Category Archives: nyivq

‘GST revenue at an all-time low’

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first_imgThe revenue from the Goods and Services Tax has slipped by over ₹2,500 crore — to a 19-month low in September — and is showing no signs of recovery due to a massive tax fraud and overall “flaws in the system”, indicated West Bengal Finance and Industry Minister Amit Mitra in a letter to Union Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. Mr. Mitra wrote the letter on Monday.The GST revenue slipped from ₹94,442 crore in September 2018 to ₹91,916 crore in September, 2019 — a drop of ₹2,526 crore. Highlighting the drop, Mr. Mitra argued that this “probably is the first time that monthly collections have been at an all-time low”. This collection, Mr. Mitra noted, is “even lower than the collection for July 2017, which was ₹92,283 crore”.“Though it has picked up slightly in October with ₹95,380 crore, it is still 5.29% below the collection of October 2018 which was ₹1,00,710 crore,” Mr. Mitra said. He underscored that despite his repeated warnings about “GST fraud and the flaws in the system… no discussion was held on this issue in the last GST Council meeting”. In his two-page letter, Mr. Mitra pointed at the problem of fake input tax credit that manufacturers and in turn dealers are entitled to for paying input taxes. He indicated that a network of fake ITC was snowballing in the country and yet “we continue to work in silos”.“A few days ago, Odisha SGST authorities detected a fraud worth ₹138 crore”, while in September searches carried out “in 336 locations across 15 States detected fake ITC worth ₹740 crore”. One person in Mumbai with credit of ₹93 crore and another person in a case worth ₹127 crore were arrested since September, Mr. Mitra noted. “Each and every State and the Central GST authorities are continually detecting fake invoices and absentee registered tax payers,” he wrote.No task force Since fake ITC means a loss of tax as it is “not backed by transaction in goods or services in reality”, such leakages are contributing to the “falling revenue trend,” Mr. Mitra noted. He regretted that “no task force [was] set up” to deal with the fraud as suggested by him earlier.last_img read more

McGregor has boxing skill, but enough to beat Mayweather?

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first_imgLIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games Jones facing discipline, questions after failed drug test WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief McGregor’s ability to pull off perhaps the most improbable upset in sports history likely rests on his chances to land not just one punch, but repeated combinations of blows on Mayweather, who has shown a decent chin on the few occasions he has been hit in the past decade.If McGregor can’t consistently hit Mayweather — and nobody has consistently connected against Money May in over a decade — he can at least avoid embarrassment by not getting knocked out — and there is no doubt McGregor can take a punch. His sparring partners have spoken of his tough chin, and it was evident last year in his two UFC brawls with Nate Diaz. Their second bout in August 2016 devolved into a brutal standup fight that left both men bloodied and bruised.McGregor’s disregard for defense in that bout — or his inability to defend himself from repeated head blows — could be decisive when facing Mayweather, who might be the most precise puncher in the sport. McGregor claims he has worked on defense during his training camp, but his predictions for the fight invariably return to his belief in his own power.No matter what happens to McGregor at T-Mobile Arena, he will rely on the skills he first learned at the Crumlin Boxing Club, where his mother Mags still works out. The club will be full of his fans when it screens the fight at about 5 a.m. Sunday morning.“You will see the culmination of everything I’ve learned and studied,” McGregor said. “A great many people helped to get me to what you will see this weekend.” “No fighter can train for what I bring into the ring or into the octagon,” McGregor said. “I am too skilled. I am too diverse. My movement is too much for them. All of these men will fall.”But for McGregor to make Mayweather fall, he’ll either need to land an astonishing home-run punch, or he’ll have to show more creativity and sustained boxing skill than MMA usually demands.While McGregor’s versatility and smarts have made him the UFC’s biggest star, he can use only one discipline against Mayweather — and no serious people outside McGregor’s camp doubt Mayweather has more boxing skill. Still, McGregor has devoted himself to boxing in recent weeks, bringing in former champ Paulie Malignaggi among his many sparring partners and recruiting Joe Cortez, the veteran boxing referee, to instruct him on the finer points of etiquette.“Fighting in Vegas, I just don’t see how Conor outpoints him (for a decision),” UFC President Dana White said. “Conor is going to get in there to rough him up and try to knock him out.”White and McGregor’s other fervent backers believe in his one-punch knockout power, which he showed most memorably in dethroning longtime UFC champion Jose Aldo. But one-punch knockouts are rare in 8-ounce boxing gloves, which diffuse the impact of a blow more than tiny UFC gloves.ADVERTISEMENT View comments LATEST STORIES Conor McGregor speaks during news conference Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017, in Las Vegas. McGregor is scheduled to fight Floyd Mayweather Jr. in a boxing match Saturday in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)LAS VEGAS, Nevada—Before Conor McGregor had even heard of mixed martial arts, he wanted to be a boxer. He first stepped into Crumlin Boxing Club nearly 20 years ago in muddy football boots and started punching a heavy bag.McGregor returned constantly for the next seven years, determined to become tough enough to dissuade bullies in his Dublin neighborhood. He competed in amateur boxing matches against opponents of all sizes and shapes over the years, developing tenacity and power.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Manny Pacquiao on Floyd Mayweather: Let him enjoy retirement PLAY LIST 00:44Manny Pacquiao on Floyd Mayweather: Let him enjoy retirement00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Read Next LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses “There were no weight rules, no limitations on who you could fight,” McGregor recalled Wednesday. “We would just have an opponent assigned to us. That was always the joke: Everybody at the Crumlin Boxing Club had to fight heavyweights, no matter what size you are. But it was a good lesson. You must be prepared for any eventuality. You must be ready to fight. That’s how I was brought into this game.”McGregor is on top of the fight game this week before his Saturday showdown with Floyd Mayweather (49-0), the most accomplished boxer of his generation. McGregor, a former plumber who has never had a professional boxing match, will make roughly $100 million for stepping into the ring for the first time in the spectacle of the summer.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAnd though McGregor moved into MMA training in his teens and eventually rose to win two UFC belts, he is no boxing neophyte. While he has other strengths, McGregor’s MMA career has been built in large part on his boxing-bred punching power, which is considered exceptional by his sport’s standards.Oh, and he also doesn’t lack confidence, which is no small thing when facing odds as daunting as McGregor’s chances against Mayweather. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

‘Spot-fixing speculation against OZ created by Indian media’

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first_imgGeorge Bush and Osama bin Laden having dinner with Elvis Presley is a greater possibility than Australian cricketers being involved in spot-fixing, says pacer Stuart Clark, who feels the speculation was an attempt by the Indian media to sabotage their World Cup campaign.”I do not believe for one minute that any Australian player is involved in spot-fixing – there is more chance of George Bush and Osama bin Laden having dinner with Elvis at Gracelands. I do believe, however, that this is an unwanted distraction created by the Indian media to try and throw the Australians off their game,” Clark wrote in a column for the ‘Sydney Morning Herald’.There were reports that Australia’s slow batting in the match against Zimbabwe was investigated by the ICC’s anti-corruption unit. Clark said the ICC only fuelled the speculation by giving just a “no comments” response.”Maybe this is the conspiracy theorist coming out in me, but, having toured that part of the world, I understand how much winning the World Cup means not only to the Indian team but to the nation,” he said.”It was pleasing to see Australia’s team manager, Steve Bernard, come out and rubbish these claims but disappointing to hear the ICC provide an inadequate response by offering only a ‘no comment’.”Is it asking for too much for the ICC to offer a meaningful comment? Is it too much to ask that the game be presided over by a governing body that is capable of acting professionally?” he added.advertisementlast_img read more

