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3 Things I Learned from Coach Alvarez

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first_imgSaturday night I had the opportunity watch the Wisconsin – LSU game from Athletic Director (and former head coach) Barry Alvarez’s box. I had to chance to ask Coach Alvarez about football, about leadership, and about success.1. You Have to Make the CallI told Coach Alvarez that at Ohio State an 11-1 season results in people calling for you to be fired (actually, losing to Michigan means calls for you to be shot, then hung, then drawn and quartered, then burned, and then having your limbs cut off and buried in the four corners of the state).Coach Alvarez said, “You run about 75 plays in a football game. That’s 150 total. There are 70,000 people here, all of whom know how to your job better than you do. If you run, you should have passed. If you pass and it’s incomplete, you should have run. If you blitz, you should have been in zone. If you’re in zone, you should have blitzed.”You have to make the call. You have to play your game. Ignore the Monday Morning Quarterbacks, and those that don’t play the game or who never have.2. The Key to Success Is ConsistencyI sent this one to my newsletter subscribers this morning. I asked the coach to share with me what he believed the key to success was for student athletes. He thought about it for a minute, and then he said one word: “Consistency.” I said, “Self-discipline?” He said, “That’s part of it. But it’s performing every time.”Consistency is a great attribute. It’s not the ability to generate a great performance once, or even make the big play. It’s the ability to consistently produce results that leads to success. That’s a complicated idea. It’s part discipline, part mental state, part effort, part resourcefulness, part initiative, and part determination.3. Just Get Four YardsPassing plays weren’t working. Coach Alvarez wasn’t known for running a passing game offense. He was known for running the ball straight at you and pounding you down, betting his big guys could wear down your big guys. He won a bunch of games that way, including three Rose Bowls.He told me he wanted four yards. Three yards a play doesn’t get you enough for a first down over three plays. But four yards gets you the first down. I like that kind of smash mouth football, and I like the lesson.Sometimes the best way to produce results is to grind it out. Dig in, push hard, and gain a little bit of ground. Then, refusing to give up what you’ve taken, push forward and do it again. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Don’t Obsess Over Politics

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first_imgI once had a great mentor tell me that I invested too much of my time and my emotional energy in politics. It was during law school, and everything then was political. At least it was for me. Politics was all-consuming.My mentor told me to stop focusing on politics and start focusing on the difference that I wanted to make in the world. And he told me to focus on taking care of my family and giving them the life that I wanted for them. He said that I would have a bigger impact if I detached from politics.I took his advice. I like to observe politics, but I am not emotionally invested.Your Government Won’t Make You HappyThere are a lot of politicians competing for your attention—and your money—right now. They want you to support them and help them become President of the United States. All of these politicians talk a lot about how they are going to help you, and it all sounds pretty good.You might even believe you will be happier if the candidate you support is elected. But you won’t be any happier or any more successful after this interminable election cycle.Your Physiological NeedsThe government isn’t going to make sure that your physiological needs are met. The government, try as it may, isn’t going to give you shelter, with food, or with health care. It may provide a social safety net in each of these areas, but if you are counting on government to take care of you, you will always have to fear not having your very basic physiological needs met.Do you know anyone who is receiving the government’s help in these areas of whom you are jealous? Is there anyone you know who receives help with whom you would trade places?Your Safety NeedsYour government isn’t going to keep you safe either. It can’t protect you from violence, even though it does its very best to keep the most violent people from harming others by locking them up. It also does a poor job protecting you from people who are violent because they are mentally ill.The police aren’t normally around when a crime is being committed, even though they’d love to be there to prevent you from being harmed.Your government does the best it can with big threats, but can’t help with most of the personal threats to your physical safety.Your Need for LoveNo government is going to meet your need for love, friendship, or companionship. The need for love is just as important as the physiological needs. As far as I know, no government has ever even been designed to address these very fundamental human needs.Do you know anyone who has had their need for love and companionship as a result of government action? The best the government can do is prevent your rights here from being infringed.Your Desire for SuccessYour government isn’t going to provide you with happiness. It isn’t going to make sure you reach your full potential, and it isn’t going to ensure that your dreams come true or that you reach your goals. Your government isn’t going to participate in your success. This is true no matter who is elected.Do you know anyone who owes their success to their government alone? There are people who are successful in politics, and they go on to make a lot of money when they leave, but no government action creates individual success outside of politics.At its very best, your government is going to create an environment in which you can “pursue happiness.” But you are going to have to hustle, and you are going to have to do the pursuing. This is where you should focus. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

Winning a Deal is the Outcome, Not Something You Do

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first_imgIt is sometimes difficult to think of winning a deal as an outcome. It isn’t something that you do; it’s the natural result of everything leading up to your dream client’s decision to buy from you. Much of the time, when we talk about winning deals, we don’t acknowledge the inputs that create the output (a useful concept for thinking about your results, including won deals). So what are the inputs that create the natural output of a won deal? What created a preference to buy from you? Winning a deal is the outcome, not something you do.Outputs that Lead to a DealCertain things tend to be true when you win deals. Very few of them occur late in the sales conversation, and almost none happen when you ask your dream client to sign a contract so you can begin to execute for them. Most of them show up very early in the process and build a preference to work with you.The Belief You Understand ThemAs much as we want people to understand who we are, what we do, and why we do it the way that we do, prospects seem to find more value in making sure we know who they are, what they do, what they want, and why they want it that way. My friend, Charlie Green, wrote a book titled Trust-Based Selling and an accompanying field book, both of which are mandatory reading. Charlie has an equation for trust: Credibility x Reliability x Intimacy / Self-Orientation. He will tell you of all the factors that intimacy is the strongest. It answers the questions, “Do you know me?” and “Do you care?”The time you spend listening and taking notes might be a good indicator as to whether or not you are generating this outcome. Your ability to share that you understand what they need to be able to make something work in their company is also going to help with this output.If your actions show that you are not interested in the people with whom you are meeting or what they want, you can be confident that you are not creating the outcomes you need. When you only talk about you, your company, and your solution, you project that you care more about selling your solution than helping them with the better results they need.The Belief You Are RightThe contacts within your dream client account need to believe that you are right. They need to believe that you are right about the root cause of their problem, the implication of those problems, and your recommendation as to what they need to do about it. They also need to believe that how you are going to solve is not only right but that it is right for them.If you are not right about the root cause of their problem or challenge (or opportunity), you make it challenging to believe your recommendation. In one of my businesses, I have had clients resist the truth about why they were not getting the results they needed, only accepting my analysis (and my recommendations) after they were harmed by ignoring the facts. The framework you find in Eat Their Lunch was organic, growing out of my need to be a better teacher and educator. You win when your dream client believes you are right about their problems and the solution.Your recommendation not only has to be believed as being right, but it also has to pass the test of being right for your dream client. If you aren’t collaborating and building consensus with the stakeholders you want to work with you in the future, you make it difficult for them by not including their input, their preferences, and resolving their concerns.The Belief You Will Execute for ThemNo one wants to buy from someone they believe is not going to execute for them. They don’t want to be embarrassed by a bad decision, and they don’t want you to strand them with a solution that doesn’t work, and one where they are not going to get the necessary support.The output here is the result of you creating the confidence you and your team will execute the solution you sell, that you understand their concerns, and that they can count on you. They need to believe you and your team are going to think they’re important enough to command your time, attention, and help in improving their results.Any doubt about your willingness or ability to execute reduces the likelihood of you winning their business—even if they believe you understand them and believe you are right.Inputs Create OutputsThere are inputs here worth some discussion. How do you create the outputs above?Your ApproachYour overall approach to selling is a factor in creating the outcomes above. If your approach is transactional (a word I am using to describe a set of behaviors, not a type of sale), you won’t likely score well on understanding your dream client. The time you spend trying to leverage your company’s reputation and solutions early prevents you from keeping your understanding of your client.When your approach precludes your effectively diagnosing your dream client’s challenges because you lack the business acumen, situational knowledge, or a general theory as to why they are struggling with some set of problems, you make it challenging to accept your recommendations as being right, let alone right for them.The more consultative your approach, the better your chances of creating the outcomes that build a preference to work with you.Your CommunicationHow you communicate matters as much as what you communicate (you should join Toastmasters, not because you want to a speaker, but because you want to communicate effectively). It helps to be conversational, and it is of extraordinary value to ask outstanding questions and to listen intently. When you are not taking notes, you are communicating that what your dream client says is of no import to you.It’s also incredibly crucial that you know your subject matter cold. You don’t need to sound like you know what you are talking about; you have to know what you are talking about (this is the credibility you see in Charlie Green’s equation above).Your ProcessIf there were a single area I would recommend you to spend time improving, it would be your process, more explicitly selling the process to your dream client. If you want to give yourself the best chance at winning, you want to ensure you have the necessary meetings and conversations that lead to that result. (See The Lost Art of Closing) No more pushy sales tactics. The Lost Art of Closing shows you how to proactively lead your customer and close your sales. The more complex the sale (read as “low-frequency decision” with “high significance” for the client), the more important is that you have time to prove you understand your client, that you are right about the root cause of their problems and the solution, and that you are going to execute. Attempts to shorten the time it takes to do this tends to not only reduce your chances of winning but also slows things down.In every interaction you have with your contacts, you are providing them an experience as to what you and your company are going to be like to work with in the future, should they choose you.You Win Early and Sign LaterYou win deals early in the process. The more you focus on your competency in managing the end-to-end experience of the sales conversation, the better you will do in creating a preference to buy from you. You win early, and you sign later. If you want to win, work on creating the outcomes that allow you to win early. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Questions about the Level 4 Value Creation Approach to Sales

