom among its considerations when evaluating countries’ preparedness for economic development. Those evaluations make or break huge international investments. The addition of Behlendorf as the organization’s CTO is being celebrated around Twitter as a good move for the organization’s relationship with the open web.The World Economic Forum has also faced extensive criticism as a pompous gathering of elitist international agents of economic exploitation and their non-profit, do-gooder, hangers-on.Behlendorf, aged 37, was told by game programming supernerd Alex Rosenberg on Twitter that “I can’t tell if that’s awesome or if you’re now ‘The Man.’” Behlendorf replied that “the answer is yes and yes.” Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market marshall kirkpatrickcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#international#news#NYT#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

UAAP Season 80 Preview: Sablan vows different UST Tigers will show up

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first_imgUAAP SEASON 80 PREVIEW: UST Growling Tigers428 viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Coach: Boy SablanLast Season: 3-11 (8th Place)Holdovers: Marvin Lee, Jeepy FaundoAdditions: Steve Akomo, Christian Garcia, Jordan Sta. AnaKey Losses: Louie Vigil, Jon Sheriff, Renzo Subido, Mario BonleonCoach Boy Sablan acknowledges that after last year’s disastrous run, the UAAP Season 80 campaign will be make or break for him in University of Santo Tomas.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Gilas Pilipinas joins Fiba Asia Champions Cup in China Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST PLAY LIST 01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST00:50Trending Articles01:37PNP vows dismissal for cadets in alleged hazing at PNPA02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games With key figures from last season’s campaign gone, the Growling Tigers will lean on veterans Marvin Lee and Jeepy Faundo to carry the fight.But Sablan believes that UST’s unpredictability makes it dangerous, as he expects several players to step up unlike others who depend largely on only one go-to guy.“You won’t rely on just one person. Everybody can be depended on. There are no main guys. I’m not particular on one, two, or three players. Now, I have more confidence on my players. I trust what they can do on the court.”While he’s not willing to make any promises, he guarantees that UST will be better prepared for the challenges that this season brings.“No promises,” he said. “That the team prepared well and we’ll try do everything we practiced the last eight months during the games. You’ll see the changes in our players. That’s one thing you have to watch out for. You’ll see the difference.”ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo But Sablan is willing to take on all comers in his second season at the helm for the Growling Tigers with a squad that he can proudly say is his own.“I built this team unlike last year’s. When I arrived, I had no choice but to run with whatever I had. This time, I’m in control of everything. We had a longer preparation this time and I believe we’re in a better groove,” said Sablan in Filipino.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingParading a mix of veterans and new recruits, Sablan is confident with the group that is slowly showing signs of maturity after the numerous pocket tournaments it participated in in the run up for this season.We had a longer time to prepare, not like before that we only had two months of preparation. So now, we’re running a bit better. The system I was trying to instill last year is finally happening. The bottomline is we had a longer preparation,” said Sablan.center_img Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul View commentslast_img read more

Money pours in but doctors botch up volleyball player Arunima Sinha’s treatment

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first_imgArunima SinhaAmid the outpouring of sympathy and financial aid for injured national volleyball and football player Arunima Sinha, generous amounts of which were doled out to score political brownie points, a crucial aspect was bypassed – the quality of medical attention being delivered to her.The 23-year-old athlete, who lost her left leg after being pushed off a moving train by goons, underwent a second surgery at Lucknow’s Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj Medical University (CSMMU) on Sunday owing to an infection in the amputated limb. She was shifted from Bareilly District Hospital on Saturday noon after developing multiple