Category Archives: mslrf

Fostering a dream

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first_imgKim Snodgrass clearly remembers Dec. 11, 1998. It was her first day in the sixth grade, and the beginning of her steady education — as well as her salvation.“From then on, I never missed a day of school,” said the master’s student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Risk and Prevention Program, who will graduate today armed with ambition and a story of overcoming adversity.Snodgrass, a fresh-faced, blued-eyed blonde, could be a poster child for the stereotypical Californian. She could also be a poster child for foster care.As a young girl, she and her family were on the run. They camped out in the mountains and hopped to and from motels and shelters across southern California. They skipped out on apartments whenever the rent was due. They stole to survive, walking out of grocery stores with carts full of food, or filling up the car at gas stations, and then driving away without paying.“That is what we were so used to, stealing things and getting what we needed whenever we needed it.”Snodgrass watched as her stepfather and mother’s addiction to drugs and alcohol broke the family apart, gradually “disintegrating” her parents in the process. Eventually, her mother lost all rights to her five children. Between age 5 and 11, Snodgrass was in and out of at least 10 foster homes. Finally, at age 16, her long-term foster family adopted her, her younger brother, Max, and sister, Jennifer.“I always knew from an early age what [my mother and stepfather] were doing was wrong, and I made a pact to myself that I was going to get myself out of this hole. I was not ever going to touch drugs or alcohol or smoke, and I was going to make it.”Though she had only had sporadic formal schooling before sixth grade, she knew her escape route depended on education. She became a driven student and excelled academically.“I used my education as my savior. It was like my thing that I could always go back to, no matter what happened in my life.”Snodgrass attended the University of California, Irvine, where she studied community and public service. It was there that she dedicated herself to helping foster care children.“When I entered college, I thought I needed a college degree to have a successful family. As a sophomore, I thought I needed a college degree to change the foster care population, as I found out that only 50 percent of foster youth graduate from high school. My junior year, I realized that I needed a graduate degree to really make an impact and help train others about how they can make change to make an even bigger impact.”With her new master’s degree, she hopes to provide foster care children with access to support systems and mentors who can help them to develop important life skills and succeed in high school and college. As part of her program at Harvard, she developed an intervention method to help foster care youth transition to college and beyond, and is currently working with an HGSE alumna to explore using her program at a local nonprofit.While at Harvard, she also produced an educational video about the foster care system, founded the club REACH (which stands for Realizing Every Action Creates Hope) to raise awareness about foster care youth in school, and worked on a model for a charter school designed for foster care children in connection with the Orangewood Children’s Foundation, a nonprofit in Santa Ana, Calif.She also made time to teach at two local schools. The fast pace is the standard for Snodgrass, who admitted that the overachiever mentality is something of a coping mechanism, one that offers her life a certain kind of balance.“I cram people into every second of the day. My schedule is back to back to back. It’s something that helps [keep] me from sitting down and crying. I don’t just dwell on the past, I think, ‘What can I do tomorrow?’”After Harvard, “the possibilities are endless,” said Snodgrass, who sees herself getting a Ph.D. and working in the policy realm, or running a charter school or nonprofit.But one thing is certain. Citing research that shows that children who face difficult challenges often succeed with the support of just one encouraging voice, Snodgrass sees her future mission clearly.“So many people helped me get where I am today. I want to go back and help others. My mission is to be a child advocate, and become that voice for them.”Her Harvard experience has helped her too, and prepared her to help others.“Harvard was 100 percent where I was supposed to be,” said Snodgrass. “I am going to have a big tool kit when I leave.”last_img read more