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first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 46:18 — 37.2MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSAnthony:  All right. So here we are, in the arena, different kind of in the arena, now not interviewing a guest but being interviewed by Beth, who’s going to ask me some questions that we get frequently about Eat Their Lunch and Level Four Value Creation and my general approach to sales, which is different and does cause people to question what I’m saying and what we think they should be doing. So, let’s go ahead and get started talking about some of the questions and how we can help people think about this so that they can sell in a what I would call, the 21st century way of selling. It’s a new time and the evolution of sales means that things just keep getting trickier, so you got to keep pace here.Beth:  Yeah, it’s really true. We get a lot of questions. The one I think you get a lot is about your approach you recommended at Eat Their Lunch. We talk a lot about the creating value and the four levels, so maybe the best place to start just everyone has context is what are the four levels of value and really why should people even care about this idea?Win customers away from your competition. Check out Eat Their LunchAnthony: Well, they should care because I wrote it in a book but, no, the thing about the four levels that was interesting to me as I was trying to find some way to explain to people how you approach sales tends to fall into one of four categories. And some people who over index on results, they just produce better results, they tend to start from one side of the conversation and somebody else starts from the other side. So the four levels generally fall into categories like this. Level one means, I’m an account on my company’s history and my product. That’s what’s going to do the selling for me. I’m not the value proposition, I’m not the value creator, you’ve got to trust that my good company that’s been around for all these years is what’s going to create value for you and our products and services are going to create value for you and look at this proof.Anthony: I can even show you logos and big companies just like yours. And level one ultimately means you’re going to be perceived as a commodity because of it’s just the product and there’s nothing more to it. Then I’m going to look for price because there’s nothing else to look at and evaluate. Level two means you have a good experience, which means great support, great service. You sold me your product and you also gave me a whole bunch of problems when I have that and I need somebody to help me with that, and I may even have a contract to have certain support, and it’s a level up from level one. So you’re at level two, but level two includes level one. So you can’t be like, “We’re really good at support but our product’s still terrible and it won’t work for you.” You need both of those together to get to level two.Anthony: Level three is where we’ve been commoditized for, I’m going to say probably 30 years. So I can create a tangible result for you and my competitors can. And I have an ROI calculator and you have an ROI calculator and we both can turn it into a spreadsheet. And what I would call level three now is reactives. You tell me you have a problem, I’ll solve it for you. That’s different. It’s not like level four at all because you’re assuming that I can go in and say, “What’s keeping you up at night?” And get your dissatisfaction and solve that for you. But everybody does that. So now that level of value, even though it’s the third highest level of value that we can see right now, is still commoditized. So it’s still not enough for you to be differentiated. Not Easily anyway.Anthony: Level four is strategic and it means that you’re going to enter into a conversation about what’s the strategic outcome. And I love this quote from Theodore Levitt from Harvard Business School. He was a marketing professor there and he said, “People don’t buy drills, they buy holes. And if we could have the hole without having to buy your drill, they’d be happy not to buy the drill. They’d be happy not to know that it’s yellow. They’d be happy not to have to buy drill bits and all these other things. They just want the hole.”Anthony: And I think for most of us when we come in, we’re in enamored with our product or our service and we want to talk about those things because we’re hyped up about it and we know that we can make a difference for people. But level four is actually the place right now where you can find the differentiation as a salesperson and you don’t have to rely on all of the earlier levels of value. even though you’re going to get to them at some point. So those are the four levels of value and what we know and what we can see is that when people come in and they’re super strategic, they’re leading with insight, they’ve got advice, they’re consultative, they tend to produce better results than people that come in at level one and identify themselves as a commodity.Beth: Well, and it’s interesting because you teased my next question here a bit, which is when you lay out the four levels, that makes complete sense. But people are really concerned about this approach and I’m curious as to what you see, why they’re concerned and what that all means.Anthony:  Well, their concerns come from a couple things. So when you start talking about having business acumen and understanding what I call the super trends, and the reason I call them super trends and not just trends is because you’re looking for things that are going to impact your client’s business, that are broad enough to have significant implications for them. So if you think about a couple of examples, so think about the taxi industry when Uber launches. And they’re not concerned, they don’t think anything of it because the taxi industry has worked that way for a long time, but the trend there is, there are unused resources that haven’t been organized. There’s black cars all over the place in major cities that don’t have enough work, and with an app where somebody can go on and organize those black cars and get them to the people that they need them, is an existential threat to the taxi industry.Anthony:  And in New York it is right now. It’s very hard to sell a medallion in New York city because they’re not worth very much anymore, and that’s the kind of thing. So what is the trend? When the smartphone came out, it didn’t look like an existential threat to anybody, but it ends up being an existential threat to a whole bunch of people. And these trends that we look for, we’re looking for things that are going to cause your clients or your perspective clients to have to change something in the next, let’s call it 18 to 24 months. So people are concerned, well what about these trends? Doesn’t my customer already know what all these trends are? Aren’t they already aware of all these things? Aren’t they already doing something about them? So they’re concerned about that.Anthony: They’re also concerned about the idea of just being consultative. And they don’t frame it that way when they say it to me, but they’re concerned about being consultative and they say things like, “Well, you would have to be a Bain consultant or from McKinsey or something to be able to talk about these trends.” And the truth of the matter is you wouldn’t. You’d have to have access to a computer and Google to go out and find the trends and read about them, and then decide which ones make sense in your client’s world. Which ones are going to have the biggest impact on their business over let’s just say 24 months? And then what can you do to help them? So you’re not concerned just about super trends, the things that are big like, in Eat Their Lunch, I talked about 11,000 baby boomers retiring every day. And people are stunned by that number, but that’s what the number is.Anthony: So 4.3 million people retire every day because they’ve decided to leave the workforce in their late 60s or 70s, which means you need 358,000 new jobs just to be able to backfill the baby boomers. And we’re creating 220,000 jobs a month, so there’s still a giant gap being opened up. But if somebody cares about talent, then that’s a trend that might be impactful for them. Their concern is really are we overstepping our boundaries? Are we out of our depth? Do we have the right to come in and share these ideas? And the answer is yes. Even though I know it’s scary for people if they haven’t been taught or trained or explained how to do these things.Beth: Yeah. And I think too what you bring up is very interesting in the fact that there are things like trends you can find from Google when you can do your research, but we’re also filled with incredible insights that our clients would really find valuable that we don’t even recognize. We’re going to address that in a little bit. Another thing that I think is really helpful for people to understand when it comes to this framework, you talk a lot about entering from the right instead of the left. You want to help explain what you mean by that?Anthony: I thought you were going to stop with just you talk a lot.Beth: Well, sometimes.Anthony:  That would have been a true statement too. Yeah, so the thing about where you are and where you start, if you start, “Well, let me introduce myself and my company and let me try to provide proof that I belong in this conversation that’s outside of what I bring to the conversation,” then that we call starting from the left. You’re starting at level one and you want to be strategic and you want to be a trusted advisor, but you’ve already identified yourself as something less than that. And once you start opening up a conversation about things that aren’t really interesting to your client, then that’s who you are to them and you get a limited amount of time.Anthony: I’ve written about this on the blog. The gift of time from your client is a magnificent gift that you should absolutely appreciate enough to do your homework and to come in with something relevant to say. And what we call that approach is we call it coming in from the right, which means you’re coming in from level four and you’re working backwards to three, two, one, instead of starting at one and trying to get to four. So you come in and you start talking about these are the things that we’re observing happening in the market right now. These are the things that we think are going to be implications for companies and people that don’t change. These are our recommendations based on our views and values as to where this market’s going, and we’re right on the intersection, but we’re right on the line between what we do and our client’s business.Anthony: So we’re right they’re saying, “These are our recommendations.” And if you’re thoughtful about this and you just reflect, you tend to know what your clients need to do before they need to do it. And that’s where you become a trusted advisor. So there’s no reason in my mind to hold that till later in the conversation. You start with what’s most important than what’s most relevant, because you’re supposed to be consultative, you’re supposed to be coming in and advising, you’re supposed to be giving your client the best recommendation to get the result that they want, and if you’re not doing that, then I would argue that