complications.Apart from the swelling and infection, Arunima’s haemoglobin level had plummeted because of excessive bleeding.This necessitated an emergency blood transfusion on Saturday night. She has been given two bottles of blood since she was admitted to the Lucknow hospital.Officially, her condition continued to be serious but stable. Earlier, however, CSMMU chief medical superintendent Prof SN Shankhwar said a team of doctors decided to re-perate the athlete’s left leg to save her life.The doctors revealed that she had undergone debridement under general anesthesia. Debridement surgery is done to help wounds heal quickly. She was also found to have suffered multiple fractures on her right leg.Shankhwar said she had been admitted under Prof Vineet Sharma and Dr Santosh Kumar of the department of orthopaedic surgery. Her case was that of traumatic below- knee amputation on the left leg with compound fracture on the right leg.No wonder Arunima’s mother Gyanbala had a sinking feeling when she saw her at CSMMU. “I was horrified by what I saw when the doctors were cleaning the wounds on her amputated left leg. It was rotten up to her knee. There was moist dead tissue around the area. That portion of her limb has become numb. I am a health supervisor in Ambedkar Nagar and realised that the situation is serious,” Gyanbala said, recounting her brief meeting with her daughter who was in agony.advertisementThe medical teams treating Arunima inexplicably kept her family members in the dark. “I fail to understand why the doctors are not telling me the actual condition of my daughter. Late on Friday night, all of a sudden I was told by the Bareilly doctors that she would have to be shifted to CSMMU’s Trauma Centre at Lucknow. Although they were very supportive, they didn’t tell me what the problem was. I also overheard some doctors saying that she should be shifted to a Delhi hospital,” a worried Gyanbala said.”The authorities took five days to shift her from Bareilly to Lucknow. It is only five days after the incident that we have come to know that she has fractured her right leg as well,” she added.”While we are receiving help from all quarters, I’m just hoping that my daughter survives this ordeal. I want people to pray for her recovery. The Railways and CISF have agreed to give her a job. The Union sports ministry, UP government, Samajwadi Party, two cricket players and many individuals have extended their support to us,” she said.Arunima’s elder sister Lakshmi Sinha said: “The attention of the entire nation is fixed on her. We believe the doctors would have saved her leg if she was directly brought to Lucknow. But this is not the time for levelling allegations.”Divulging details of the treatment, Shankhwar said: “The left leg stump wound was full of slough and necrotic tissue. All superficial debris was removed. The patient was then planned for debridement under general anesthesia after her haemoglobin built up. She is currently admitted in the high dependency ward of the Trauma Centre.”For his part, Bareilly District Hospital medical superintendent Dr Vijay Yadav said: “We did our best and recommended that she be shifted to Lucknow as soon as we saw some improvement in her health. A doctor and a pharmacist here even donated blood for Arunima.”At Lucknow, Prof. Abbas Ali Mehdi, who is in charge of the Trauma Centre, said: “The hospital authorities have decided to treat her free of cost. We are giving her the best possible medical care.” The doctors also said that two CISF jawans, Ram Pal and Thakur Das, had given their blood for Arunima on Saturday.The victim and her family have indeed been flooded with offers of help. In the latest such case, the IIIT, Allahabad, announced that it would give her a highly advanced artificial limb free of cost. IIIT director M. D. Tiwari said: “We have developed an artificial leg which would even enable her to run as fast as she used to. We want her to resume playing.”advertisementEarlier, cricketers Yuvraj Singh and Harbhajan Singh offered her Rs 1 lakh each in aid. Union sports minister Ajay Maken also announced a medical compensation of Rs 2 lakh and an immediate ex gratia of Rs 25,000 for her.Uttar Pradesh chief minister Mayawati said Arunima would be given financial assistance to the tune of Rs 1 lakh by her government.Apart from this, Arunima has been offered jobs by the Railways and CRPF. The internationally acclaimed artificial limbs provider, Bhagwan Mahaveer Viklang Sahayata Samiti, also volunteered to equip her with the Jaipur Foot free of cost.Meanwhile, even after a lapse of five days, the GRP has failed to identify the miscreants who had thrown Arunima out of the train.Additional director general of Railways AK Jain had said the culprits would be nabbed with the help of sketches and announced a reward of Rs 15,000 to those who would help in catching them.last_img read more