Piping up, to good effect

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first_imgCharles Brenton Fisk’s daughter once said that her father was “dedicated to his work the way that some people are dedicated to a true love.” The Memorial Church’s new organ is a product of that devotion.In 1943, the U.S. government tapped Fisk, then an 18-year-old Harvard student, to work for physicist Robert Oppenheimer in the bomb-trigger division of the Manhattan Project. Later, Fisk studied nuclear physics at Stanford University, but soon the onetime chorister at Christ Church in Cambridge traded his lab talents for his workshop skills to craft some of the most complex musical instruments.Eventually another Harvard man, the spiritual heart of the University for more than 40 years, noticed Fisk’s artistry. An accomplished organist himself, the Rev. Peter J. Gomes became the driving force behind a donor-funded, $6 million effort to provide his church with the type of sound it deserved.Senior reed voicer Michael Kraft tunes the row of pipes called the Trumpette.The dream of Gomes, who died a year ago, will be realized this Sunday when the new Fisk organ, Opus 139, is officially unveiled. The inauguration begins a series of events showcasing the 16-ton instrument.A 2005 committee led by Gomes agreed that two organs instead of one were needed to fill the church’s space adequately, one for the intimate Appleton Chapel, the other for the main body of the church. For the larger instrument, they turned to C.B. Fisk Inc., the mechanical-tracker organ company founded by Fisk, whose Opus 46 had been in the chapel since 1967.“Fisk epitomizes the classical principles of organ building,” said Christian Lane, associate University organist and choirmaster. “Through a well-constructed, mechanical-action touch … you are really just controlling the wind in this amazing and voluptuous way.”In 2010, the Opus 46 was dismantled for shipping to its new home, a Presbyterian church in Austin, Texas. A 1929 Skinner Organ Co. organ took its place in the chapel.Meanwhile, the new Fisk organ slated for the church’s rear gallery was nearing completion in a town more famous for its fishing fleet than for complicated musical machines. Only a small mahogany sign with the words “C.B. Fisk” identifies the workshop in an industrial park in Gloucester, Mass. Inside, dedicated artisans draft and draw, solder and saw. Small models of every organ the company has made are perched high on ledges scattered around the space. The models are a vital step in the creative process that begins with hand-drawn sketches and ends with sophisticated, three-dimensional computer designs.There’s a collegial ethos at the workshop, a Fisk hallmark. When there is a technical problem, the workers gather to discuss a solution. A reporter’s inquiry about business titles earns chuckles and the response: “We don’t pay too much attention to that kind of thing.”The employees are a mix of the mechanical and the musical, the methodical and the meticulous. A crafter of organ reed pipes is, fittingly, a clarinetist. Another worker made his own cello. There are drummers and guitarists, former boatbuilders, cabinetmakers, engineers, and freelance photographers. Above all, they are craftspeople who love working with their hands.Fisk, the story goes, liked to call his colleagues “blue-scholar workers.”“He was the most brilliant man I ever met,” said Greg Bover, the company’s vice president for operations, who is also project manager for the Memorial Church installation.The mouth area of gold-leafed pipe on the organ’s façade.At Harvard one recent afternoon, Michael Kraft, the company’s head reed voicer, was regulating the tone on some of the organ’s 3,049 pipes, the smallest of which stands only half an inch, and the largest 32 feet. The painstaking task takes months, for good reason. Tuning the organ only affects the pitch, explained Kraft, while the voicing process gives the instrument its distinct sound.“It’s giving each pipe its voice … we are talking about color, timbre, speech, all of the different qualities of the sound. That voicing process is only done once.”Kraft, who has a master’s degree in organ performance from the New England Conservatory, then tested his work by playing a little Johann Sebastian Bach. The sound was magnificent.Harvard’s Gund University Organist and Choirmaster Edward Jones reflected on Gomes’ musical legacy. Thanks to the insistence of the longtime Pusey Minister and Plummer Professor of Christian Morals, the organ’s pipes are sheathed in a brilliant 22-carat gold.“It’s a wonderful instrument. It’s musically eclectic and can do a large range of things,” said Jones. “The construction and architecture of the organ is so beautiful and has been so well thought out that it looks to my mind like it should have been here all along. I hope Peter is looking down with a big smile on his face.”last_img read more