you’re irrelevant. You’re not useful to me because the conversation that we’re having isn’t about what I really want and what I need to get done.Beth: Yeah, and it’s interesting because when you lay this framework out, and you’re talking with a client and it’s very easy to say like, “Okay, here’s my level one. It’s my product and two is my experience, and three is return on investment, and four is that creating… being insight driven, creating value.” I always have that aha moment when I’m chatting with someone where they go, “Wow, we’re really just playing at level one or two” and then the wheels start turning. It’s, “How do I get to level four?” So, as you look at the framework that you laid out in Eat Their Lunch, how do you take this idea and then make it very practical and tactical? What does that look like?Anthony: You know what? That wasn’t an easy thing to do. It was harder than I thought when I started writing the book, and what I’ve found is that you have to break things into their component parts to make them digestible. So if you’re going to approach selling this way, you start with the super trends and you just look to say, “What’s going on in the world?” And once you capture the trends, you’ve got some idea about what that impact is going to be for your clients. So you start looking at what are the facts? What are the things that I can see that prove that this is true and that it’s going to have an impact? And I think that most people don’t do the work to look at that and say, “Okay, so I’ve got this trend, I’ve got facts, I’ve got proof that it’s going to impact their business. And then what’s the implication?” What’s the implication?Anthony: If there’s no implication, I heard a sales person say to me, “One of the interesting trends in my world right now is that all these billionaires like Musk and Bezos and Branson are now trying to go to outer space.” Okay, great, but what impact does that have on your client? And this particular person said, “Listen, my client advertises in the biggest places they can and they would love to have their logo on the side of a Musk or a Branson spaceship.” And I said, “If you can tie that implication like who gets to go first there, then maybe it makes sense. But what you’re looking for is something that’s going to give them either an opportunity or it’s going to cause them some sort of problem or some sort of challenge. You’re looking for things that are going to compel people to take action.”Anthony: And then you have to think about a couple other things. What are your views and your values? What do you believe is good and right and true? Where do you think their market’s going or your intersection between your market and their business? And then what is your recommendation based on what you believe to be good and right and true? And I think that’s part of what concerns people when they see a framework like this is, “Wait, we have to have an opinion about this?” Yeah, you have to have an opinion because you’re the one that’s coming in to give your best counsel to your client. It’s not enough for them to tell you what they want because you’re supposed to be the expert in what you do, and you’re supposed to be serving them by creating value and teaching them how to think about it.Anthony:  If you’re waiting for your client to say something to you about this is what we think we want, that’s a level three approach and just about anybody could take that call, and my guess is if that’s your strategy, you’re going to be subject to a lot of RFPs. We already defined our problem, we’ve already decided what we want, you just fill this out and say yes to everything that’s in the RFP, and if we find that your price is the lowest, we’ll probably hire you. Not a great strategy.Beth:   No, it’s not. And I… as you were talking there, what I started thinking about was, it’s like when you go buy a house. When you buy a house, you’re very much looking at the aesthetics and whether it is your real estate agent or it is the person who comes in you expect. What you really need to be focused on are the big items. The roof, the furnace, the air conditioner, because your aesthetics are what… that’s an emotional buy. We don’t really want to care about the real meat of the house, and that’s really what you’re talking about. Talking about these sales reps and leaders, having those insights that can prevent them from not being able to create the future that they want. Correct?Anthony: Right. That’s right. Yeah. You’re absolutely trying to help them create the future that they want or maybe one that they can’t even see yet until you show up and you start explaining to them where the market is and what’s going on and how they should be responding.Beth:  Yeah. Well, and it’s interesting because we’re kind of on the same path here as we’re talking about, you have this belief about concerns being real to the prospect who has them. You also have this idea that sales reps often fear the wrong danger. So, I’m curious to what you would say about what fears do prospects concerns reveal, and then what do you think sales rep should be afraid of?Anthony: It’s interesting because I think if you just even start with the very first interaction from a sales person, let’s say they’re making a cold call. And they call and say something like, “I’d love to stop by introduce myself, tell you about my company and learn a little bit about you. Which works better? Wednesday at 11:00 or Thursday at 2:00?” So we give them the alternative of choice, close from 1974 or something like that. I don’t even know how old that is. It’s pretty old. And the fear for the client is you’re going to waste my time. So the concern is you’re going to waste my time. So that’s what prospects are afraid of, but they don’t say it that way. They say something like, “Could you mail me some information?” Or they say something like, “We’re really busy right now. We’re not interested in changing.” Anything to get out of that call specifically because they didn’t hear any trade of value.Anthony: So their concerns tend to be around that at the early stages, and then later on it’s very scary to change. So the devil I know, I can’t get the result I want right now, but I’ve figured out all the work around, skied my business running, and now you’re coming in and telling me I have to do something different. Well, now I have to step into the unknown. So now I’m concerned, is my team going to go along with me? Are we actually going to be able to execute? Are you the kind of sales person that signs a contract with disappearing ink? And a disappearing ink means, as soon as I sign the contract, you disappear and I never see you again when things get rough, because you don’t want to be accountable for the result. So those tend to be their concerns.Anthony: The concerns for salespeople tend to fall into the wrong category. So when you show them a framework like Eat Their Lunch, their concern is, I’m afraid I might overstep my boundary. But their real fear should be, I’m irrelevant and I’m not interesting and I’m not bringing enough value to this person for them to be able to move forward with me. That’s really what their real fear should be. It shouldn’t be that I am overstepping a boundary and it should be that I’m not a value creator. And look, there’s a lot of salespeople, there’s a lot of people who are really good at this.Anthony: There are people who have been practicing sales this way for decades, and we know it’s what works and we know it’s what allows you to differentiate yourself. So if you’re going to fear something, fear not working hard enough to create value, not doing enough to really be a subject matter expert or what I call a 52% SME. So you’re more than half of a subject matter expert and you can talk to any stakeholder, whether it’s the CEO, CMO, or the person that actually uses your product with no fear that you’re going to be outflanked in any conversation with anybody because you’re a subject matter expert. That’s the real fear.Beth:  Well, and I think too, when you were talking a bit about, you’re talking to different levels, why don’t you also talk about how you need to address these different levels in terms of each level stakeholder has a different fear and there’s a different way to address them. It’s not like you can just identify the singular problem and say, “Okay, I’m going to give this answer across every stakeholder because it’s very different.” Why don’t you talk a little bit about how you look at those stakeholders and deal with this fear issue?Anthony: Yeah, that’s a good question. One of the things that confuses people about the four levels of value is they’re like, “I’m just going to play at level four.” Okay, good, I support you there. But you have to remember, when you go to the end user, let’s say you sell a SAS product and you’re talking to the end user who’s actually going to use your product from day to day, and you start by saying, “Let’s get into a really strategic conversation about where your company’s going to go in the next 24 months.” That person is like, “I just need the software to work.” Can you help me get the result that I need from your software?”Anthony:  They’re not concerned about the strategic vision of the company. They’re concerned about, can I execute with your product? When you get up to level two, let’s say you are a SAS company, then you start to get in ancillary stakeholders who say, “Look, you have to be easy to do business with. I need single sign on,” or something like that. “I need you to integrate with my CRM. I need you to make this easy for me.” And so level two starts to matter very much to that group. Level two tends to matter to management as well. Like, “I need you to be easy to do business with so we can work together.”Anthony: Level three tends to be for managers and leaders. Is this going to work? Is it going to be functional? Are we going to be able to execute this once you install it? And then level four tends to belong to management and leadership, which is where we going, and then how do you help us get there? So in a post I wrote, I was talking about a conversation that I had with someone who was talking about data.com and their competitors, and I started talking about the different ways that you might talk about that.Anthony: So you might say, “I have the biggest database with phone numbers and emails at the lowest price, then you’re one.” But you might also just as easily with the same products say something like, “I can help you acquire clients with the highest lifetime value faster than you’re acquiring them now.” And that’s a strategic outcome. So, who cares about the database? A lot of people have phone numbers and emails. A lot of people are easy to do business with. A lot of people can integrate with your CRM, but not many are going to show up and say, “I can help you find the highest lifetime value customers and acquire them faster than you are now.” Okay, that’s strategic.Anthony:          And that to me sounds like what I want to buy if I’m a leader. I’m not trying to buy data, I’m trying to buy faster results. So when you start talking in the language of faster results, you now look really interesting to me. You’re much different salesperson than the one that comes in and starts talking about the size of their database and the phone numbers and their emails, because we’re not trying