India vs Oman friendly to be behind closed doors for ‘tactical’ reasons

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first_imgNot willing to reveal their tactics, India and Oman will play behind closed doors their final international friendly before the AFC Asian Cup, in Abu Dhabi on Thursday.A day prior to the match at the Baniyas Stadium, India’s head coach Stephen Constantine stressed they “haven’t come here expecting to play easy games”.The match is part of Blue Tigers’ preparation for the forthcoming Asian Cup. Both the head coaches have decided on playing behind closed doors, the result of which there won’t be any telecast of the match and the crowd and media will be missing from the stands.India begin their campaign in the Asian Cup against Thailand on January 6.Commenting on the match against Oman, Constantine stated: “It’s going to be extremely hard. We have come here to play the big boys of Asia. We played against the likes of Jordan, China. We need to play these sort of games to prepare in the best possible fashion.”Oman are currently ranked 82 in the FIFA rankings, while India are at 97. India last played Oman in the FIFA World Cup Russia 2018 qualifiers twice, with Oman winning on both occasions.”We were very unlucky to lose the first leg in Bengaluru,” Constantine reflected. “That was our first group stage game in the qualifiers. But we are a much improved side now, and much younger.”Central midfielder Pronay Halder, who wasn’t part of the squad in the first-leg in Bengaluru complemented his coach, saying “we are a much matured side now”.advertisement”We have matured a lot since then. Our organisation on the field is much better compared to what we were in 2015,” he opined.India have been the first team to land in Abu Dhabi for the Asian Cup.”The facilities have been superb and it has been going on according to the plan so far. We have done our homework as well,” Constantine insisted.In the continental showpiece, India are looking to improve on their showing from the last time they took part in the tournament, in the 2011 edition, when they suffered three heavy defeats for a group stage-exit.India’s 13-match unbeaten run under Constantine has given them hope of a better outing this time around, coming into the event not long after scaling their second-best ranking in the FIFA chart.Also Read | Sunil Chhetri and I have a telepathic understanding on the pitch, says Jeje LalpekhluaAlso Read | Gouramangi Singh feels hosts UAE will be India’s toughest matchlast_img read more

French Open prize money raised by 8 per cent, new court inaugurated

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first_imgFrench Open prize money raised by 8 per cent, new court inauguratedThe winners of the men’s and women’s singles will each receive 2.3 million euros ($2.6 million), up 4.55 per cent from last year.advertisement Next Indo-Asian News Service ParisMarch 22, 2019UPDATED: March 22, 2019 11:44 IST Opening ceremony of the new court Simonne Mathieu at Roland Garros stadium (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSPrize money will jump the most for men and women who are ousted in the qualifying stageWinners of the men’s and women’s singles will each receive 2.3 million eurosTournament organisers also inaugurated a new 5,000-seat courtFrench Open organisers have announced an eight per cent increase in the total prize money to 42.6 million euros ($48.35 million) and also inaugurated a new court that is the famed Grand Slam tennis tournament’s third-biggest.Prize money will jump the most for men and women who are ousted in the qualifying stage or who lose in the first round, with the latter now set to earn 46,000 euros ($52,333) apiece, an increase of 15 per cent over last year, Efe news reported on Friday.The winners of the men’s and women’s singles will each receive 2.3 million euros ($2.6 million), up 4.55 per cent from last year, while the singles finalists will earn 1.18 million euros, an increase of 5.36 per cent.On Thursday, tournament organisers also inaugurated a new 5,000-seat court that is the first piece of a renovation project launched in 2018 at tennis’ clay-court Grand Slam.Known as Court Simonne Mathieu, it is named after a star French player of the 1920s and 1930s who won two Roland Garros women’s singles titles (when the tournament was known as the French Championships). Mathieu (1908-1980) also was a runner-up at that tournament on six occasions and became a French resistance fighter during World War II.The new court is the third-biggest at Stade Roland Garros after Court Philippe Chatrier (the main stadium) and Court Suzanne Lenglen.For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow French OpenFollow Roland GarrosFollow French ChampionshipsFollow Simonne MathieuFollow Court Simonne Mathieulast_img read more

Ocho Rios Police gets Standby Generator

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first_img The Ocho Rios police station now has a new standby generator, which will provide the facility with backup power when the grid goes down. Story Highlights Minister of National Security, Hon. Robert Montague, who officially handed over the equipment on Thursday (Aug. 31), explained that the generator “has an automatic transfer switch so that as soon as light goes it switches on and switches everything on without anybody doing anything.” The Ocho Rios police station now has a new standby generator, which will provide the facility with backup power when the grid goes down.The cost of the generator, including installation, is approximately $7.3 million.Minister of National Security, Hon. Robert Montague, who officially handed over the equipment on Thursday (Aug. 31), explained that the generator “has an automatic transfer switch so that as soon as light goes it switches on and switches everything on without anybody doing anything.”“As soon as light comes back it instantly flips back over to the public grid. We have also provided a base where we have erected a fence around the generator. We have also done some electrical installation between the generator and the building, ensuring that everything is up and running,” he noted further.Minister Montague said the standby generator is a“much-needed investment” and will enhance the operations of the police, which have been without such service for more than two and a half years.“Because Ocho Rios produces so much for the economy of Jamaica, we cannot afford for the men and women, who are serving the citizens here to be without (electricity)  service at any time. This administration and this Minister take the welfare of our police officers very seriously,” he pointed out.He noted that Ocho Rios is one of five towns in the country that has closed circuit television (CCTV) coverage and “we want to make sure that at all times the CCTV cameras are up.”“We have a total of 37 cameras in Ocho Rios and they have been a great help to the police officers in detecting and preventing crime. Only recently, the cameras detected somebody trying to break into a car and the police was able to respond and prevent that,” he said.Meanwhile, Minister Montague informed that police stations are to receive $250,000 for routine maintenance.“It is to fix the bathroom, to fix the kitchen, to help with the electrical installation, to fix a window,” he noted.“What we have done is to ask the head of every station to do a project and to involve the community and where that project has to be signed off by the consultative committee, which is chaired by the Custos. I am pleased to inform that every police station in St. Ann has submitted their project to do some type of work,” he said.As it relates to the provision of protective equipment, he pointed out that 3, 500 ballistic vests have been procured and deployed.“I remember about nearly two months ago when the police had a confrontation with the most wanted man in Westmoreland and where the life of one of our young constables was saved by the ballistic vest,” he informed.The Minister also commended the Ocho Rios police for the quick action in apprehending escapees from the lock-up several weeks ago. The cost of the generator, including installation, is approximately $7.3 million.last_img read more

