Category Archives: fofabvlic

Faculty member awarded grant to transcribe archives collection

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first_img Read Full Story Old habits may die hard, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. David Gordon Lyon, founder of Harvard’s Semitic Museum, Hollis Professor of Divinity and Hancock Professor of Hebrew and other Oriental Languages began keeping a diary in 1870 as an undergraduate and continued throughout the rest of his life. The 38 notebooks Lyon filled capture world events and 40 years of life at Harvard through a unique and personal lens.This rich record, held by the Harvard University Archives, will be soon be more accessible to researchers thanks to a grant to transcribe them from the Lasky/Barajas Dean’s Innovation Fund for Digital and Humanities. The grant was to Professor Peter Der Manuelian, director of the Harvard Semitic Museum, by Faculty of Arts & Sciences Curriculum Services.Lyon’s brief, daily entries document his lectures, research and activities at Harvard as well as his prayers. In 1912, Lyon jotted down a reminder to write a note of condolence to the family of a victim of the Titanic disaster. In 1918, he chronicled local reaction to the end of World War I; Lyon celebrated by going “to the movies,” possibly newsreels.Ephemerae were tucked in the pages — tickets, invoices and colorful birthday cards and Valentines from his wife. “He used them kind of like wallets,” explained Robin McElheny, associate university archivist for collections and public services.last_img read more

Triple Threat.

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first_img “Farmers are being hit with a triple whammy of dry weather, low crop prices and extremely high fuel costs,” said Bill Thomas, a University of Georgia Extension Service economist. “The drier it is,” Thomas said, “the more farmers have to run the diesel engines on their irrigation systems. And they will try to pass that cost on to consumers.” As farmers make the first turn into the growing season, even after last week’s rain, the outlook isn’t good, says state climatologist David Stooksbury. “This week’s rain will be good for early growth and germination for those crops that were already in the field,” he said. “And, psychologically, it was a nice rain — the type of rain we need to have.” Most areas of the state got 1.5 to 2 inches. However, Georgia is still below normal for the year. Most places are still below normal for the month.Little Rain, Not Enough Growers bet on March, historically Georgia’s wettest month, to bring the moisture needed for the prime planting season. “For April, there is an increased probability for below-normal precipitation for the state,” Stooksbury said. “That holds true for May and June. The temperatures are also expected to be above normal.” The combination of above-normal temperatures and below-normal rain spells real trouble for farmers. “It’s already hot in Georgia, but this year it will be hotter than normal,” Stooksbury warned. “And that will increase soil-moisture loss. We have had so little rain that we don’t have a large reserve of soil moisture.” Hot and Dry Expect those high temperatures to last all summer, but in the final turn toward harvest, Georgia might see some wet weather. “There is indication that, as we go into late summer and early fall, south Georgia will have an increased probability of above-normal precipitation,” Stooksbury said. “But by then, it might be too late.” Dry weather and high fuel prices cost farmers more to run tractors, planters and irrigators. And transportation costs will add even more to food prices. But the main impact on food prices is the weather, according to a report from the U.S. Economic Research Service’s 2000 Agricultural Outlook Forum last month.Prices Rise Forecasts of more dry weather are just the beginning of Georgia farmers’ problems. And the triple threat facing them could drive up grocery prices. The report predicted that the prices of fresh fruits and vegetables will rise 2 percent to 3 percent this year. The same is true for most processed fruits and vegetables. “If fresh sweet corn goes up, the price has to be passed on to consumers,” Thomas said, “because there’s no alternative we can import. If the prices of other crops like grains go up, we will ship supplies in from other countries.” How much of a crop U.S. farmers put in the ground will affect the price of the product they harvest. “A lot of crops are up and down nationwide, as far as planting acres this year,” Thomas said. Acreage increases in snap beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, sweet corn and spinach should more than offset declines in celery, eggplant and tomatoes. Spinach, cauliflower and sweet corn had the largest acreage increases, while eggplant and tomatoes showed the largest decreases. Broccoli, lettuce and bell peppers remain steady. Market prices can fluctuate even more in the harvest home stretch, depending on how high fuel prices climb and how low moisture levels drop. Photo: Peggy Greb, USDA-ARS Photo: S. Bauer, USDA-ARSlast_img read more

American Electric Power takes another swing at adding Midwestern wind power capacity