to buy phone numbers. We’re back to, they don’t want a drill, they want a hole. So what’s the hole? The hole is acquisition of the right customers faster.Beth: Yeah. And before we leave this topic, let’s talk about one other thing here, and it goes back to the stakeholders and the things that people are afraid of. We always put things in context of current state and future state. You want to talk a little bit about that and what that means to those various stakeholders?Anthony:  Yeah. The current state, future state thing is a really important concept for people to understand, and I don’t see too many sales people or sales organizations that actually frame things that way. And the first thing about current state is, where are you now and what’s possible for you that you don’t tap? So how do we look at where you are and say, “Wait a second. This current state is untenable.” And the challenge that people have with that is unless you can put the context into that conversation. So you’re talking about the trends, you’re talking about the implications you’re talking about why they need to change and how they need to change, unless you can identify that current state in a way that says, “Look, it’s at risk, it’s untenable, you need to start changing,” then there’s not a reason for people to do anything different than what they’ve been doing up until that point.Anthony: And I think one of the challenges when people look at this framework and they say something like, “Wow, do they really care about the trends?” Well, some of them and others they don’t. But do they care about the implications of missing something and ending up not producing the results they want? Yeah, they do. And especially at the leadership level, they definitely care about that. In fact, senior leaders, the thing that they’re most afraid of is not knowing something that was available to them if they would have had a conversation about that before it happened. That’s what they’re most fearful of. I didn’t know and I didn’t act fast enough. This is why throughout all of history, there have always been trusted advisors. So if you read the Bible, if you read history books, you’re going to find out there were a bunch of kings and pharaohs that surrounded themselves with people who knew things they didn’t know, so they didn’t end up causing themselves more problems by not taking action soon enough. So that’s part of it.Anthony: And then the future state really matters. Like where do you need to go? Where do you need to go to take advantage of what’s going on right now, or to at least avoid the challenges that might harm your business? So if you’re not helping a client go from that current state to the future state, what is it that you’re working on? There’s nothing else for you to work on. That’s really where the action is, and that’s really where the conversation is.Beth:  Well, and you bring up something else, which is there’s this power of information. And for a very long time, I would say in the last 20 years, it’s really been picking up speed is that there’s information everywhere. I just Google and I find what I need to know, and I always say that there is this danger of your prospect. They only know as much as either they have read or someone has told them, which is pieces and parts. So there’s a big disparity between the buyer and seller. And talk a little bit about why that is true and not true and how we deal with that as sales reps.Anthony: Yeah. If you go to WebMD and you type in all your symptoms, you’re going to come back and find out that… in my case, I have ovarian cancer. And I go to my doctor with my own diagnosis and she says to me, “I don’t think that that’s true, but I’m happy to run some tests just to see.” And you can go and find information, but information is not the same as insight, and information is not the same as wisdom. And it’s not the same as what we call situational knowledge, which means the experience that tells you that this is good and right and true and this probably isn’t. Or this is better in this circumstance and this probably isn’t. But there’s still information disparity. And right now, if you go to LinkedIn and you read the prognosticators and pseudo experts as Mike Weinberg would call them, you’re going to find a whole bunch of people that say all the power has shifted to the buyer.Anthony: They know everything that you know, because they can read your website. Well, on my website, you probably do can’t find out everything I know because there’s 4,085 posts there. So there’s a lot of what I believe and know in that particular place, but it would take you something like 240 hours to read all those posts, and you may not want to go to the trouble to do that. For most people on their sites for their business, there’s content there, there’s certainly information there, but there’s not necessarily wisdom there, and there’s not necessarily the insights, and the trade-offs, and the situational knowledge that a salesperson has. And this is one of the fears that causes people to have a, I guess, some hesitancy in about approach like this. And here’s why they think, “Well, my client knows more than me.” And they can go out to the Internet and read all about companies like ours and they can start to decide what they want, without me having to be there.Anthony: And you’re wrong. So the truth of the matter is, your client knows more about their business then you do. And they should. They work in that business. They make decisions for that business. They may know more about their vertical than you do. They may have worked in that industry for a very long time, they might have incredible situational knowledge, but at the intersection where your business serves their business, you should know more than they know. And why is that? Because let’s take for example, somebody who buys like enterprise resource planning software. They buy that. They want to buy that one time in their life and never buy it again, because it’s like a quadruple bypass, a brain surgery, a colonoscopy and a root canal at the same time. You do not want to rip the whole guts of your business out and then have to replace that, so you don’t want to make mistakes at this.Anthony: If you bought it twice in your lives, you would still be unhappy buying it the second time. It’s just not something that you buy very frequently. And I’m using this to make an example. If I sell ERP, if that’s what I do for a living, I’ve done it hundreds of times. My company has done it thousands of times. We have a depth of experience and situational knowledge that says, “This is a better choice for you than that.” Well, how do you know that? Because we tried it 56 times this way in the past and we can’t make it work in your vertical. This is the best way we have to make it work for you and here’s what all our experience tells us is the right answer.Anthony: So they’re buying that experience that you have, that situational knowledge that it’s impossible for them to have unless they’ve actually done that role and worked in that business. So they have maybe the same experience that you have, but it’s highly unlikely. Most of the time they buy what you sell infrequently. And because it’s infrequent, they can’t possibly have the situational knowledge. So you’re leaning, not just on trends, but you’re leaning on views and values and your experience, and your ability to help them make trade-offs and make good decisions about what they’re going to do.Beth: Well, and this is what complicates purchases. Decision making. It’s where things get paralyzed. This is a great example of where an RFP goes wrong. I actually was talking with someone last week and she had told me a story about how a year ago she had gone and bought some software, thought it was the right one, come to find out the information she bought it on wasn’t quite correct, and so she’s very quietly, because the contractor is up as replacing it with something new, and she’s crossing her fingers with better insight now. So the whole idea that having that insight that you have, that you’ve learned, that your company has learned, to be able to share with your prospects is really invaluable for them because they generally don’t know it.Anthony: Yeah, that’s the truth. They generally don’t know and they’re trying to make a good decision, but when they go out on their own and they don’t get the help that they need, and they don’t have somebody really walk them through that, you end up with situations like this where they are buyer’s remorse, because they really weren’t helped by a competent salesperson that could give them the right advice as to what to buy or not to buy.Beth: Well, and the other part of it is you and I have been in this a really long time and sales is just constantly evolving. And it has changed dramatically even from 2008, which was really the catalyst from moving from transactional to having to be a lot more strategic. You write and speak about this a lot and I’m curious as to what is it really mean? And more importantly, what are the implications for sales people, sales leaders, and really we look at the whole sales organization to be able to keep up with the evolving change of sales?Anthony: Yeah, it’s a good question. My view is, on that, there’s really just two strategies that are emerging or have emerged. And one I call super transactional, which is amazon.com. You can not out transact amazon.com, or Alibaba, or one of those kinds of places where they’ve taken all the friction out of buying so much so that my kindle says I have 1400 books on there because Amazon’s algorithm is so good and there’s no friction. So they pop something up in front of me and say, “Anthony, we think you would like this book because you like these other books.” And I say, “Well, you’re right. I would like that book.” And I buy it. There’s no friction. I don’t have to go to a bookstore, and more and more things are getting dragged into that gravitational pull of how do we become super transactional? And I think when you look at Silicon Valley, everybody there, their ethos is, “Let’s just print money. We’re going to transact everything. We’re going to make everything so frictionless that you can just say yes.”Anthony: And it’s working in a lot of cases. So if you think about amazon.com that’s a good one. My children don’t really have pizza delivered, but they use DoorDash and Uber Eats and Grubhub, and they have all kinds of things delivered because there’s resources available. Somebody organized the resources to go pick things up and now everybody delivers food now. So it doesn’t matter. You don’t have to be a pizza place to deliver. Everybody delivers because you’ve got these resources being used that way. The second approach though, I would call super relational as opposed to super transactional. And this means, it’s a complex decision. You need somebody who understands how to help you make that decision. You don’t make it frequently enough and it’s significant for you.Anthony: And where that gravitational pull is dragging people is towards greater advice, greater insight, greater understanding about how to make the right recommendations and help somebody get the result that they want. And I think for a lot of people they saw, my friends, Matt Dixon and Brent Adamson published something that said, “Relationship selling is dead when the challenger sale came