Flat and fabulous Vancouver breast cancer survivor prepares to model lingerie at

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first_imgModels walks the runway for the AnaOno Intimates X Cancerland show at New York Fashion Week in February 2017. (Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images) Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter Dianne Wraight is part of a legion of women who call themselves “flat and fabulous.”This week, many of them will be making their modelling debuts at New York Fashion Week.They’ll be sporting designs by AnaOno, which specializes in lingerie for women who have had mastectomies, breast reconstruction or breast surgery.center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement “I’m trying to figure it out. I don’t really wear heels,” Wraight told Gloria Macarenko, host of CBC’s On the Coast.Dianne Wraight is part of a legion of women who call themselves “flat and fabulous.”This week, many of them will be making their modelling debuts at New York Fashion Week.They’ll be sporting designs by AnaOno, which specializes in lingerie for women who have had mastectomies, breast reconstruction or breast surgery.“I’m trying to figure it out. I don’t really wear heels,” Wraight told Gloria Macarenko, host of CBC’s On the Coast.last_img read more

French premier to meet with protesters amid anger over taxes

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first_imgPARIS — French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe will meet with some protesters’ representatives in an effort to calm the tensions over rising taxes, a first since the movement started two weeks ago.The government’s move on Friday comes amid calls for a new actions Saturday across France, including on the Champs-Elysees in Paris, where a protest last weekend degenerated into violence.Motorists protesting against a fuel tax hike have been joined since by farmers, white-collar workers, retirees and others in the “yellow jackets” movement that now involves a broad range of demands related to the country’s high cost of living.Their list of demands include tax cuts, the creation of a citizens’ assembly, state-funded subsidies to help companies increase hiring, higher pensions and a higher national minimum salary.Sylvie Corbet, The Associated Presslast_img read more

UNICEF urges Côte dIvoire to hold annual countrywide school exams

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“Cancelling examinations creates despair, fear and despondency about the future, and quite simply robs children of a year of hard work at school,” said Gianni Murzi, UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Regional Director.Some 58,000 children are negatively affected by the postponement of exams in northern Côte d’Ivoire, according to the UNICEF. Over the past few months, UN agencies have worked with their partners to mobilize the financial, logistical and human resources necessary to ensure the return of children to school and the holding of exams throughout the country.Now UNICEF says the postponement of school exams in the north threatens not only children’s educational development, but also their physical safety since thousands of children who should be concentrating on exams are out on the streets. read more

In UN court Argentina sues Uruguay over pulp plant on shared river

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In its application to the International Court of Justice (ICJ), made public on Thursday, Argentina charges the Government of Uruguay with having, unilaterally authorized the construction of a pulp mill near the town of Fray Bentos in October 2003 on the River Uruguay, “without complying with the obligatory prior notification and consultation procedure” provided for by the 1975 statute. The country claims that Uruguay has “aggravated the dispute” by subsequently authorizing the construction in the same area of a second pulp mill along with port facilities. It maintains that the mills will “damage the environment of the River Uruguay and its catchment zone,” affecting over 300,000 residents who have expressed concerned over the “significant risks of pollution of the river, deterioration of biodiversity, harmful effects on health and damage to fisheries resources,” and the “extremely serious consequences for tourism and other economic interests.”According to the ICJ, the 1975 Statute of the River Uruguay governs “the conservation, utilization and exploitation of natural resources and the prevention of pollution” and establishes an Administrative Commission of the River Uruguay, which has functions of regulation and co-ordination.Argentina is asking the court to affirm Uruguay’s obligations to abide by their mutual pact and award damages for its breach. Pending a final decision, it requests an order for Uruguay to immediately halt constructions of the mills and cooperate with Argentina on regulating use of the river. read more

Komatsus new Intelligent Machine Control helps overcome skills shortages

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first_imgKomatsu says its new Intelligent Machine Control (iMC) technology provides a solution to one of the major challenges facing the construction industry: the lack of skilled operators at a time when clients are demanding ever-higher levels of precision combined with increased productivity. Currently available across dozer and excavator models, iMC “has already shown its ability to deliver significant improvements in efficiency and productivity for Australian contractors compared with conventional construction processes.”Komatsu iMC is designed to let operators focus on moving material efficiently – from bulk excavation to final trim – without having to worry about over-excavation or damaging the target surface – vastly speeding up site earthworks, while delivering greater precision and accuracy. Currently covering a range of four dozers and one excavator, each model in Komatsu’s iMC range incorporates as standard a factory-installed fully integrated 3D GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) machine control system.Komatsu iMC is part of the company’s SmartConstruction concept, which brings together a wide range of technology solutions, including drones and remote site management, to deliver more efficient, productive and cost efficient construction processes.According to Aaron Marsh, Komatsu Australia’s Technology Solution Expert Team Manager, Smart Centre, major industry issues, including skills shortages, demands for increased construction site productivity, finite resources and project management pressures were key factors behind the development of iMC technology. “At Komatsu, we have a long history of introducing market-leading technology and innovation to the industries we serve,” he said. “Understanding the needs of our customers, we are constantly working towards enhancing and improving their productivity – including meeting the challenge of the ever-growing demand for skilled machine operators.”All machines in Komatsu’s current iMC line-up – covering the PC210LCi-10 excavator, and D61EXi-23, D65EXi-18, D85EXi-18 and D155AXi-8 dozers, share some common features.Automated blade and bucket control, from bulk excavation to final gradesIntegrated factory-installed Komatsu machine control system, with all components highly secure from damage, vandalism and theftMultiple automated dozing modes, with auto grade assist, auto stop control and minimum distance control for the excavator, ensuring jobs are finished faster, more accurately and with minimal reworkConventional “bolt-on” machine control components are replaced with fully integrated factory-installed GNSS antennas, enhanced inertial measuring unit (iMU+) and stroke sensing hydraulic cylinders, ensuring Komatsu reliability, durability and quality.Exclusive cab-top (dozer) and handrail mounted (excavator) GNSS antennas greatly reduce the risk of damage, theft or vandalism associated with conventional blade and counterweight mounted antennas and cables – while ensuring greater accuracy through more stable GNSS antenna positioningChassis-mounted enhanced inertial measuring unit (iMU+) measures machine pitch and roll to enable precision work equipment control, even when working on slopes.Robust stroke-sensing hydraulic cylinders use proven sensor technologies for accurate finish grade performance, allowing the iMC system to constantly track the angle and location of the blade or bucket edge.Marsh said Komatsu’s integrated iMC technology delivered a wide range of benefits on construction sites. “IMC allows contractors to complete bulk dozing and excavation, along with grading and final trim operations faster and to closer tolerances, with fewer passes to achieve finish grades or excavation profiles. “It also allows far more efficient machine use and less rework – just dig or grade it once, then move on,” he said.“In addition, because all 3D design data is held within an iMC machine, we can greatly decrease times required for staking, survey and even final inspection, as well as allowing contractors to complete multiple tasks with one machine.” Other benefits, said Marsh, included lower machine operating costs and whole-of-life costs, better material yields, reduced fuel consumption, and greater machine availability and uptime. “And because an iMC-equipped machine means simple operation for all operators no matter what their experience levels, we get greatly improved operator performance,” he said. “All Komatsu iMC machines are capable of operating on multiple sites with all OEM type UHF or UHF digital base solutions, including network corrections through a network base solution.”last_img read more