Let’s put on a show

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first_imgAs a Harvard undergraduate, Diane Paulus haunted the halls of the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.), trying to absorb every ounce of its energy and ethos. She dreamed of being cast in an A.R.T. production, a rare but real option for a gifted College actor if a director saw fit. She worked as an usher and attended every show she could, but it wasn’t until after she left Harvard that she got a close look at a professional theater rehearsal.“I wasn’t inside a rehearsal hall until graduate school — that opportunity to just be in a high-level process. I remember thinking when I was a young director, ‘How do you direct? … Maybe one day I will get to see it.’”Since Paulus ’88 took the helm of the A.R.T. as its artistic director in 2009, she has made sure that undergraduates interested in the business of professional theater can have a chance to see every side of that high-octane process up close as part of the theater’s robust internship program.As part of Wintersession between semesters, nine College students traveled to New York City as A.R.T. interns to help Paulus and her production team in the exciting and exhaustive process of bringing a new production to life. The musical “Witness Uganda” will have its world premiere at the A.R.T. on Feb. 4.Intern Mark Mauriello ’15 working with Paulus. As producing intern Mauriello kept tabs on the show’s daily operations.For close to a month, the students, along with the cast and crew, worked on the show that explores the challenges faced by American aid workers around the world. The interns helped with everything from script edits to learning the show’s complex choreography.They had a hand in “all the intricate layers of the physical life of a production,” said Paulus. “They were really heart and soul involved in it, and impacting the whole process.”Producing intern Mark Mauriello ’15 kept tabs on the show’s daily operations. From a spot on the floor in the front of the rehearsal room, he took meticulous notes, watching for changes in the show’s set, staging, or script, and reporting back to the producer in Cambridge.“Every day is totally different, which is part of the best thing about it,” said Mauriello during a lunch break from rehearsals.The Kirkland House junior has long been involved with Harvard’s theater scene, and is currently performing in “The Donkey Show,” rolling around Oberon’s disco-themed set on skates as the character Dr. Wheelgood. A theater arts and performance concentrator who is planning a career in the field, Mauriello he said he was “really, really lucky,” to have worked with the A.R.T.“To be able to sit in the room with someone like Diane Paulus, who is so unbelievably brilliant and great at what she does, and just to learn by watching her do things and being engaged with her work is a huge learning experience.”Choreography intern Megan Murdock ’14 relied on her experience in southwestern Uganda last summer studying traditional East African dance to offer suggestions and information to the choreography team during her internship.A neurobiology concentrator, Murdock explained certain customs to the cast and crew, like how the ankle rattle, something the choreographers considered adding to a production number, is used in the Ugandan dances she learned, and the nuances of the local handshake. She also helped to track the blocking of each dance sequence, and the videotape of some dance numbers.Breaking into the competitive world of theater is notoriously tough, but the interns agreed that their A.R.T. experience has helped them.“It gives you a leg up when you get out of college if you’ve already had the chance to work in a professional production environment,” said Murdock, who hopes to pursue a career in dance after graduation. She added that Paulus’ reputation as a dynamic director was quickly confirmed. “I had heard about her and how amazing she is to work with … and it’s all true.”As one of the two stage management interns working with the show, the job of Jumai Yusuf ’16 during rehearsals was to help manage the sets’ moving parts and props, and to take detailed notes about where items needed to go at any point in the show.At Harvard, Yusuf, a neurobiology concentrator, has managed, produced, or directed student productions. But she said being in the room watching and helping a professional show come to life was something different.“One of the biggest differences is that they’re rehearsing the show, but but they are also working on the script. They are making script changes very often throughout the day. It was really cool to see that happen, and to see what things ended up changing.”And getting to watch Paulus in full directing mode was special.“She is so creative. She makes little changes that I would never have thought of that then greatly enhance the production. … It’s really fascinating to see her work.”Paulus said the challenge of creating a new work is a complex, collaborative process, one that should be an integral part of the learning process at Harvard.“Things are pushed, pulled, rejected, tried on, tried a different way … all of that is really the experience, which is such a theme of what we are talking about at Harvard. How do we provide that experience for our students, that investigation of the process, of the questions you ask, and show [students] how delicate and hard it is to crack something open?”Seniors Lily Glimcher, Susanna Wolk, and Madeline Smith; juniors Brenna McDuffie and Selena Kim; and freshman Kyra Atekwana also worked as A.R.T. interns with the production.last_img read more