out.” And basically, they were using relationship in a particular way. And that was essentially, if all you think that you have is a friendship where I like you and you like me, you’re wrong. And they’re exactly correct about that.Anthony:  The way I would describe it though, super relational means, your relation is not only do I like you? Do I know you? Do I trust you? All those things don’t matter because you’re trying to create a preference to work with you, but the truth of the matter is you also have to create business value for me. And if you don’t create business value for me, then we can be really good friends, but I’ve got to find somebody else who can help me with my business because you’re not offering to do that for me because you don’t have the business acumen, the situational knowledge, and you’re not showing up with advice. You’re not showing up as a consultative salesperson.Beth: I think there’s one other thing that we could talk a little bit about here that lines up with this and that is we have moved to a whole process of decision by committee. It’s not how I initially started, it was very easy to get a couple of people and get them together and now it’s really, really decision by committee, but more importantly, what I think a lot of sales people don’t really recognize is that, let’s just say there’s 10 stakeholders, all 10 can kill that deal. But only one or two of them can actually say yes to it. So how do you address that with the evolution of the sales?Anthony:  You have to have a framework. And then Eat Their Lunch in chapter seven and eight, there’s a framework that’s outlined is how do you look at them, and then what are some of the decisions that you make? What do you do with an opponent? And an opponent would be somebody who you would describe as having very high engagement, and absolutely wants to do anything but work with you. So a preference to work with anybody or anybody who’s not you, and opponents are tricky. So do you bring them in early on? And my answer would be, if you have an executive leader who’s willing to say, “Listen, we’re going to let you speak your piece, but we’re still moving forward this idea,” then maybe you bring them in. Or do you set them to the side and say, “Wait till I build a consensus and then we’ll deal with that individual.”Anthony: There’s not a right answer here because it’s contextual and you have to look at it and decide what to do, but it’s tricky. And if you don’t have the framework for deciding what’s this person’s disposition? How do I look at them? Are they an ally or are they neutral? Are they an obstacle? Are they an opponent? Are they what we call the CEO of the problem? The person who is actually going to be the one that has to say yes and make some recommendation that may even be signed by somebody higher up because you’re right? It’s all about consensus now, but it’s tricky for salespeople. And if you don’t have a framework, chapter seven enable give you one that will allow you to at least look at these things and say, “How do I make sense of it and how do I figure out what I should do in these scenarios?” So it’s a very, very tough challenge for people and from my view, no one’s provided them with any guidance on this up until now.Beth: And that’s really true. We see it a lot. We see the whole challenge in terms of, here’s the right framework, here’s the methodology, here’s the process, people are wanting to do better. So in that context, what do you believe that people should do to improve their approach? If there were some serious solid takeaways, what does that look like?Anthony: Well, there’s a few things. So the first thing I would say is, the one thing that has been talked about least and needed the most, is business acumen. And it’s you have to be a business person now and we’re really good at sales acumen. I can teach you to cold call, I can teach you to overcome objections, I can teach you these things, but it’s hard to make you interested in business. But if you were interested in business, and you’re reading, and you’re listening to CNBC instead of a country radio, or Howard Stern or whatever you listen to, if you would listen and you’d start paying attention and then start reading business books and business magazines and start thinking about the conversations that you’ve heard and what you’ve learned about other businesses and how to make those decisions, and you start capturing that, that’s where all the action has gone.Anthony: There’s a lot of people that can do all kinds of things that we would call sales acumen, but business argument is a differentiator. The second thing that’s a real differentiator, I call situational knowledge. Some people call it situational awareness, some people call it experience, but I call it situational knowledge because what that means to me is that you’ve seen this before and you’ve seen people make different decisions and get different results, and so your knowledge about the context of the situation that the client’s in, starts to be the ground and the foundation of how you give people advice. Why would you tell somebody to do this instead of that?Anthony: Well, because when they do the first thing and not the second thing, the results are terrible. Even though their friends are doing it and it’s wonderful for their friends, but the context is different. So, those two things, if you could just focus on how do I become a better business person? How do I become more consultative? And there’s a lot of confusion about what the word consultative means. It doesn’t mean not high pressure, it doesn’t mean not the hard sell, even though those things are true, it doesn’t mean that you ask really good questions, even though it’s really useful to ask really good questions. It means to counsel people on the decisions that they make in their business. So you consult, you provide advice, and you can’t be a trusted advisor without trust and advice. So you have to work really, really hard on the business acumen piece nowBeth: Why don’t you give someone an example of what business acumen actually sounds like? Because I know that there is a confusion or challenges around what does that exactly sound like? So do you want to just lay out something that would help people understand that this is really what we’re talking about and what’s really required to sell today?Anthony: Yeah, I mean if you were to even just go back to the conversation we were having about level four, saying something like, “Beth, in your industry right now, what we see is that it’s crowded, it’s very difficult to cut through the noise. And if you’re going to acquire the customers with the highest lifetime value faster, one of our strongest recommendations would be that you look at an omni-channel approach, because an omni-channel approach is going to allow us to help you identify those clients and message them with the exact message that’s going to allow you to acquire them faster, and also to acquire the clients that are going to stay with you longest.”Anthony: So if you don’t know that and you can’t have that conversation, then you’re missing a lot of what consultative selling sounds like. And it’s important that you get that. So that’s… it’s just a critical factor. Anybody can say, “My company’s been in business for 72 years and we’ve got this product set and here’s our features and benefits.” That part’s easy to do now. And the evolution of sales that we were talking about, the evolution is that, it’s moving away from super transactional and towards super relational. So you either have these skills or other people that have them are going to be able to eat your lunch.Beth:  Right. And really what you’re highlighting there, and this is the thing that I think most people struggle to get their arms around, is that they have a lot of incredible insights. They have seen customers make bad decisions, they know the mistakes they’re making, they know the areas that they’re not really thinking through or the questions that they should be asking but aren’t, and that’s really where you start coming up with having that strong point of view and having those insights that allow people to make a much better decision. That’s really what you’re after. You’re after the ability to help them make a decision that is really going to create the future they’re looking for.Anthony:  Exactly. And the best strategy right now, is one that’s based on insight in ideas, and not based on, “Let me prove to you that my company’s a good company and that you should trust me because of that.”Beth: Yup, exactly. Well, now I have one more question for you and I’m going to bust your chops a little bit. You always talk about that there are no rules in sales yet. You keep writing all these posts with these rules and we’re talking about rules today, and so I’m curious, you like your rules, but you didn’t really like anybody else’s rules, what are you really getting at?Anthony: You’re out of line. You’re completely out of line. Yeah, I do. I tend to write about rules and there really are no rules. Everything is contextual, and I think one of the challenges for salespeople when they go and they look for advice, is a lot of times you’ll see things like never cold call, or always send two emails before you call. There’s all these rules that in context probably make sense sometimes. I don’t know what times that is, but there are some things that I would say are just such good rules of thumb that you should follow them. Like you have to get business acumen and provide advice and you can’t be consultative if you’re not going to give people really good advice about what they should do. It doesn’t matter what your approach is, even though you’re really a nice person, you’re trusted, if you’re not dispensing the advice, you’re not consultative.Anthony: And I think one of the things that I’m most concerned about is that for a long time you could be a know nothing. You didn’t have to be a business expert, you didn’t have to care about business to be a sales person, but now you do. And all those kinds of things are emerging as sort of the rule sets that we’re playing with right now, and I think that when people look at any of the rules that I’ve written, I’ve written a couple of things. I’ve written the new rules for B2B I know recently, and I wrote the rules for consensus.Anthony: Even though I don’t believe there’s any rules, I do have to say something to get people’s attention to focus on the things that seem to be most important right now, and the only rule that I’m going to share with you right now is, I’m allowed to write rules, posts if I want to, even though I believe that there are no rules and you have to know them all because it just… it works to get people to pay attention and look at things. So a little bit of that, just making sure that people read itBeth:  Well. And I know you well enough to know that a rule today might be a different rule tomorrow because we’re constantly trying to ebb and flow with what the environment dictates. And so I expect more rules from you.Anthony:  You will get them much. Sure.Beth:  Well, that’s all I have for you.Anthony:  All right, well, thank you. That was great.Beth: Very good. Well, we’ll have another one of these coming up, so please pay attention because we will start posting these very regularly.Anthony:  All right, here we go. I’m hitting stop.last_img read more