Sitdown Sunday The 20 deadliest reads of 2013

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first_imgTHIS HAS BEEN the second full year of Sitdown Sundays, and we’ve seen our readership grow and grow.While it’s been a pleasure sourcing the great reads every week, it has also been a pleasure to read your comments and see what pieces have been your favourites.Here are our favourite longreads from each month of 2013, plus a further eight to give you even more reading while you’re relishing the Christmas holidays.All you have to do now is pick a comfy chair, sit back with a cuppa and savour the following reads.January1. The entertaining thiefAdam Green spends some time with Apollo Robbins, the pickpocket extraordinaire who has specialists studying what his methods reveal about the nature of human attention.(The New Yorker – approx 42 minutes reading time – 8561 words)Robbins works smoothly and invisibly, with a diffident charm that belies his talent for larceny. One senses that he would prosper on the other side of the law. “You have to ask yourself one question,” he often says as he holds up a wallet or a watch that he has just swiped. “Am I being paid enough to give it back?”February2. Stuck in timeMike Dash details the amazing story of a Russian family who lived in complete isolation for 40 years, never knowing that World War II had come and gone.(Smithsonian, approx 17 minutes reading time – 3417 words)The sight that greeted the geologists as they entered the cabin was like something from the middle ages. Jerry-built from whatever materials came to hand, the dwelling was not much more than a burrow – “a low, soot-blackened log kennel that was as cold as a cellar,” with a floor consisting of potato peel and pine-nut shells.March3. The unknown camps Eric Lichyblau profiles the work of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the thousands of previously unknown Nazi ghettos and camps that they’ve uncovered.(The New York Times, approx 5 minutes reading time – 1193 words)Auschwitz and a handful of other concentration camps have come to symbolize the Nazi killing machine in the public consciousness. Likewise, the Nazi system for imprisoning Jewish families in hometown ghettos has become associated with a single site — the Warsaw Ghetto, famous for the 1943 uprising.April4. Life onlineAmy O’Leary meets Jenna Marbles, a real-life, modern-day YouTube sensation whose videos are watched by millions.(The New York Times, approx 12 minutes reading time – 2522 words)On a bright Monday this winter, Ms. Mourey allowed the rare reporter inside her rented $1.1 million Santa Monica town house. The décor could be called contemporary teenage mess. Pizza boxes and a parking ticket littered the countertop. A fruit bowl held two bananas, turned solid black. Nerf darts spilled across the floor. A lonely dart clung to a high window, just out of reach. Any chaos in her daily life, however, sits neatly out of frame.May5. The Landsdowne Road Riot TheScore.ie staff tell the riveting story of what happened on 15 February 1995, when a riot broke out during an Ireland-England friendly at Landsdowne Road.(TheScore.ie, approx 16 minutes reading time – 3272 words)I was 12 at the time and was quite scared when it all kicked off. The hardest thing was knowing people in that section of the stadium and not knowing if they were okay or not. This was well before mobile phones were everywhere so it wasn’t until they got back home that you were able to find out if they were unhurt. (Vanity Fair– approx 43 minutes reading time, 8673 words)I asked Duncan if he knows what they thought of him when he first showed up, and he said, “They thought I was a curious, geeky kid. But many times, especially in that tunnel, I’d see someone in the distance and he’d see me, and we’d go in opposite directions in fear that the other person was either a cop or a crazy psycho killer. But most people in New York aren’t crazy psycho killers, homeless or not”December12. Girls and video gamesTracey Lien examines the gender stereotypes regarding toys, and particularly video games. Why are games aimed at girls pink and fluffy? And why do less girls play the games than boys?(Polygon – approx 31 minutes reading time, 6362 words)Most “girls’ sections,” if they exist, are lined with fitness titles and Ubisoft’s simplified career simulation series, Imagine, which lets players pretend they’re doctors, teachers, gymnasts and babysitters. As for the boys section — there isn’t one. Everything else is for boys. Nirvana. Pic: Starfile/All Action/EMPICS EntertainmentWe couldn’t leave out these eight other longreads:13. Fighting with wireClay Tarver meets Jason Everman, one-time member of seminal grunge band Nirvana. After getting kicked out, he went and did something a little unexpected – he became an elite member of the US Army Special Forces.(New York Times, approx 24 minutes reading time – 4,855 words)In Everman’s cabin, I saw medal after medal, including the coveted Combat Infantryman Badge. “Sounds kind of Boy Scouty,” he said. “But it’s actually something cool.” I saw photos of Everman in fatigues on a warship (“an antipiracy operation in Asia”). A shot of Everman with Donald Rumsfeld. Another with Gen Stanley A McChrystal. And that’s when it hit me. Jason Everman had finally become a rock star.14. The truth in betweenJay Caspian Kang writes about Reddit, and its role in wrongly ‘unmasking’ one of the Boston bombers – who turned out to actually be a young man who had taken his own life. He asks, should the hugely popular website be blamed for the spreading of a smear?(New York Times, approx 31 minutes reading time – 6365 words)Minutes after the world first saw the suspects’ photos, a user on Reddit, the online community that is also one of the largest Web sites in the world, posted side-by-side pictures comparing Sunil’s facial features with the face that would later be identified as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.15. Disappear hereKirstie Clements, the former editor of Australian Vogue, writes about a culture that leads to models eating tissues to stay full, and taking other drastic steps to remain ultra-thin.(The Guardian, approx 11 minutes reading time – 2242 words)When I first began dealing with models in the late 1980s we were generally drawing from a pool of local girls, who were naturally willowy and slim, had glowing skin, shiny hair and loads of energy. They ate lunch, sparingly for sure, but they ate. They were not skin and bones.16. Experiencing the ‘experiencers’ Ralph Blumenthal was invited to the annual meeting of “seemingly ordinary folk with extraordinary stories” – those who believed they had been abducted by aliens. These are the stories he was told.(Vanity Fair, approx 22 minutes reading time – 5,565 words)She had gathered them to compare experiences as, well, ‘experiencers,’ a term they prefer to ‘abductees,’ and to socialize free of stigma among peers. Cuvelier, an elegant and garrulous woman in her 70s, isn’t one of them. But she remembers as a teen in the 1940s hearing her father, Rear Admiral Donald James Ramsey, a World War II hero, muttering about strange flying craft that hovered and streaked off at unimaginable speed, and she’s been an avid ufologist ever since.17. Finding my mother in the AmazonWilliam Kremer tells the incredible story of David Good, whose father was from the US and mother was a member of an Amazonian tribe.(BBC News, approx 30 minutes reading time – 6042 words)It was as a graduate student of Chagnon’s that David Good’s father, Kenneth Good, first travelled to the Amazon in 1975. He travelled up the Orinoco past the Guajaribo Rapids, just as his son did 36 years later. He made his home in a little hut a short distance from the Hasupuweteri. The plan was to stay for 15 months of fieldwork, measuring the animal protein intake of all the village members.18. Nuclear truthWill Storr delves into the story of what happened to Alexander Litvinenko, a Russian dissident who was poisoned at the age of 43. Storr details what occurred after the poison was slipped into Litvinenko’s tea one afternoon, and why someone wanted to kill him.(Matter, approx 44 minutes reading time – 8893 words)That muscular grip alerted Henry to a potential problem in the diagnosis. How could Litvinenko be so physically strong? Why wasn’t his energy dissolving away? Goldfarb showed the full toxicology report to Henry. “It says here that the level of thallium is elevated, but only three times over the norm,” Henry said. “This is too low to account for the symptoms.”19. Always lookingMegan Nolan writes about her teenage years and the trials and tribulations of always wanting to be a slightly different version of herself.(Siren Magazine, approx 7 minutes reading time, 1445 words)When I looked at the book again recently, before writing this article, I immediately remembered the weak relief of being addressed as a fat, lazy slob. When you think these things about yourself repetitively, it comes as an almost exhilarating release when a third party confirms it for you. I hated the book and I hated myself for buying the book, and I especially hated that I had used profit reaped from the use of my brain to invest in this vanity.20. Football for lifeAmos Barshad writes about Israel’s football league. In a country where teams have political affiliations, the players that are signed can have an impact both on and off the pitch.(Grantland, approx 40 minutes reading time, 8040 words)On the last Saturday in January, with most of Israel shut down for Shabbat, Beitar Jerusalem FC – the only soccer team in the Israeli Premier League to have never signed an Arab player – announced that it had picked up two Muslim players from Chechnya: Dzhabrail Kadiyev, 19, and Zaur Sadayev, 23. The first response from fans was nonviolent but brutal: At the team’s next match, members of Beitar’s proudly racist ultras group La Familia unfurled a giant yellow banner in Teddy Stadium’s Eastern grandstand. It read, in a surreal echo of Nazi terminology: “Beitar Will Be Pure Forever.” The next response was arson.Want to share your favourite longreads from 2013? Tell us what they are in the comments.More: The best reads from every previous Sitdown Sunday >The Sports Pages – the best sports writing collected every week by TheScore.ie > Brittny Griner (right). Pic: AP Photo/Tony GutierrezJune6. Power and talentKate Fagan introduces us to the world’s most famous female basketball player, the 6ft 8 Brittney Griner.  The uber-talented 22-year-old doesn’t care about what others think of her – and is refreshingly frank about the fact she won’t change who she is for anybody. (ESPN,  approx 19 minutes reading time – 3951 words)“I am 100-percent happy,” she says. “When I was at Baylor, I wasn’t fully happy because I couldn’t be all the way out. It feels so good saying it: I am a strong, black lesbian woman. Every single time I say it, I feel so much better.”July7. Fighting fireJaime Joyce looks at the prison inmates who died fighting the Dude Fire in Arizona in 1990, and the families who struggled for justice in the wake of their deaths. What motivated the men to take on the challenge – and what happened when they could fight the fire no more?(The Big Round Table, approx 50 minutes reading time – 10,164 words)Heart attacks and burnover—in which fire overcomes a crew, forcing them to take cover in portable fire shelters until the flames pass—are among the most common causes of death, the former brought on by extreme physical exertion. But the inmates weren’t focused on that. They considered it a privilege to fight fire, and a spot on the crew was coveted.August8. Mind memoriesBonnie Wertheim meets David Hilfiker, who writes a blog about Alzheimer’s disease, which he was diagnosed with in September of last year. He chronicles the decline of his mental state.(Mashable, approx 26 minutes reading time – 2288 words)Kris felt a responsibility toward other Alzheimer’s sufferers: to change the conversation about the disease by putting a new face on it. “I did not realize what a stigma there was about this disease,” Kris tells me. “I’d known people who had this disease before, but I never really thought about it as anything other than a disease, until people started treating me differently. I knew I needed to educate people.”September9. Oral history of the Bank GuaranteeHugh O’Connell and a number of other TheJournal.ie staff contributed to an oral history of the Bank Guarantee, with the five-year anniversary being marked on 30 September this year. It’s the story behind the story.(TheJournal.ie, approx 36 minutes reading time – 7312 words)“I remember thinking: ‘This guy is shorting Anglo’. Again, he didn’t predict Anglo was going to go bust but he predicted the share price could fall by €10 and that’s what he was doing. I remember finding that quite frightening. This guy owed €400-500 million… to various banks, not just Anglo.” October10. Twitter warsNick Bilton looks at the story behind Twitter: the myths that surround how it was started, the fractious relationships that emerged as it became more successful, and how exactly it managed to become a start-up that made millions.(New York Times – 30 approx minutes reading time, 6188 words)In the Valley, these tales are called “the Creation Myth” because, while based on a true story, they exclude all the turmoil and occasional back stabbing that comes with founding a tech company. And while all origin stories contain some exaggerations, Twitter’s is cobbled together from an uncommon number of them.November11. Beneath New York’s streetsWilliam Langewiesche meets three men who work beneath New York’s streets: A subway worker, an engineer in charge of three huge projects, and an underground explorer.last_img read more