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first_imgAmerican Electric Power takes another swing at adding Midwestern wind power capacity FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享E&E News ($):Two units of American Electric Power Co. announced requests for wind energy proposals yesterday, less than six months after the company decided to cancel its $4.5 billion Wind Catcher project.The new approach reflects continued interest in wind at AEP’s Southwestern Electric Power Co. (SWEPCO) and Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO), despite Texas regulators’ rejection of a Wind Catcher application last year.That AEP project called for acquiring a 2,000-megawatt wind farm that Invenergy LLC had been working on in Oklahoma, with about 1,400 MW slated for SWEPCO and 600 MW linked to PSO. The plan also envisioned a 765-kilovolt power line, which would have run hundreds of miles in Oklahoma.Now, SWEPCO is requesting proposals for as much as 1,200 MW of wind energy that would be in commercial operation by Dec. 15, 2021. The plans must have a nameplate rating of at least 100 MW and are due March 1, SWEPCO said. The company said it’s looking to acquire new or existing projects that qualify for at least 80 percent of a federal production tax credit.Another requirement, according to SWEPCO, is that projects will need to be interconnected to the Southwest Power Pool grid in Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas or Oklahoma. The new approach to wind expansion is different from Wind Catcher in part because it involves a competitive process.PSO, which operates in parts of Oklahoma, said yesterday that it’s also seeking proposals for wind resources that would be operating commercially by late 2021. Stan Whiteford, a PSO spokesman, said the amount of wind pursued by the company will depend on what the responses show and could be in the hundreds of megawatts. Whiteford said PSO already has more than 1,100 MW of wind under contract through power purchase deals.More ($): AEP looks again to wind after $4.5B plan flopslast_img read more

Ah, OK Republicans, NOW I Get It!

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Ok, so let me get this straight.“Obamacare” is the law. President Obama was re-elected, with everyone knowing he was going to keep Obamacare in place, so more people are OK with it than not.Even many of those who aren’t totally OK with it, just want it tweaked a bit.The Supreme Court has said the law is constitutional.BUT, House Republicans say “Hey, wait a minute. We were elected too, and our constituents have said they want us to take Obamacare OUT. So we are sticking to our guns, and we found a way to get you Democrats to listen to what OUR constituents say, and if you don’t want to budge, and the government shuts down, well, that’s on you. We’re doing our DUTY to OUR constituents who have said NO to Obamacare.”I can understand that. Even sounds righteous.Until you realize, that THESE are some of the constituents you speak of.last_img read more

Addressing issues with dual interface transaction declines

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first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Insert to pay or tap to pay. Dual interface cards allow both. For many consumers, the tap to pay option feels faster, mirroring the speed of mobile transactions. Issuing dual interface cards offers community financial institutions (FIs) a new option to meet consumer demand for perceptibly faster transactions.Recently, however, TMG has noticed some nuances with dual interface technology that may impact FIs. Specifically, at certain merchant locations, some transactions are showing up as entry mode 91, or magnetic stripe data, instead of dual interface EMV transactions. When these transactions are passed to processors for validation, the magnetic stripe CVV is read rather than the dynamic CVV, therefore the transactions are declined. continue reading »last_img read more

New York State Trooper and 3 others injured in 2-county chase

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first_imgAdditionally, the two occupants in the vehicle involved, Lucas S. Pierce ad Matthew B. Basos, both from Owego, have also been treated and released from Wilson Hospital. Stay with 12 News on-air and online as we continue to follow this developing story. The trooper and the three people in the car were taken to UHS Wilson. VESTAL (WBNG) — New York State Police say they have charged Christian J. Buck, the driver in Friday night’s crash, after he was released from Wilson Medical Center on Sunday. —————————————————————————————————————– Buck is scheduled to appear in Tioga County Court to answer that charge on August 6. VESTAL (WBNG) – New York State Police are investigating a two-county chase that began in Tioga County Friday night just before 9 p.m. and ended in a crash on the Vestal Parkway. UPDATE 3:05 p.m.: The chase came to an end in front of the Mirabito gas station on the Vestal Parkway near Clayton Avenue. New York State Police are now investigating. Authorities said Buck was issued an appearance ticket for one count of Unlawfully Fleeing an Officer in Motor Vehicle. Buck has been charged with: —————————————————————————————————————– VESTAL (WBNG) — New York State Police say the trooper involved in Friday night’s crash on the Vestal parkway has been treated and released from Lourdes Hospital. New York State Police told 12 News Friday night the crash involved a trooper’s car and the vehicle involved in the pursuit. Reckless Endangerment in the first degree, Class D FelonyAggravated Unlicensed Operation in the first degree, Class E FelonyDriving While Ability Impaired by Drugs, MisdemeanorUnlawfully Fleeing an Officer in a Motor Vehicle (two counts) Class A MisdemeanorReckless Driving, Misdemeanor Authorities say charges are pending. State Police said Christian J. Buck of Port Crane, the driver of the vehicle, was transported to Wilson Hospital where he was admitted overnight for observation. UPDATE 3:33 p.m.: There’s no word on anyone’s identities or the extent of their injuries. Police say they received a complaint about a suspicious vehicle and shortly afterwards, a trooper on Route 17 in Owego spotted the car and tried to pull the driver over after reportedly watching them commit several vehicle and traffic infractions.last_img read more