Who is Yogi Adityanath?

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first_imgThe importance of being Yogi Adityanath  Adityanath runs the Hindu Yuva Vahini in Purvanchal, an outfit that has been often accused of instigating communal tension. This Bajrang Dal-style organisation is particularly effective in the east U.P. districts of Deoria, Kushinagar, Maharajganj, Basti, Sant Kabir Nagar and Siddharthnagar. Here, its activists have been accused of converting minor incidents into communal conflagrations.However during these elections, the Hindu Yuva Vahini broke after some of its members refused to retire some of their candidates. Adityanath expelled some of them.During the recent elections, the BJP leadership for the first time deployed Adityanath extensively in western U.P. after the first phase. Yogi Adityanath, whose real name is Ajay Singh Bisht, is a five-time BJP MP from Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh. He is 44 years old.A Thakur from Uttarakhand by birth, Adityanath earned a graduate degree in Science from Garhwal University in Srinagar. His Lok Sabha profile says he is a “religious missionary and social worker.”Awaidhnath, Mahant of the powerful and wealthy Gorakhnath Temple who had won Gorakhpur thrice consecutively, passed on both his political and religious legacy to Adityanath. Awaidhnath died in 2014.Also Readlast_img read more

Lecturer shot dead by student in Sonipat

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first_imgAn ad hoc lecturer was shot dead on Tuesday allegedly by a second year student at Shaheed Dalbir Singh College in Pipli village near Kharkhoda in Sonipat district, the police said. The accused was angry as the lecturer had rebuked him following a female student’s complaint, they added. The deceased, Rajesh Malik, was aged between 35 to 40 years, they said.Four shots fired The accused was identified as Jagmal, a BA II year student, the police said. Jagmal, a resident of a village near Kharkhoda, walked into the college on Tuesday morning and fired four shots at Mr. Malik, the police said adding that the bullets hit him in the chest and arms. He was declared brought dead at a hospital, they said. The accused fled from the spot, the police added.Girl student’s complaintA police officer said that the lecturer had reprimanded Jagmal after a girl student complained that he had harassed her. “That is why he developed animosity against the lecturer,” he said. The police said Jagmal, who belongs to a farming family, was absconding and teams had been formed to nab him. Mr. Malik is survived by his wife and two children.last_img read more

CM Parrikar to return to Goa on June 15

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first_imgGoa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar, who is currently undergoing medical treatment in the U.S., is expected to return to Goa on June 15, senior BJP MLA Nilesh Cabral said on Tuesday. “Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar is returning to Goa on June 15,” Mr. Cabral told the media on the sidelines of a State Tourism Ministry press conference in Panaji. Upendra Joshi, an official on special duty at the Chief Minister’s office also confirmed to The Hindu the news of Mr. Parrikar’s return after more than three months.However, a senior party official said he was still unsure. “As a party we do not know the exact date of arrival. He is likely to come to Goa in June, but the tickets as far as we know haven’t been booked yet,” the official said, requesting anonymity.An office memo, issued by the Home Ministry mentioning Mr. Parrikar’s presence at the State-organised Revolution Day event on June 18, went viral on social media. The memo states that he is expected to arrive at 8:50 a.m. for the event at the Martyr’s Memorial in Panaji. “Arrival of honourable Chief Minister. He will be received by Chief Secretary and Director General of Police,” the memorandum states, further listing the Chief Minister’s speech at 9:25 a.m.A BJP functionary, when contacted on Monday in this regard, had ruled out Mr. Parrikar’s return by June 18. “We are not aware of his return to Goa. As far as we know, there are some tests which are expected to be conducted later this month, after which his return dates will be confirmed. But as far as the party is concerned, as of now, he will not be in Goa to attend the June 18 function,” the official said requesting anonymity.last_img read more

Kashmir police release photos of Shujaat Bukhari’s killers

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first_imgThe Kashmir police have released two CCTV photographs of three men riding a motorcycle, who are believed to be responsible for the killing of Rising Kashmir editor Shujaat Bukhari in Srinagar on Thursday evening.In tweet, the Kashmir police requested the “general public” to identify the suspects in Thursday’s “terror attack” at the press enclave in Srinagar in which Bukhari and two of his personal security officers were killed.There has been widespread condemnation of Bukhari’s assassination both in Srinagar and in New Delhi.General public is requested to identify the suspects in pictures involved in today’s terror attack at press enclave.#ShujaatBukhari @JmuKmrPolice @spvaid @DIGCKRSGR @PoliceSgr pic.twitter.com/3cXM0CC8BD— Kashmir Zone Police (@KashmirPolice) June 14, 2018last_img read more

Produce file on minister’s wealth: Goa Lokayukta

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first_imgGoa Lokayukta, Justice (Retd) P.K. Misra on Thursday directed the Anti-Corruption Branch (ACB) of Goa Police to produce the entire file processing the complaint over the disproportionate assets of Goa Power Minister Pandurang Madkaikar and his wife Janita Madkaikar, the Sarpanch of Old Goa Panchayat, and all connected files on the matter. Lawyer Aires Rodrigues on June 7 filed a complaint with the Lokayukta accusing inaction by the ACB in probing the complaint against Mr. Madkaikar. On July 27, the Lokayukta directed the Chief Secretary of Goa and the Superintendent of Police, ACB to file a status report. The status report stated that the ACB had not pursued the complaint as the Lokayukta was now seized of the matter.Mr. Rodrigues said that Mr. Madkaikar’s company, Nikitasha Realtors Pvt. Ltd. had on April 1 inaugurated a bungalow at Old Goa estimated to cost around ₹200 crores and in his complaint on May 10 demanded that the ACB register an FIR under Sections 13(1) (d) & (e) of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1988 and Section 120 B of the Indian Penal Code against the two. Mr. Madkaikar’s Income-tax returns for the financial year 2015-16 showed his total income to be ₹1,44,389, and ₹24,389 as his wife’s, he said.The Lokayukta adjourned the hearing to August 16.last_img read more

Body of foreign national found hanging in an orchard in Bodh Gaya

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first_imgThe body of a foreign national was found hanging from a tree in an orchard in Bodh Gaya, Bihar on Saturday. Police said the deceased has been identified as James Allen, 33, from Australia.His body has been found hanging from a tree a an orchard in Rajpur area of Bodh Gaya.The police have also recovered a letter in which it has mentioned that all belongings should be handed over to his sister.“It is yet to be verified whether he has been murdered or committed suicide. Officials from the forensic department would be reaching the spot soon and examine the stuffs recovered from the spot to reach a conclusion”, Anil Kumar, Gaya city Superintendent of Police, told local journalists.The incident came to light when some local residents noticed it while passing through the area on Saturday morning. They immediately informed the local police.The police have found a bag, a diary and water bottle at the spot. “Phone numbers with Australian code in the diary suggest he could be from Australia”, said police officials.last_img read more

Woman killed by trap laid to catch boars

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first_imgAn electric trap set to kill wild boars for their meat claimed the life of a woman and critically injured a minor girl at Nagajodi village under Jharigaon block of Odisha’s Nabarangur district on Wednesday.The deceased has been identified as Jalia Harijan, 22. Laxmi Harijan, 14, the critically injured girl has been admitted in the district hospital. The duo, along with their friends, was returning home after watching a show at a neighbouring village at the time of the mishap.last_img

It’s Lalu’s ‘Ram’ vs Paswan’s ‘Lakshman’