Survey shows differences of over €1000 between car insurance quotes

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first_imgSHOPPING AROUND FOR car insurance could save up to €1,335, a survey conducted by the National Consumer Agency (NCA) has revealed.The survey was the first undertaken since the implementation of the EU Gender Directive on 21st December 2012, and found that quotations for both genders were the same.Quotes were received from eight different insurers in Ireland, with a quote being obtained for each of eight different driver profiles.There was found to be a difference of up to €1,335 on third-party, fire and theft cover and up to €1,038 on fully comprehensive cover between the lowest and highest quotes for a 20-year-old student from Mayo with a full licence and driving experience of less than one year.Another driver profile (a 25-year-old teacher from Kilkenny with a full licence for three years) resulted in a difference of up to €595 on third-party, fire and theft cover and up to €625 on fully comprehensive cover between the lowest and highest quotes.The survey also showed that insurers, when providing a quote, did not treat penalty points in a uniform manner.While all eight insurers provided a quotation for a driver with two penalty points, only three were willing to provide a quote for the same driver with six penalty points.The director of research and policy at the NCA, Fergal O’Leary, said that the survey clearly showed that it was “worthwhile getting a number of quotes before buying or renewing motor insurance and we would strongly urge motorists to do so, especially younger drivers.”Read: Bad news, Scorpios: you’re the worst for making car insurance claims >last_img read more

Report argues 2004 Games boosted GDP

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Gross domestic product would have been 2.5 percent lower and employment would have been reduced by 44,000 jobs had the 2004 Olympic Games not been staged in Athens, according to the conclusions of a report by the Foundation for Economic and Industrial Research (IOBE) on the event’s impact on the Greek economy.IOBE stressed however that had the Olympic installations been better utilized after the Games, the benefit would have been even greater. It also noted that several projects funded by the Public Investments Program for the Games branded “Olympic projects” were in fact not.The report was commissioned last summer by the head of the Athens Olympics organizing committee, Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki, on the occasion of the event’s 10-year anniversary.Jacques Rogge, who was president of the International Olympic Committee when Greece hosted the Games, later admitted to Kathimerini that the 2004 Olympics contributed toward the swelling of the country’s debt.Source: Kathimerinilast_img read more