Cocaine Smuggled to New Zealand on Maersk Ships Hull

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first_imgNew Zealand authorities have seized the country’s largest cocaine shipment which arrived to the port of Tauranga hidden in a compartment attached to the underwater hull of Maersk Antares container vessel.A spokesperson from Maersk Line confirmed that the shipment was discovered on October 31, when the boxship arrived to Tauranga from Chile in the late evening hours.New Zealand’s Customs Service informed that members of a trans-national drug syndicate approached the ship and retrieved the cocaine, with a street value of around NZD 20 million (USD 13.8 million), from the compartment.The authorities executed search warrants in Tauranga, Mt Maunganui and residential addresses in Auckland on November 1 related to the shipment, which culminated in arrests of four foreign nationals. The arrested people are believed to be in no relation to the ship’s crew members.The Maersk Antares, which is deployed on Maersk Line’s AC3/Triple Star service, linking Latin America, New Zealand and Asia, departed the Port of Tauranga “as per the schedule with no delay to the service,” the spokesperson said.“Maersk is fully committed to abiding by the local laws of every jurisdiction we operate in. As such Maersk Line is cooperating fully with the New Zealand authorities,” Maersk Line informed.Assistant Commissioner Chambers said that this is the largest single seizure of cocaine in New Zealand, and that the shipment was destined for New Zealand.last_img read more

Industry Ideas for a Newsstand Plan B

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first_imgEvery now and then a blog post I do gets people talking. That’s always fun, and the ideas that bubble up are often fresh and useful. Irwin Krimke, whose work with Backwoodsman magazine has been very successful, contacted me to say that I neglected, in my reporting of a recent conversation with him, to give appropriate credit to the wholesalers with whom he’s been partnering, and especially to Kable News Company, which has worked to grow his client publication over 600 percent since they took it over. Hats off to everyone involved in this great success story!See Also: The Newsstand Is Not All “Doom and Gloom” From a reader responding to the notion that the conversation has become too negative: Does anyone seriously believe that retailers do not notice how their sales are down? Please. What would be really strange is if we as an industry didn’t address these issues.Ideas and suggestions have also been pouring in about Plan B. Many have to do with eliminating one layer from the distribution process—either the national distributor or the national wholesaler network. Suggestions center around setting up direct-style distribution, drop-shipping from distribution hubs, and eliminating merchandising or doing it on a fee-for-service basis. Here is a sampling:• From a former direct distributor: “Based on the free market system, if this system collapses another will arise to take its place. Currently I am working with India-based businesses on outsourcing solutions for data analysis that might prove useful to publishers and distributors.”• From a newsstand consultant: “Wholesalers are clear they cannot stay in business without more money; publishers are clear they cannot provide more money. If we don’t listen we are perpetuating a vicious cycle. What if the printers were to develop tie lines for the pick and pack and drop ship direct to retailers? Wholesalers could reduce their business to merchandising on a fee-for-service basis; national distributors can bill and collect the retailers on behalf of the publishers. It takes a step and several costs out of the process.”• From a group publisher: “Set up the tie lines/distribution hubs at the Clark (or other trucker) warehouses and ship direct from there. Retailers take back merchandising responsibility.” • From an independent publisher: “Work with the major retailers to truck to their distribution centers and ship from there.” • From a national distributor executive: “Use a system already in place to swing to direct distribution.”  Are any of these plans strong candidates for Plan B? What do you think?last_img read more

New York and The New Yorker Dominate Ellie Awards Once Again