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first_img“Pashupati mera Lakshman hain… woh bhi aapka khyal waise hi rakhega jaise main (Pashupati is my Lakshman… he will take care of you like I have),” Lok Janshakti Party chief and eight-time MP from Hajipur Ram Vilas Paswan has been telling people in the constituency while campaigning for his younger brother Pashupati Kumar Paras who is contesting against Mahagathbandhan candidate Shivchandra Ram of the Rashtriya Janata Dal. Citing poor health, Ram Vilas Paswan this time opted out of the Lok Sabha poll and fielded his brother from his traditional Hajipur (reserved) constituency but his ‘Lakshman’ is apparently locked in a tough battle against RJD chief Lalu Prasad’s Shivchandra ‘Ram’.Local vs outsider Mr. Ram is a local from Mahua block of Vaishali district, while Mr. Paras comes from Alauli of Khagaria district. The three Assembly constituencies of Hajipur Lok Sabha seat — Lalganj, Mahnar and Hajipur — are currently held by the NDA while three others — Mahua, Raghopur and Rajapakar — are with the RJD. Lalu Prasad’s two sons — Tej Pratap Yadav and Tejashwi Yadav — represent Mahua and Raghopur constituencies respectively, and Mr. Ram is a legislator from Rajapakar. “It’s a battle between Lalu’s Ram and Ram Vilas Paswan’s Lakshman… it’s also a contest between local versus outsider,” said sexagenarian Jagdish Rai of Raghopur.Since 1977, Mr. Paswan has won the Hajipur parliamentary seat eight times. In 2009 LS election, he lost to JD(U)’s Ram Sundar Das. He has done some development work including opening zonal office of Food Corporation of India and East Central Railway zonal HQ. This time, Mr. Paswan is working hard to make his younger brother win the seat. Recently, he gave full-page advertisement in local dailies telling the Hajipur residents that he was “dedicating his younger brother Pashupati Paras for the services of his mother, Hajipur”, and would himself continue to serve them from the other side. He also had outlined the development works he undertook for the constituency.‘Father’s prestige’On the other hand, RJD leader Tejashwi Yadav too has been telling voters that his father’s prestige is at stake in Hajipur and they should help Mr. Ram win. Mr Ram, who is said to be close to Mr. Tejashwi and Mr. Lalu, was a Minister in the previous grand alliance government in the State. Mr. Lalu’s elder son Tej Pratap Yadav’s Lalu-Rabri Morcha too has fielded Balinder Ram, a local leader. “Shivchandra is the son of the soil, while Paras is not Paswan, and he also comes from Khagaria,” Madho Singh, a retired LIC employee, said in Mahua. He added that a section of the people may vote for the NDA candidate in the name of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.Caste calculations of the Hajipur seat suggest that the contest between the NDA and the Mahagathbandhan candidates appears to be tough and the victory margin might not be like “what Ram Vilas Paswan has been bagging”. With 3.5 lakh Yadavs, 1 lakh Muslims,1.40 lakh Kushwahas and 1.10 lakh Ravidas, the Mahagathbandhan candidate appears to be on a strong pitch, while the NDA nominee seems to be equally strong with 2.5 lakh EBC (Extremely Backward Caste), 1.40 lakh Bhumihars, 2.5 lakh Rajputs, over 60,000 Brahmins and 1.30 lakh Paswans.last_img read more

Communist Party Takes Aim at Elite Scientists

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first_imgLong considered the capstone of a scientific career in China, election to the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) confers so much prestige on those anointed that organizations often try to recruit CAS members or reward their own with a guarantee of lifetime employment. But China’s Communist Party has ordered a reform of China’s academy membership system that may be aimed at curtailing privileges for academicians, or yuanshi. The surprise move “is completely outside my expectations,” says Cao Cong, a Chinese science policy scholar at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom.The yuanshi system has come under mounting criticism, especially after a researcher was elected to the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE) for his contributions to making cigarettes less harmful and after revelations of a corrupt railway official’s failed attempts to bribe his way into CAS. Many rank-and-file Chinese scientists both envy and chafe at the real and imagined privileges that yuanshi enjoy. The Education Ministry holds academicians in such high esteem that one metric it uses to evaluate universities is the number of yuanshi on the payroll. As a result, academicians might hold concurrent positions at several universities and institutes, fattening their wallets in the process.Some observers view the yuanshi system as a hindrance to Chinese science and have called for abolishing it all together. That’s why many in China’s blogosphere were elated to learn that Communist Party leaders, in an opus on economic, social, and legal reforms released after a party powwow in Beijing last week, called for the “reform of election and management of the academician system” and to “implement regulations regarding retirement and withdrawal” of members. It’s uncertain how CAS will carry out the order. A researcher who has been advising CAS on reforms says he has been bombarded with questions about specific measures from both academy leaders and China’s official media—suggesting that CAS leaders were caught off-guard by the high-level mandate.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Current CAS bylaws stipulate that when academicians turn 80, they become senior members, akin to emeritus members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and lose their rights to recommend and vote on future members, though the word “retirement” is not mentioned. The bylaws also state that academic misconduct can result in a yuanshi’s expulsion. It’s not clear what more CAS could do to appease the country’s top leaders and the broader scientific community, the researcher says, but the academies will probably have a reform plan ready for a joint CAS and CAE meeting in June.last_img read more

NBA to bring preseason game to India soon

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first_imgNational Basketball Association (NBA) is planning to bring a pre-season game to India in an effort to tap the growing market for the sport in the country.Realising the market potential of basketball in the country, the NBA had opened an elite basketball training center—NBA Academy India—at the Jaypee Greens Integrated Sports Complex in Greater Noida in May last year.The NBA had also tied up with Reliance Foundation for its junior NBA program which has already reached more than six million youth and trained more than 5,000 physical education instructors nationwide since its launch in 2013.Read it at Business Today Related Itemslast_img

Tourism Australia targets AUD 1.9 bn overnight visitor spend from India by 2020

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first_imgTourism Australia has achieved its target of receiving 3,00,000 Indian visitors much ahead of its time in 2017, a target set for 2020. The Australian Government agency in its analysis about the Indian market stated that the country received a total of 302,655 Indian visitors for the year ended December 2017, thereby marking a rise of 15.4% compared to the same period last year. Tourism Australia is expecting about 3,68,000 Indian visitors to the country in FY2019-20 with a growth of 9.1%.Talking the potential of the Indian market for Australia, Brent Anderson, Regional General Manager, South & South East Asia, Tourism Australia, said that India currently is the eighth largest inbound market for arrivals for December 2017, and they are looking at India to rank on the fifth position by 2025.Read it at Travel Biz Monitor Related Itemslast_img read more

Why Specially-abled Indian Students’ Parents Prefer to Re-locate to The US

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first_imgRaising a specially-abled child is an extremely challenging task for parents all over the world. In India, the challenge becomes tougher due to an overburdened healthcare system ill-equipped to provide for the special needs of such children, an education system obsessed with rote-learning and marks, and a superstitious society that equates mental disorders with insanity.Read it at India Today Related Itemslast_img