Totti Roma are gunning for Real Madrid

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first_imgAS Roma legend Francesco Totti reckons that the club “can’t wait” to take on Real Madrid, but warned them not to underestimate any of their opponentsThe Giallorossi have been drawn with the reigning champions, CSKA Moscow and Viktoria Plzen of Russia and the Czech Republic respectively.Speaking after the draw was made on Thursday night at Monaco, Totti revealed his excitement at seeing how Roma will do against a Real Madrid side without Cristiano Ronaldo.“I will make no declarations, as anything can happen in this tournament and we cannot underestimate anyone,” said the 41-year-old, according to ForzaItalianFootball.“Against Real Madrid, over the 180 minutes it will be exciting and I’m sure the players can’t wait.“I’m curious to see how they perform after a big summer.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“They lost something in Cristiano Ronaldo [to Juventus] but it is a team that always plays with heart and have a lot of champions in their squad.”Last season saw Roma reach the semi-final stage of the competition for the first time since 1984.Now Totti hopes they can go one better.“The final will be in Madrid and our challenge is to reach it.“We will try to achieve this because we have a competitive squad that is no weaker than last year.”last_img read more

New York and The New Yorker Dominate Ellie Awards Once Again

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first_imgNEW YORK—Despite honoring an industry in never-ending flux, much about the 2018 National Magazine Awards (or the Ellies, named for the accompanying elephant-shaped trophy) remained consistent with well-established tradition.Wine and cocktails flowed liberally, a TV news anchor reaffirmed the importance of journalism amid trying times (in between quips about the presence of Anna Wintour and Joanna Coles), and Adam Moss and David Remnick—editors of New York magazine and The New Yorker, respectively—wore thin the Cipriani ballroom’s carpeting during repeated trips to the stage to collect honors on behalf of their publications.What was glaringly different about this year’s 53rd annual Ellies was the omission of its most prestigious award: Magazine of the Year. The American Society of Magazine Editors, which administers the awards, indicated that the move was a reflection of the fact the Ellies are no longer confined to honoring print magazines alone. Replacing Magazine of the Year are two new categories: one for social media and one for digital innovation. “Now that every category is open to digital content, ASME believes that the goal of the Ellies—to recognize editorial excellence in a wide range of publications—is better served by focusing attention on the finalists and winners in the four General Excellence categories,” said ASME in a statement announcing the change.“It’s a bit like the Oscars deciding to stop giving out an award for Best Picture,” opined one publisher in attendance.What remains constant, however, is the Ellies’ commitment to honoring truly inspiring work from some of the best and brightest in the industry—not just in news and general interest reporting, but in sports, food, personal service, entertainment, lifestyle, criticism, fiction, design, and photography.The big winners this year, like in so many previous years (and not undeservedly so), were New York, which took home three wins among ten nominations, and The New Yorker, which also won three awards, among eight nominations.Apart from Moss and Remnick, the guest of honor was Metropolitan Home, Saveur, and Garden Design founding editor Dorothy Kalins, who joins the likes of Tina Brown, Graydon Carter, Hugh Hefner, and Gloria Steinem in the now 29-member Magazine Editors’ Hall of Fame.The four General Excellence winners, which, according to ASME, are now the most prestigious honors, were Aperture (for Literature, Science, and Politics), San Francisco magazine (Special Interest), T: The New York Times Style Magazine (Service and Lifestyle), and The New Yorker (News, Sports, and Entertainment).After Outside editor and ASME president Chris Keyes honored the previously announced winner of the ASME Award for Fiction (Zoetrope: All-Story‘s second consecutive win) and the five honorees of the ASME Next Awards, honoring magazine journalists under 30, “CNN Tonight” anchor Don Lemon took to the stage to begin the proceedings in earnest.“It’s been a tough year for all of us,” Lemon quipped. “I was 25 when it all started.”The first winner, in the Public Interest category, was The New Yorker, for Ronan Farrow’s reporting, which helped to break open the Harvey Weinstein scandal. It was The New Yorker‘s eighth win all-time in the category.Cosmopolitan then scored a repeat victory in the Personal Service category for its October story, “How to Run for Office,” followed by W, which earned its fourth Ellie award for photography.W editor Stefano Tonchi, accepting the award, said that the magazine tried to get celebrities to do something different and special in their portraits, “like a man kissing a man or a woman kissing a woman.”“Men kissing men and women kissing women,” replied Lemon, returning to the podium. “I’m here for all of it.”After Aperture won for General Excellence: Literature, Science and Politics, Texas Monthly earned the Ellie for Leisure Interests, for its July feature, “The Golden Age of BBQ.” Accepting the award was Tim Taliaferro, who stepped aside as EIC of the magazine just two weeks ago amid some controversy.Honored in the Single-Topic Issue category was National Geographic, which famously stepped outside of its yellow box for the January issue titled “Gender Revolution.”“I have never, in 38 years of journalism, had a reaction the way we did after we put a nine-year-old transgender girl on the cover,” said editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg, adding that readers credited the issue with enabling conversations they couldn’t have had before.After wins by New York and Time/Mic in the Columns/Commentary and Video categories, respectively, Alex Tizon earned a posthumous Ellie Award for Essays and Criticism for his viral June 2017 story in The Atlantic, “My Family’s Slave.”Next, Self, which shuttered its print edition at the end of 2016, earned the first-ever Ellie for Social Media.“This was a really huge pivot and change for us,” said editor-in-chief Carolyn Kylstra, accepting the award. “I’m so proud of the team and what we accomplished. When you no longer have that flagship property, everything else has to become the flagship property.”New York had two separate sections nominated in the Magazine Section category, which was won by its trendspotting section, “The Strategist.”The other first-time category, Digital Innovation, went to SB Nation, for its July feature about what football will look like in the future—which the category’s judges affectionately deemed “an online acid trip.”