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first_imgNEW YORK—Despite honoring an industry in never-ending flux, much about the 2018 National Magazine Awards (or the Ellies, named for the accompanying elephant-shaped trophy) remained consistent with well-established tradition.Wine and cocktails flowed liberally, a TV news anchor reaffirmed the importance of journalism amid trying times (in between quips about the presence of Anna Wintour and Joanna Coles), and Adam Moss and David Remnick—editors of New York magazine and The New Yorker, respectively—wore thin the Cipriani ballroom’s carpeting during repeated trips to the stage to collect honors on behalf of their publications.What was glaringly different about this year’s 53rd annual Ellies was the omission of its most prestigious award: Magazine of the Year. The American Society of Magazine Editors, which administers the awards, indicated that the move was a reflection of the fact the Ellies are no longer confined to honoring print magazines alone. Replacing Magazine of the Year are two new categories: one for social media and one for digital innovation. “Now that every category is open to digital content, ASME believes that the goal of the Ellies—to recognize editorial excellence in a wide range of publications—is better served by focusing attention on the finalists and winners in the four General Excellence categories,” said ASME in a statement announcing the change.“It’s a bit like the Oscars deciding to stop giving out an award for Best Picture,” opined one publisher in attendance.What remains constant, however, is the Ellies’ commitment to honoring truly inspiring work from some of the best and brightest in the industry—not just in news and general interest reporting, but in sports, food, personal service, entertainment, lifestyle, criticism, fiction, design, and photography.The big winners this year, like in so many previous years (and not undeservedly so), were New York, which took home three wins among ten nominations, and The New Yorker, which also won three awards, among eight nominations.Apart from Moss and Remnick, the guest of honor was Metropolitan Home, Saveur, and Garden Design founding editor Dorothy Kalins, who joins the likes of Tina Brown, Graydon Carter, Hugh Hefner, and Gloria Steinem in the now 29-member Magazine Editors’ Hall of Fame.The four General Excellence winners, which, according to ASME, are now the most prestigious honors, were Aperture (for Literature, Science, and Politics), San Francisco magazine (Special Interest), T: The New York Times Style Magazine (Service and Lifestyle), and The New Yorker (News, Sports, and Entertainment).After Outside editor and ASME president Chris Keyes honored the previously announced winner of the ASME Award for Fiction (Zoetrope: All-Story‘s second consecutive win) and the five honorees of the ASME Next Awards, honoring magazine journalists under 30, “CNN Tonight” anchor Don Lemon took to the stage to begin the proceedings in earnest.“It’s been a tough year for all of us,” Lemon quipped. “I was 25 when it all started.”The first winner, in the Public Interest category, was The New Yorker, for Ronan Farrow’s reporting, which helped to break open the Harvey Weinstein scandal. It was The New Yorker‘s eighth win all-time in the category.Cosmopolitan then scored a repeat victory in the Personal Service category for its October story, “How to Run for Office,” followed by W, which earned its fourth Ellie award for photography.W editor Stefano Tonchi, accepting the award, said that the magazine tried to get celebrities to do something different and special in their portraits, “like a man kissing a man or a woman kissing a woman.”“Men kissing men and women kissing women,” replied Lemon, returning to the podium. “I’m here for all of it.”After Aperture won for General Excellence: Literature, Science and Politics, Texas Monthly earned the Ellie for Leisure Interests, for its July feature, “The Golden Age of BBQ.” Accepting the award was Tim Taliaferro, who stepped aside as EIC of the magazine just two weeks ago amid some controversy.Honored in the Single-Topic Issue category was National Geographic, which famously stepped outside of its yellow box for the January issue titled “Gender Revolution.”“I have never, in 38 years of journalism, had a reaction the way we did after we put a nine-year-old transgender girl on the cover,” said editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg, adding that readers credited the issue with enabling conversations they couldn’t have had before.After wins by New York and Time/Mic in the Columns/Commentary and Video categories, respectively, Alex Tizon earned a posthumous Ellie Award for Essays and Criticism for his viral June 2017 story in The Atlantic, “My Family’s Slave.”Next, Self, which shuttered its print edition at the end of 2016, earned the first-ever Ellie for Social Media.