Sales at Trump Tower Mumbai Have Chilled

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first_imgOne stretch of scaffolding along Mumbai’s skyscraper-speckled skyline is especially dense. More than a dozen luxury apartment towers stand unfinished, and their concrete hulls reach up into this seaside city’s thick haze. Among them, one has generated unusual buzz. It is the one that will soon glimmer with a facade of gold-tinted glass, with the name of the president of the United States emblazoned across it.Ritesh Shah once worked in New York City’s diamond district, not so far from the original Trump Tower. He’d gaze up at the building in awe. Then, in 2014, Donald Trump announced that he’d be lending his name to a 75-story building in Shah’s native city, slated for opening in late 2018. Together, more than 50 diamond traders, including Shah, bought apartments – and they got a deep bulk discount in the process, he said.The discount was important, even for this slice of India’s super-rich. Units in Trump Tower Mumbai are listed at prices roughly 30 percent higher than units in comparable buildings. The premium derives from the brand-licensing agreement the Trump Organization signed with the building’s developers: the Lodha Group, a giant, family-owned real estate empire much like Trump’s.The Lodhas staked the building’s success on Trump’s brand value. Trump brags that his brand has only become “hotter” since his political career took off, and in some partnership deals around the world, that would seem to be the case. But in Mumbai, Trump and his partners may have overestimated his self-proclaimed “Midas touch.”Sales “windows” for the tower in Mumbai have been offered since 2014, yet just over half of the building’s 400 units have sold, according to the Lodha Group. That would mean roughly a quarter of the units sold belong to Shah and his fellow diamond traders.A spokeswoman for the Lodha Group said the company had offered a “limited inventory” for the Trump Tower until now and that “an iconic real estate brand such as Trump demands a unique approach in everything we do, right from planning to selling.”But Suparna Salaskar, a former Lodha Group employee who managed interactions with buyers until just a few months ago, said in an interview that she knew of only one unit being sold since Trump announced his candidacy in June 2015. The Lodha spokeswoman did not respond to a request to confirm Salaskar’s observation but said the most recent of three sales windows was in June 2016.The Trump Organization also did not respond to a request for comment. In addition to Trump Tower Mumbai, the company has brand-licensing deals for buildings in three other Indian cities.The Mumbai apartments are not expensive by Trump standards. Three-bedroom units start at $1.3 million. But the building is surrounded by competitors, all facing a market slump, and the president-elect’s name may not be hot enough to prevail.“The question was always: Does the market value his brand that much higher?” said Ashutosh Limaye, head of research at Jones Lang LaSalle in Mumbai.The building boom in Mumbai’s Lower Parel and Worli neighborhoods has created a glut of luxury apartments, Limaye said, although most of the towers have yet to be completed. Developers are in a race to finish their projects as prospective customers hold off buying until they can be assured of move-in dates. The Trump Tower is not ahead in this race.Nevertheless, Shah, the diamond dealer, said part of the reason that he and his colleagues bought at the Trump Tower was that they thought the Trump Organization would pressure the Lodhas to complete construction by the promised date. Their decision stemmed from particularly Indian factors, too.Shah had an apartment in a different high-rise nearby, “but the vastu in the building was totally off,” he said, referring to the age-old Hindu science of architecture, similar to feng shui. Vastu purports that a building’s layout profoundly affects its inhabitants’ harmony with their surroundings — and some business executives think bad vastu can ruin a fortune. Shah has had a priest who specializes in vastu assess his purchase. “I know that at least the part with my apartment is relatively good,” he said.He and the other diamond traders moving into the building are all members of the small but financially powerful Jain community, as are the Lodhas. The Trump Tower is going up next to an ornate Jain temple, which is a selling point.Shah explained that Jain diamond dealers had made real estate deals with the Lodhas before, but had been disappointed by construction delays. Salaskar said that an average Lodha-built apartment would “come into possession two to three years late” and that buyers at the Trump Tower have been told that they could have to wait until 2019 for completion.Salaskar said she had dealt with dozens of potential buyers in Trump Tower Mumbai and that just one or two were ultimately deterred by Donald Trump’s politics. In fact, she said, most saw Trump’s brash style as an alluring part of his brand. Trump is someone who, in business and politics, gets things done “by hook or by crook,” she said.Shah said that the possibility that Trump might be supervising the project, even indirectly, was assuring. If he had been an American citizen, he would have voted for Trump in November, he said. “As we’ve seen in India, democracyhas been a mess,” Shah said. Referring to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, he added, “Modi and Trump are half-dictators, and that’s what we need, actually, in India and in America.”Real estate and politics are often intertwined in India, and the Lodha family is well-placed at the intersection of the two endeavors. The Lodha Group was founded by Mangal Prabhat Lodha, who is vice president of the state branch of the Bharatiya Janata Party, which is led nationally by Modi.Most wealthy Indians, including politicians, invest large sums of untaxed cash, sometimes called “black money,” in property. And with a little grease, powerful politicians often finagle special permissions or even land for developers, which can yield big financial gains.In 2011, Indian tax authorities discovered that the Lodha Group had about $30 million in unreported income, according to court documents. The company was ordered to pay $1 million in fines and settled a tax bill for an undisclosed amount.As Trump has promised to do, Mangal Lodha — who is worth $1.55 billion, according to Forbes — handed over daily management of his company to his sons in 2003 as his own political stature grew. Lodha’s elder son, Abhishek, told The Washington Post in a statement that the Lodhas are “extremely pleased that Mr. Trump was elected president and wish him all the best as he takes charge of the world’s foremost democracy.” Limaye, the real estate expert, said he wasn’t so sure Trump’s election would be good for the Lodhas. “If the building is delayed by the usual number of years, then it will only open once Trump’s first term is finished,” he said. “And who can predict what his name will signify then?” — Washington Post Related Itemslast_img read more

Indians Are Reshaping The Internet

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first_imgIt is perhaps the silliest spat of the year. Since September, PewDiePie, a Swedish Internet personality whose real name is Felix Kjellberg, has waged a war of words with T-Series, an Indian record label and film producer. For five years, PewDiePie has been the most subscribed channel on YouTube, amassing more than 76 million subscribers. T-Series, however, is threatening to usurp his crown with its mix of Bollywood and devotional songs. With millions of movie-mad Indians becoming YouTube viewers, T-Series’ victory is inevitable.This is part of a striking trend: Indians are an increasing powerful presence online. Even with an Internet penetration rate of less than 30 percent, India is the largest market for WhatsApp and its parent company, Facebook. It ranks third by users on Instagram and fourth on Twitter, according to eMarketer, a research firm. Four of Tinder’s top 10 cities by paying users are in India. And 1 in 10 Uber rides globally occurs in India, a proportion that is set to grow.Tech leaders look at these statistics with cartoon dollar signs on their eyes. India was the only country to get its own section in the “recent milestones” section of Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos’s letter to shareholders this year. (Bezos also owns The Washington Post.) And Sundar Pichai, the Indian-born chief executive of Google, has mentioned India in six out of the company’s last seven earnings calls. The investment bank Morgan Stanley expects smartphone penetration to more than double between 2017 and 2020.India represents a microcosm of the world’s unconnected markets. User growth in the United States is stagnant; Europe is a regulatory morass. And unlike China, India imposes few restrictions on foreign Internet firms. Its Web users are keener on Western brands than on homegrown ones.But for years, data prices remained high and growth slow. That changed in September 2016, with the launch of Jio, a mobile network offering low-cost, high-speed data. Other networks scrambled to compete, offering ever-greater data allowances at lower prices. The effect is startling: Mobile Internet connections grew from 346 million in late 2016 to 491 million this year, according to India’s telecoms regulator. In the same period, monthly data consumption jumped by a factor of more than 13, to 3.2 gigabytes per user.As Indians come online in the hundreds of millions, the first thing they do is connect with their friends on WhatsApp and Facebook. They then stream Bollywood movies and pornography. Lots of pornography. Searches for “Hindi sexy film” on PornHub grew 27,814 percent in 2018.There is one thing missing from this spectacular story of falling costs and rocketing growth: profit. India remains too poor for premium services. Apple, which does not discount its phones, sells just 1 percent of smartphones in India. A Netflix subscription is unaffordable for about 99 percent of Indians. And revenue from India remains stubbornly low for Facebook and Google. Amazon’s Indian subsidiary saw losses grow 30 percent to 63 billion rupees ($880 million) in the year ended March 2018.That hardly seems to matter. Silicon Valley firms are clear that they don’t expect returns from India in the short or even medium term. Apple’s Tim Cook has said his company will be in India for a thousand years. Free, ad-based services are more focused on getting in and exposing new users to their services before another company captures their attention. The hope is that Indians will stick around.They might. A bigger question is whether the firms themselves have staying power. Google is struggling to match Facebook’s momentum in ad sales in India. Facebook is bleeding goodwill, plagued with regulatory and legal challenges and facing a lawsuit on its data-sharing practices before India’s Supreme Court.Yet even in the short term, India is having a profound effect both on tech firms and the Web at large. Companies have been experimenting with products specifically for India, including adding payments and other business services to WhatsApp and cash payments to Uber, both of which have spread to multiple countries. Uber offers or is planning novel services, such as booking three-wheeler auto-rickshaws or arranging multiple modes of transport through the app. And Tinder picked India, where men far outnumber women on dating apps, to launch My Move, which allows women to choose whether men can approach them.Indians may have another, subtler effect on the Web. As they become the largest market on the open, non-Chinese Web, content-creators will turn their attention to serving them. Amazon and Netflix are already spending heavily on Indian shows and movies for their streaming services. YouTube is crucial to Google’s future in India. And last year, Facebook bid $600 million for online rights to the Indian Premier League cricket tournament. It lost to Hotstar, a runaway streaming success owned by 21st Century Fox. This year Facebook appointed Hotstar’s chief executive as its new India boss.Tech companies’ experiments in India will determine not just the future of tech business but also how the Internet is experienced as the rest of the world comes online. Even PewDiePie will have to acknowledge this: An insult video aimed at T-Series, released in October, is one of his most-watched ever, no doubt owing to Indian viewers tuning in. As more Indians come online, he too will learn that he can’t beat them.Special To The Washington PostMirani is news editor at the Economist in London.  Related Itemslast_img read more