Sustainable Food Systems

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first_imgThe University of Georgia Sustainable Food Systems Initiative has awarded three interdisciplinary teams of faculty with the initiative’s third round of Sustainable Food Systems Fellowships. In 2013, faculty representing several UGA colleges launched the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, which recognizes that many of the problems facing the intersection of agricultural and natural ecology require interdisciplinary solutions. “One of the grand challenges facing humanity over the next 50 years is increasing the security and resiliency of the food systems,” said Liz Kramer, director of the Natural Resources Spatial Analysis Laboratory and of the Sustainable Food System Initiative. “Building sustainable food production, processing and distribution systems will require integrating a wide range of environmental, economic and social issues.” These fellowships, which will be given to graduate students beginning in fall 2017, will be paid for by a grant from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA). This is the second NIFA grant that the initiative has received to fund its fellowships. Six master’s degree students have benefited from this program since 2013. The initiative’s goal is to set up a collaborative framework to enable interdepartmental faculty to collaborate on questions of agricultural production, energy, water, the environment, economics, health, nutrition and social justice. This year, the selection committee has selected three projects for funding:Robert Bringolf, Warnell School of Forestry associate professor, and Nick Fuhrman, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences assistant professor, will develop a resource program for teaching farmers about sustainable aquaponics systems.Chad Paton, College of Family and Consumer Sciences assistant professor, and Dave Hoisington, senior research scientist and director of the UGA-housed U.S. Feed the Future Peanut and Mycotoxin Innovation Lab, will investigate improving agricultural production methods of increasing vitamin A intake in sub-Saharan Africa.Janani Rajbhandari-Thapa and Donglan Zhan, assistant professors in the College of Public Health’s Department of Health Policy and Management, and Melissa Hallow, assistant professor in the College of Engineering and CPH’s Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, will investigate and model the interaction between consumer behavior and food supply and how that relationship can help support a healthy and sustainable food system in Georgia.“Since we received the initial grant that set up the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, we have seen some very successful research projects and some very talented graduate students,” Kramer said. “I believe these projects are proving that the possibilities that come with collaborative research are worth leaving our silos and finding like-minded scientists across campus.” The current NIFA grant will also help launch a new graduate certificate in Sustainable Food Systems, which is pending approval. The certificate will be housed in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “We hope to use the certificate to expand interdisciplinary training in sustainable food systems beyond the fellowships and our monthly seminar series,” Kramer added. “In addition, we hope these new programs will help us to reach non-traditional and underrepresented students to explore new areas of interdisciplinary research.For more information about UGA’s Sustainable Food Systems Initiative and past projects, visit http://sustainablefoodsystems.uga.edu.last_img read more

Washington update, millennials, credit union relevance headline exec sessions at NAFCU Annual

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first_imgCredit union executives at NAFCU’s Annual Conference on Thursday received a Washington update from the association’s legislative and regulatory staff, learned how to stay relevant to the industry and were briefed on how to retain and hire millennials.NAFCU’s legislative and regulatory teams spoke in an open format to credit union executives, providing an update on the industry and what is happening in Washington. (Read more here.)Also on Thursday, NAFCU Director of Education Devon Lyon led a session on the relevancy of credit unions. He touched on mobile banking and electronic financial services, such as ATMs, online loan payments and remote deposit capture. He also discussed the importance of data security and fintech.Jennifer Kuhn, leadership and team development expert at Jennifer Kuhn LLC, talked about hiring and retaining millennials. She discussed this generation’s communication preferences and the importance of credit unions knowing their audience. continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