“This was a really huge pivot and change for us,” said editor-in-chief Carolyn Kylstra, accepting the award. “I’m so proud of the team and what we accomplished. When you no longer have that flagship property, everything else has to become the flagship property.”New York had two separate sections nominated in the Magazine Section category, which was won by its trendspotting section, “The Strategist.”The other first-time category, Digital Innovation, went to SB Nation, for its July feature about what football will look like in the future—which the category’s judges affectionately deemed “an online acid trip.”“Holy shit,” remarked editor Elena Bergeron.Among other winners and nominees of note, TMC Pulse—the monthly magazine serving Texas Medical Center—earned a surprise nomination in the Feature Writing category (GQ won). And despite losing out to T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Bon Appétit earned an eighth consecutive nomination in the General Excellence: Service and Lifestyle category.View the full list of Ellie Award winners here.2018 Ellie Awards Finalists (Winners in Bold)General ExcellenceNews, Sports and EntertainmentThe New Yorker; The Atlantic; The California Sunday Magazine; National Geographic; New YorkService and LifestyleT: The New York Times Style Magazine; Bon Appétit; Eater; Saveur; Teen VogueSpecial InterestSan Francisco; Bicycling; Inc.; Outside; Texas MonthlyLiterature, Science and Politics Aperture; The Marshall Project; Oxford American; Popular Science; Virginia Quarterly ReviewPublic InterestThe New Yorker for “Abuses of Power,” October 23 print issue, “Weighing the Costs of Speaking Out About Harvey Weinstein,” October 27 at newyorker.com, and “Harvey Weinstein’s Army of Spies,” November 6 at newyorker.com, by Ronan FarrowHarper’s Magazine for “Where Health Care Won’t Go,” by Helen Ouyang, JuneThe New Yorker for “The Takeover,” by Rachel Aviv, October 9ProPublica and NPR for “The Last Person You’d Expect to Die in Childbirth,” by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR, May 12, “Lost Mothers,” by Nina Martin, Emma Cillekens and Alessandra Freitas, July 17, and “Nothing Protects Black Women From Dying in Pregnancy and Childbirth,” by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR, December 7, at propublica.orgVanity Fair for “The 5th Risk,” September, and “Made in the U.S.D.A.,” December, by Michael LewisPersonal ServiceCosmopolitan for “How to Run for Office,” reporting by Laura Brounstein, Meredith Bryan, Jessica Goodman, Emily C. Johnson, Tess Koman, Rachel Mosely, Rebecca Nelson and Helen Zook, October 10 at cosmopolitan.com and November print issueConsumer Reports for “Too Many Meds? America’s Love Affair With Prescription Medication,” by Teresa Carr, August 3 at consumerreports.orgGrist for “Ask Umbra’s 21-Day Apathy Detox,” by Umbra Fisk, April 17 at grist.orgSeventeen for “This Is a Story About Suicide,” by Andrea Stanley, November/DecemberWomen’s Health for the article “Wakey Wakey!” by Malia Jacobson, December print issue; “Sleep Center,” December 11 on womenshealthmag.com; and the video “Wakey Wakey!,” December 11 on facebook.com/womenshealthmagazinePhotographyW; GQ Style; National Geographic; New York; Virginia Quarterly ReviewDesignGQ; Bon Appétit; ESPN The Magazine; Men’s Health; WiredLeisure Interests5280 for “The 5280 Guide to Four Corners,” by Kasey Cordell, SeptemberBicycling for “How Cycling Works,” OctoberBon Appétit for “A Simple Roast Chicken,” by Amiel Stanek, OctoberNew York for “The Encyclopedia of Vegan Food,” by Robin Raisfeld and Rob Patronite, November 13-26Texas Monthly for “The Golden Age of BBQ,” by Daniel Vaughn, JuneSingle-Topic IssueNational Geographic for “Gender Revolution,” JanuaryThe California Sunday Magazine for “A Teenage Life,” December 3Columbia Journalism Review for “The Trump Issue,” FallNew York for “My New York,” October 16-29The New York Times Magazine for “The New York Issue,” June 4Feature PhotographyThe New Yorker for “Faces of an Epidemic,” photographs by Philip Montgomery, October 30 at newyorker.comThe New Republic for “Charlottesville’s Faces of Hate,” photographs by Mark Peterson, August 14 at newrepublic.comNew York for “The 43-Day Fashion Shoot,” photographs by Holly Andres, August 20 at thecut.comTIME for “Death Reigns on the Streets of Duterte’s Philippines,” photographs by James Nachtwey, January 16Vogue for “American Women,” photographs by Lynsey Addario, Evgenia Arbugaeva, Daniel