“Holy shit,” remarked editor Elena Bergeron.Among other winners and nominees of note, TMC Pulse—the monthly magazine serving Texas Medical Center—earned a surprise nomination in the Feature Writing category (GQ won). And despite losing out to T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Bon Appétit earned an eighth consecutive nomination in the General Excellence: Service and Lifestyle category.View the full list of Ellie Award winners here.2018 Ellie Awards Finalists (Winners in Bold)General ExcellenceNews, Sports and EntertainmentThe New Yorker; The Atlantic; The California Sunday Magazine; National Geographic; New YorkService and LifestyleT: The New York Times Style Magazine; Bon Appétit; Eater; Saveur; Teen VogueSpecial InterestSan Francisco; Bicycling; Inc.; Outside; Texas MonthlyLiterature, Science and Politics Aperture; The Marshall Project; Oxford American; Popular Science; Virginia Quarterly ReviewPublic InterestThe New Yorker for “Abuses of Power,” October 23 print issue, “Weighing the Costs of Speaking Out About Harvey Weinstein,” October 27 at newyorker.com, and “Harvey Weinstein’s Army of Spies,” November 6 at newyorker.com, by Ronan FarrowHarper’s Magazine for “Where Health Care Won’t Go,” by Helen Ouyang, JuneThe New Yorker for “The Takeover,” by Rachel Aviv, October 9ProPublica and NPR for “The Last Person You’d Expect to Die in Childbirth,” by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR, May 12, “Lost Mothers,” by Nina Martin, Emma Cillekens and Alessandra Freitas, July 17, and “Nothing Protects Black Women From Dying in Pregnancy and Childbirth,” by Nina Martin, ProPublica, and Renee Montagne, NPR, December 7, at propublica.orgVanity Fair for “The 5th Risk,” September, and “Made in the U.S.D.A.,” December, by Michael LewisPersonal ServiceCosmopolitan for “How to Run for Office,” reporting by Laura Brounstein, Meredith Bryan, Jessica Goodman, Emily C. Johnson, Tess Koman, Rachel Mosely, Rebecca Nelson and Helen Zook, October 10 at cosmopolitan.com and November print issueConsumer Reports for “Too Many Meds? America’s Love Affair With Prescription Medication,” by Teresa Carr, August 3 at consumerreports.orgGrist for “Ask Umbra’s 21-Day Apathy Detox,” by Umbra Fisk, April 17 at grist.orgSeventeen for “This Is a Story About Suicide,” by Andrea Stanley, November/DecemberWomen’s Health for the article “Wakey Wakey!” by Malia Jacobson, December print issue; “Sleep Center,” December 11 on womenshealthmag.com; and the video “Wakey Wakey!,” December 11 on facebook.com/womenshealthmagazinePhotographyW; GQ Style; National Geographic; New York; Virginia Quarterly ReviewDesignGQ; Bon Appétit; ESPN The Magazine; Men’s Health; WiredLeisure Interests5280 for “The 5280 Guide to Four Corners,” by Kasey Cordell, SeptemberBicycling for “How Cycling Works,” OctoberBon Appétit for “A Simple Roast Chicken,” by Amiel Stanek, OctoberNew York for “The Encyclopedia of Vegan Food,” by Robin Raisfeld and Rob Patronite, November 13-26Texas Monthly for “The Golden Age of BBQ,” by Daniel Vaughn, JuneSingle-Topic IssueNational Geographic for “Gender Revolution,” JanuaryThe California Sunday Magazine for “A Teenage Life,” December 3Columbia Journalism Review for “The Trump Issue,” FallNew York for “My New York,” October 16-29The New York Times Magazine for “The New York Issue,” June 4Feature PhotographyThe New Yorker for “Faces of an Epidemic,” photographs by Philip Montgomery, October 30 at newyorker.comThe New Republic for “Charlottesville’s Faces of Hate,” photographs by Mark Peterson, August 14 at newrepublic.comNew York for “The 43-Day Fashion Shoot,” photographs by Holly Andres, August 20 at thecut.comTIME for “Death Reigns on the Streets of Duterte’s Philippines,” photographs by James Nachtwey, January 16Vogue for “American Women,” photographs by Lynsey Addario, Evgenia Arbugaeva, Daniel Arnold, Jonas Bendiksen, Cass Bird, Charlie Engman, Alex Majoli, Bella Newman, Jackie Nickerson, Benjamin Rasmussen, Stefan Ruiz, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Lorna Simpson, Deanna and Ed Templeton and Mayan Toledano, March 8 at vogue.comMagazine SectionNew York for “The Strategist”Backpacker for “The Play List”Bon Appétit for “Starters”Martha Stewart Weddings for “Planner”New York for “The Culture Pages”Website New York; The Marshall Project; National Geographic; Pitchfork; VogueSocial MediaSELF; Mother Jones; The New Yorker; Seventeen; TIMEVideoTIME and Mic for “Life After Addiction,” video by Aja Harris and Paul Moakley, November 8 at time.comThe Atlantic for “What Will Happen to Undocumented Doctors?,” video by Jeremy Raff, February 2The New Yorker for “A Fever Dream at Beautycon,” video by Tim Hussin, September 18The Outline for “The Republican Who Quit the Party Because of Trump,” March 22Vogue for “We Are All Fabulous . . . ,” video by Oliver Hadlee Pearch, February 24; “Paris, Je T’aime,” video by Gordon von Steiner, July 20; and “Workin’ 9 to 5 . . . Inside the Vogue Office!,” video by Charlotte Wales, September 25Digital InnovationSB Nation for “17776: An American Football Story,” by Jon Bois, July 5HuffPost Highline for “FML,” by Michael Hobbes, December 14The Marshall Project With Condé Nast Entertainment and Participant Media for “We Are Witnesses,” by Jenny Carchman, October 26 at themarshallproject.orgNational Geographic Traveler for “North: An Illustrated Travelogue,” by Christoph Niemann, April 4TIME for “Finding Home: 3 Babies, 3 Families, 1 Year,” photographs by Lynsey Addario, reporting by Aryn Baker,  video by Francesca Trianni, December 18ReportingThe New York Times Magazine for “The Uncounted,” by Azmat Khan and Anand Gopal, November 19The California Sunday Magazine with the Investigative Fund for “Below Deck,” by Lizzie Presser, February 5ESPN The Magazine for “Sin City or Bust,” April 24, “Standing Down,” November 13, and “Roger Goodell Has a Jerry Jones Problem,” December 4, by Don Van Natta Jr. and Seth WickershamHarper’s Magazine with the Investigative Fund for “Ghost Nation,” by Nick Turse, JulyNational Geographic and ProPublica for “How the U.S. Triggered a Massacre in Mexico,” by Ginger Thompson, June 12 at propublica.orgThe New York Times Magazine With ProPublica for “Kushnerville,” by Alec MacGillis, May 28The New Yorker for “On the Brink,” by Evan Osnos, September 18Feature WritingGQ for “A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, SeptemberThe Atlantic for “My President Was Black,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, January/FebruaryThe Atlantic for “A Death at Penn State,” by Caitlin Flanagan, NovemberThe New York Times Magazine for “The Mailroom,” by Jeanne Marie Laskas, January 22TMC Pulse for “Alan Dickson’s Final Days,” by Alexandra Becker, JulyVirginia Quarterly Review for “The Useful Village,” by Ben Mauk, SpringWired With Epic Magazine for “Love in the Time of Robots,” by Alex Mar, NovemberEssays and CriticismThe Atlantic for “Lola’s Story,” by Alex Tizon, JuneElle for “Her Eyes Were Watching the Stars,” by Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, JuneNew York for “The Uninhabitable Earth,” by David Wallace-Wells, July 10-23The New Yorker for “Losing Streak,” by Kathryn Schulz, February 13 and 20Smithsonian for “What Ever Happened to the Russian Revolution?” by Ian Frazier, OctoberColumns and CommentaryNew York for three columns by Rebecca Traister: “Why the Harvey Weinstein Sexual-Harassment Allegations Didn’t Come Out Until Now,” October 5, “Your Reckoning. And Mine.,” November 12, and “This Moment Isn’t (Just) About Sex. It’s Really About Work,” December 10, at thecut.comBuzzFeed News for three columns by Bim Adewunmi: “How the Oscar Flub Demonstrates the Limits of Black Graciousness,” March 1, “How Oprah Got Her Acting Groove Back,” April 10, and “Maria Sharapova’s Rivalry With Serena Williams Is in Her Head,” September 9ESPN The Magazine for three columns by Howard Bryant: “The Williams Movement,” February 27, “Power Play,” April 24, and “How Is This Still a Debate?” December 4Longreads for three columns by Laurie Penny: “The Horizon of Desire” October 10, “We’re All Mad Here: Weinstein, Women, and the Language of Lunacy,” October 23, and “The Unforgiving Minute,” November 7Pitchfork for three columns by Jayson Greene: “Is Rihanna the Most Influential Pop Singer of the Past Decade?” April 5, “Can Music Heal Trauma? Exploring the Therapeutic Powers of Sound,” September 20, and “Do Androids Dream of Electric Guitars? Exploring the Future of Musical A.I.,” June 12last_img read more