UK roundup: Drinks maker appoints Willis Towers Watson to DB scheme

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first_imgOneDB launched in June last year and now has seven clients, with more than 6,000 members and £900m of assets between them. The UK pension fund for drinks company Beam Suntory has appointed Willis Towers Watson to run provide a bundled service including investment, actuarial and administration functions.The £50m (€55m) defined benefit (DB) fund is the latest client of Willis Towers Watson’s OneDB service, an all-in-one offering for DB funds to offer multiple services and help reduce costs.Ron Welsh, chair of the scheme’s trustee board, said Willis Towers Watson was “a natural choice” having previously provided actuarial services for several years.Gareth Strange, head of OneDB, added: “For many corporate sponsors and scheme trustees the burden of managing legacy DB pension schemes is becoming more and more challenging as the regulatory environment, investment options and administration becomes more complex.” Beam Suntory owns the Jim Beam whisky brandBeam Suntory owns a number of alcoholic drink brands, including Jim Beam and Sipsmith.Trustee company wound up after insolvency investigationA UK court has forcibly wound up a trustee company after an Insolvency Service investigation found it had inappropriately invested £14m while overseeing two pension schemes.Ecroignard Trustees was responsible for the Uniway Systems Retirement Benefits Scheme and the Genwick Retirement Benefits Scheme, which had 229 members and £14m of investments between them.Investigators found “numerous instances of misconduct”, the Insolvency Service said, including the use of funds to invest in “vehicles that were illiquid, high-risk and not necessarily suitable for the members”.Ecroignard also “failed to comply with statutory requirements, best practice guidance and internal governance requirements”, the Insolvency Service said. Members were not told of changes to the investments or given a choice to move their pension savings.The trustee firm also “failed to maintain and preserve adequate books and records”, presenting problems to investigators trying to identify all investments and how much each member had contributed.The Insolvency Service also said it was “unclear” who had been in charge of the company for the past two years. Former director Roger Bessent resigned in April 2017 and was banned from holding company management roles in November that year. However, he remained the sole signatory on Ecroignard’s bank account until October 2018.Investigators reported that the current official director, Anthony Wakefield, had “insufficient knowledge” of Ecroignard and was unable to provide information – including the schemes’ assets and status.last_img read more

DOF AHTS duo to support OMV drilling ops in New Zealand

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first_imgCOSLProspector; Source COSL DrillingOslo-listed offshore supply vessel owner DOF has won work for two AHTS contracts to support OMV’s drilling operations in New Zealand.Skandi Emerald and Skandi Atlantic, built-in 2011 and 2012 respectively, have been contracted by OMV NZ for 2 wells firm, plus 2 x 1 well options, to support semi-submersible drilling rig COSLProspector.Both vessels are currently supporting the same rig with Tamarind Resources, also in New Zealand. The OMV work will begin after the completion of the current campaign, expected during Q4 2019, DOF said.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

House bill seeks ‘better facilities’ for 2 airports in Aklan

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first_imgThe proposed AAA has the power toexercise police authority to maintain peace and order within the premises,security of passengers, cargoes, aircraft, airport equipment, structures,personnel, fund, and documents; and to regulate the entry, exit and movementwithin the airports. As of this writing, Haresco’s measureis pending under the committee on government enterprises and privatization.(With a report from Akean Forum/PN) The corporate powers of airportauthorities will be exercised by the Board of Directors with its generalmanager as vice chairman and the Secretary of Transportation as ex-officio chairman. The Board, upon recommendation of thegeneral manager, is mandated to fix the rates of dues, charges, fees, andassessments for the use of airport premises, among others. Among the duties and functions of AAAare to formulate a comprehensive and integrated development policy and programsof the airports and to control, supervise, construct, maintain, operate, andprovide facilities for services for the efficient functioning of the airports. “The facilities of two airports mustbe improved for better services offered to tourists visiting Boracay Island.The influx of visitors is tantamount to greater investments, generating jobsand giving wider economic opportunities for the people of Aklan,” Haresco said. Second District Rep. Teodorico HarescoJr. authored House Bill 4176 for the establishment of Aklan Airport Authority(AAA) to operate and administer the Caticlan Airport in Malay town and theKalibo International Airport.        The members of the Board are the Aklanprovincial governor, the secretaries of Finance, Tourism and Justice, theCommissioner of Immigration, and four members from the private sector in theprovince with a term of three years. The general manager, appointed by theAAA board, is tasked to supervise the day-to-day management, operation andadministration of the airports, grant permits or concessions to do businesswithin the premises, and undertake researches, studies, investigations, andother activities related to its present operations and future improvements. KALIBO, Aklan – A body tasked tooversee the efficient and effective economical management and supervision ofAklan’s two airports was proposed in the House of Representatives. The Kalibo International Airport is one of the two airports under a House of Representatives bill which seeks for the establishment of Aklan Airport Authority – tasked to look into the facilities of the two airports amid influx of tourists visiting Boracay Island in Malay town. AKEAN FORUM last_img read more