Arnold, Jonas Bendiksen, Cass Bird, Charlie Engman, Alex Majoli, Bella Newman, Jackie Nickerson, Benjamin Rasmussen, Stefan Ruiz, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Lorna Simpson, Deanna and Ed Templeton and Mayan Toledano, March 8 at vogue.comMagazine SectionNew York for “The Strategist”Backpacker for “The Play List”Bon Appétit for “Starters”Martha Stewart Weddings for “Planner”New York for “The Culture Pages”Website New York; The Marshall Project; National Geographic; Pitchfork; VogueSocial MediaSELF; Mother Jones; The New Yorker; Seventeen; TIMEVideoTIME and Mic for “Life After Addiction,” video by Aja Harris and Paul Moakley, November 8 at time.comThe Atlantic for “What Will Happen to Undocumented Doctors?,” video by Jeremy Raff, February 2The New Yorker for “A Fever Dream at Beautycon,” video by Tim Hussin, September 18The Outline for “The Republican Who Quit the Party Because of Trump,” March 22Vogue for “We Are All Fabulous . . . ,” video by Oliver Hadlee Pearch, February 24; “Paris, Je T’aime,” video by Gordon von Steiner, July 20; and “Workin’ 9 to 5 . . . Inside the Vogue Office!,” video by Charlotte Wales, September 25Digital InnovationSB Nation for “17776: An American Football Story,” by Jon Bois, July 5HuffPost Highline for “FML,” by Michael Hobbes, December 14The Marshall Project With Condé Nast Entertainment and Participant Media for “We Are Witnesses,” by Jenny Carchman, October 26 at themarshallproject.orgNational Geographic Traveler for “North: An Illustrated Travelogue,” by Christoph Niemann, April 4TIME for “Finding Home: 3 Babies, 3 Families, 1 Year,” photographs by Lynsey Addario, reporting by Aryn Baker,  video by Francesca Trianni, December 18ReportingThe New York Times Magazine for “The Uncounted,” by Azmat Khan and Anand Gopal, November 19The California Sunday Magazine with the Investigative Fund for “Below Deck,” by Lizzie Presser, February 5ESPN The Magazine for “Sin City or Bust,” April 24, “Standing Down,” November 13, and “Roger Goodell Has a Jerry Jones Problem,” December 4, by Don Van Natta Jr. and Seth WickershamHarper’s Magazine with the Investigative Fund for “Ghost Nation,” by Nick Turse, JulyNational Geographic and ProPublica for “How the U.S. Triggered a Massacre in Mexico,” by Ginger Thompson, June 12 at propublica.orgThe New York Times Magazine With ProPublica for “Kushnerville,” by Alec MacGillis, May 28The New Yorker for “On the Brink,” by Evan Osnos, September 18Feature WritingGQ for “A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, SeptemberThe Atlantic for “My President Was Black,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, January/FebruaryThe Atlantic for “A Death at Penn State,” by Caitlin Flanagan, NovemberThe New York Times Magazine for “The Mailroom,” by Jeanne Marie Laskas, January 22TMC Pulse for “Alan Dickson’s Final Days,” by Alexandra Becker, JulyVirginia Quarterly Review for “The Useful Village,” by Ben Mauk, SpringWired With Epic Magazine for “Love in the Time of Robots,” by Alex Mar, NovemberEssays and CriticismThe Atlantic for “Lola’s Story,” by Alex Tizon, JuneElle for “Her Eyes Were Watching the Stars,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, JuneNew York for “The Uninhabitable Earth,” by David Wallace-Wells, July 10-23The New Yorker for “Losing Streak,” by Kathryn Schulz, February 13 and 20Smithsonian for “What Ever Happened to the Russian Revolution?” by Ian Frazier, OctoberColumns and CommentaryNew York for three columns by Rebecca Traister: “Why the Harvey Weinstein Sexual-Harassment Allegations Didn’t Come Out Until Now,” October 5, “Your Reckoning. And Mine.,” November 12, and “This Moment Isn’t (Just) About Sex. It’s Really About Work,” December 10, at thecut.comBuzzFeed News for three columns by Bim Adewunmi: “How the Oscar Flub Demonstrates the Limits of Black Graciousness,” March 1, “How Oprah Got Her Acting Groove Back,” April 10, and “Maria Sharapova’s Rivalry With Serena Williams Is in Her Head,” September 9ESPN The Magazine for three columns by Howard Bryant: “The Williams Movement,” February 27, “Power Play,” April 24, and “How Is This Still a Debate?” December 4Longreads for three columns by Laurie Penny: “The Horizon of Desire” October 10, “We’re All Mad Here: Weinstein, Women, and the Language of Lunacy,” October 23, and “The Unforgiving Minute,” November 7Pitchfork for three columns by Jayson Greene: “Is Rihanna the Most Influential Pop Singer of the Past Decade?” April 5, “Can Music Heal Trauma? Exploring the Therapeutic Powers of Sound,” September 20, and “Do Androids Dream of Electric Guitars? Exploring the Future of Musical A.I.,” June 12last_img read more