Wilmington High School Sports Schedule Week of April 15 2018

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first_imgWednesday, April 18Thursday, April 19No Games Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington High School Varsity Sports Schedule (Week of April 10)In “Sports”Wilmington High School Varsity Sports Schedule (Week of April 24)In “Sports”Wilmington High School Sports Schedule (Week of April 2, 2017)In “Sports” Monday, April 16All Games POSTPONED due to weatherTuesday, April 17No Games WILMINGTON, MA — Below is the Wilmington High School Sports Schedule for the week of April 15, 2018.Sunday, April 15No Games Friday, April 20Saturday, April 21No Games(NOTE: The above information is from Big Teams.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.last_img read more

Hyundai 45 EV teaser shows a retroinspired concept

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first_img 40 Photos 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Post a comment No fob required with the Hyundai Sonata Digitial Key 2020 Bentley Continental GT: Concept looks with a surprise inside Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class first drive: If it ain’t broke… Hyundai Frankfurt Motor Show 2019 Hyundai 2020 Hyundai Ioniq is available in many flavors Review • 2019 Hyundai Kona Electric review: Ease into electrificationcenter_img Preview • 2019 Hyundai Kona Electric: A fun EV with competitive numbers More From Roadshow More about 2019 Hyundai Kona Electric 0 Concept Cars Electric Cars Tags Electric cars can look cool. Hyundai Hyundai is looking to the past for its latest design inspiration and the automaker provided a first look at the electric concept car scheduled for a debut at the 2019 Frankfurt Motor Show next month.Dubbed the Hyundai 45, the company said the overall design previews the direction the South Korean brand will take its styling in the years to come. This teaser image comes just about a week after Hyundai said it would use the Frankfurt Motor Show as the backdrop to a new electric-car concept.Previously, the company said the design will reflect a focus on driver personalization, which Hyundai believes will increase in the future. The automaker added that the concept is also the next step in Hyundai’s “sensuous, sportiness” design language. This ethos influenced the upcoming Sonata, and so far, it’s been a very good thing for the brand’s vehicles overall in my opinion.Taking a gander at the sole photo doesn’t tell us too much, but it does have a somewhat retro feel to it. That’s on purpose, actually. The automaker said the 45 concept takes nods from the first car it produced in 1975: the Pony. Like the Pony, the 45 seems to have a tall and wedgier shape around the rear window, but the finer elements hardly mimic the brand’s original model.Individual LED lights appear to make up the taillight shape and the typical Hyundai badge is gone. Instead, the “Hyundai” name resides on the right of the rear fascia. Fender flares also appear to come to a point from the rear angle and “45” seems illuminated on a rear valence.While the 45 concept will likely be the star of the show, Hyundai also plans to give us a look at its future electric race car and the new i10. We’ll be on the ground with the latest from the show when Hyundai takes the sheets off on Sept. 10. Share your voice 1:36last_img read more

Satellite used to record sea ice data malfunctions

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first_imgThe satellite used to record sea ice data in the Arctic malfunctioned in April, and scientists are scrambling to calibrate a month of missing data.Download AudioThe graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of February 3, 2016, along with daily ice extent data for four previous years. (Graphic courtesy of National Snow & Ice Data Center)In mid-March, the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported the lowest maximum sea ice extent in satellite history.“It was a record low in our satellite record, which is quite consistent,” explained NSIDC lead scientist Ted Scambos. “We work on it a lot to make sure we can compare it, one year to the next.”NSIDC first started recording sea ice data in 1978.Julienne Stroeve is an NSIDC scientist who studies sea ice conditions in the Arctic. Stroeve said she and her fellow scientists noticed a glitch in their data in early April.“We started getting false ice concentrations in parts of the Arctic where you wouldn’t have sea ice,” Stroeve explained, “so it was biasing our extent.”“The good news is they’ve found another satellite in that same type of series,” confirmed Amy Holman with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “They believe the data is compatible enough that we can continue the data record.”The satellite Holman is referring to has been recording sea ice data for a year now, which Julienne Stroeve said should be enough time to cross-calibrate. Consistency is key, Stroeve said.“You want as long of a data record as possible to really see how much this change we’re seeing is due to natural climate variability, for example, or how much is due to anthropogenic warming.”To help make that distinction, NSIDC captures an image of sea ice extent in the Arctic every day and posts daily updates online. The agency has since suspended the updates and removed all of April’s data from NSIDC’s archives.Arctic sea ice extent for March 2016 was 14.43 million square kilometers (5.57 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that month. (Graphic courtesy of National Snow & Ice Data Center)While the malfunction was a bit of a shock, Stroeve said it was bound to happen.“It wasn’t surprising that this happened, because the satellite was pretty old,” Stroeve said, “so eventually the sensors do degrade and start giving bad data.”The satellite that malfunctioned was launched ten years ago. The one they’re relying on now was launched nine years ago. Stroeve said there is a backup to this backup, but that one is still on the ground.“Congress took away the funds for the Air Force to launch it, which is very unfortunate,” Stroeve said. “Obviously, we’re hoping that pressure can be put on Congress to launch that other satellite.”For now, Stroeve and her colleagues will continue cross-calibrating data, with the hopes that the one they’re using now will stay online until Congress approves funding for the next series of satellites.last_img read more

Karimnagar man gets life imprisonment in rape of minor girl

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first_imgA 20-year-old man hailing from Rammadugu mandal of Karimnagar district was awarded life imprisonment in a rape case registered against him in 2016. Ajay (20), a native of Gundi village had sexually assaulted a minor girl in 2016. A case was registered against him by the girl’s family members then. The first additional sessions court judge Justice Dr. S Srinivas Reddy who dealt with the case today has awarded life sentence to the accused. The accused was also awarded a penalty of Rs 40,000 This is the second case in a fortnight after a minor got life imprisonment for kidnapping, raping and murdering an 11-year-old boy in Hyderabad.last_img