Cutler Flea Market returns to Broome County

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first_imgThe market was held at the Broome County Regional Farmer’s Market, and instead of fresh fruits and veggies, antiques were on sale. White spoke highly of her experience. Kristin White is the owner of ChickenLibrarian, and Sunday marked the first time she had the chance to sell her lip balms, hand sanitizers, air fresheners, and more. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – On Sunday, the Cutler Flea Market returned to Broome County. Like White, Rooney also feels comfortable with the safety measures taken by the market. Both vendors agree they have to do what they can to stay safe because an event like the cutler flea market is vital for their businesses. “Everybody is being really good, and wearing their masks and keeping their distance and using hand sanitizer,” she said. “We’re taking every precaution that we can to prevent something like that from happening here, especially when we have our products out like this.” Rooney said. “It’s been really good, it’s beautiful, everyone has been really nice,” she said. Another vendor, Ellie Rooney, is a flea market veteran, and a co-owner of the boutique bake shop, De Colores Cookies y Mas. One week ago, a customer tested positive for COVID-19 at the Vestal farmer’s market. But White said she wasn’t worried about being in a similar atmosphere.last_img read more

Court overturns Boston Marathon bomber’s death sentence

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first_imgTsarnaev was convicted on 30 charges, including conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction Tsarnaev’s lawyers had argued that intense media coverage had made it impossible to have a fair trial in Boston. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Friday overturned the death sentence of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. The three-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston issued the decision more than six months after arguments were heard in the case. The April 15, 2013, attack killed three people and injured more than 260 others. last_img

Longevity bigger risk than rates to corporate DB, says Fitch

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first_imgThe agency said yields for corporate bonds used in International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) would eventually rise and reduce liabilities on that front.“It would take discount rates to move from the current 3.5% to 4.7% to wipe out the current average deficit of £2.7bn based on our sample of UK corporates,” it said.“Low rates have been the main factor behind big increases in corporate pension deficits in the UK and Germany.“But interest rates are expected to increase in the medium term, which will eventually at least partially reverse the deteriorating deficits.“An increase in longevity beyond what has already been factored into expected pension obligations, however, would lead to an increase in deficits and would be highly unlikely to be reversed.“Historically, pension schemes have tended to underestimate these improvements, suggesting their longevity assumptions may have to be revised up,” Fitch’s report added.Fitch said there were few significant changes in longevity assumptions used in company pension scheme accounting in 2014 compared to 2013.The ratings agency said expected increases in interest rates and longevity could offset each other, with its impact on funding depending on the timing of the change, the discount rate and investment returns.“If the longevity assumption improves further in future – the pension deficits will follow suit,” it added. Fitch Ratings has warned German and UK companies that defined benefit (DB) scheme deficits are more susceptible to longevity than low interest rates.The ratings agency said that while a fall in discount rates used by DB schemes had recently driven up liabilities, its impact was not a serious as long-term increases in longevity.It calculated that in 19 UK and 14 German listed companies analysed, deficits rose 38% and 44%, respectively, over the course of 2014 – in both cases driven by low interest rates.However, for the UK schemes, Fitch suggested an increase in longevity assumptions by two years would immediately add £1.3bn, or 9.2%, to average deficits in its sample – and would be very unlikely to reverse.last_img read more

Janwillem Bouma elected as chair of PensionsEurope

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first_imgJoanne Segars has stepped down as chair of PensionsEurope after three years in the role, to be succeeded by Janwillem Bouma.Bouma, managing director of Shell’s Dutch pension fund, will begin his term immediately.A member of the Dutch Pension Federation’s board, Bouma only joined PensionsEurope’s board earlier this year following the departure of Benne van Popta.Bouma also succeeded Van Popta as a member of the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority’s pensions stakeholder group. Bouma joined Shell in 1987 and has worked in various areas of finance for the business since then.He served as CFO at Shell Sulphur until 2010, when he was named managing director of Shell’s defined benefit fund.In 2013, he became executive director of its new defined contribution arrangement.He also sits on the board of the ANWB Pension Fund, the scheme for employees of the Dutch automotive association.Bouma paid tribute to Segars’s three years as chair, which saw her succeed Patrick Burke as chair of the European Federation of Retirement Provision, later rebranded as PensionsEurope, and laid out his vision for his time as chair.“Working together with the European institutions to develop practical solutions for the challenges we face in pensions, I will do my utmost to ensure our voice is heard by the European institutions and to promote good pensions for the citizens of Europe,” Bouma said.“The review of the IORP Directive will be essential, but we will also be working on cross-border issues and our role in providing long-term investments in this uncertain economic environment.”The association’s general assembly also re-elected Pierre Bollon of France’s AFG and Jerry Moriarty of the Irish Association of Pension Funds as its vice-chairs.Segars will remain a member of the board in her capacity as chief executive of the UK’s Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association.PensionsEurope also welcomed two new member associations, the Bulgarian Association of Supplementary Pension Security Companies (BASPSC) and the Lithuanian Investment and Pension Funds Association (LIPFA). BASPSC represents nine member companies worth €4.5bn, while LIPFA represents the interests of companies in Lithuania’s decade-old second pillar, now worth €2bn.Matti Leppälä, PensionsEurope’s director general, stressed the importance of further associations joining from Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries.He said: “It is important we grow stronger in the CEE region, and we hope others will follow the Bulgarian and Lithuanian example, so their voice can be heard at EU level too.”last_img read more