Beverly Jean Hounchell, 75, Brookville

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first_imgBeverly J. Hounchell, age 75, of Brookville, Indiana died unexpectedly Saturday, July 27, 2019 at McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital in Oxford, Ohio.Born August 4, 1943 in Connersville, Indiana she was the daughter of the late Maurice & Hazel (Long) Bradburn.  On November 30, 1989 she was united in marriage to Steve Hounchell and he survives.In her leisure time she enjoyed crocheting and making blankets, as well as reading.Besides Steve, her husband of 30 years, survivors include four children,  Carey (Lisa Scruggs) Ball of Brookville, Indiana, Leanna (Darel) Cooper of Brookville, Indiana,  Nick (Ginger) Ball of Crossville, Tennessee, Lisa (Ron) Murphy of Cincinnati, Ohio; twelve grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren.In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a sister, Evelyn Baldwin, and a brother Clinton Bradburn.In accordance with Beverley’s wishes, private visitation and funeral services will be held with burial at Maple Grove Cemetery in Brookville, Indiana.Memorial contributions may be directed to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society or Susan G. Komen for the Cure.  The staff of Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home are honored to serve the family of Beverly Hounchell, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

United force draw with the Baggies

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first_img Press Association The Holland international scored his first goal for the club to break Albion’s hearts just as they looked like securing victory. Saido Berahino had fired them 2-1 ahead with his seventh goal of the season in the second half after Marouane Fellaini bagged his first goal for United. The changes, though, did little to end United’s stuttering season as the Baggies grabbed a perfect start. They had already dominated possession without hurting United before they swept ahead in the eighth minute. Graham Dorrans flicked on Myhill’s clearance for Wisdom to scamper down the right and his clever cut back found Sessegnon to finish emphatically into the top corner from 18 yards. Myhill saved from Robin van Persie as United tried to find an instant response but the visitors were wasteful and their final ball was often too easy for the Baggies. Myhill, who made a routine stop from Di Maria, was given catching practice as United toiled against organised Albion. In contrast Berahino was giving Marcos Rojo an uncomfortable evening with the £16million defender constantly worried by the forward. And the England Under-21 international was inches away from connecting with Dorrans’ searching cross. Myhill beat away Di Maria’s drive on 31 minutes as United tried to up the tempo but they continued to be undone by their own wastefulness in the final third. But they were almost handed a lifeline seven minutes before the break when Craig Dawson was forced to block Van Persie’s shot after the striker robbed Joleon Lescott in the area. It was the only time the Baggies had switched off and United were firmly on the back foot going into the second half. Van Gaal reacted by replacing Ander Herrera with Fellaini and the midfielder made an instant impact on 47 minutes. He collected Di Maria’s hanging cross after out-muscling Lescott before thundering a right-footed effort high beyond Myhill from 15 yards. It changed the complexion of the game with United pressing and Myhill saved Di Maria’s tame effort. But while the visitors were buoyant Albion held firm and regained the lead on 66 minutes. It was another poor goal to concede from United as Rafael played Berahino onside as he broke onto Brunt’s defence-splitting pass and coolly curled into the bottom corner. United’s rally began when Van Persie slammed an 18-yard volley onto the base of the post and Januzaj blazed the rebound over. Rojo nodded well wide with nine minutes left but Blind secured a point with three minutes left when he bent the ball into the bottom corner from 18 yards after Rafael’s cross was only half cleared. It had cancelled out Stephane Sessegnon’s wonderful opener at The Hawthorns and the Baggies, who move up to 14th in the Barclays Premier League, were good value for a point. The result means United boss Louis van Gaal has still not won away from Old Trafford with his side sixth in the table. Ben Foster missed out for West Brom after suffering a calf injury in training and was replaced by Boaz Myhill in the Baggies goal. Chris Brunt shrugged off a groin injury to start and Victor Anichebe was on the bench despite battling a hernia problem. Andre Wisdom returned after being ineligible to face parent club Liverpool last time out meaning Cristian Gamboa dropped to the bench. Adnan Janujaz made his first start of the season for United with Radamel Falcao left on the bench. Phil Jones returned as Paddy McNair struggled with a hamstring problem along with fellow injury victim Antonio Valencia. Michael Carrick, yet to make an appearance this season, made the bench as he stepped up his recovery from ankle ligament damage. Daley Blind rescued a late point for Manchester United as they were held to a 2-2 draw at West Brom.last_img read more